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Re-installing after upgrade

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Lyn Patterson, Sep 24, 2003.

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  1. Lyn Patterson

    Lyn Patterson Thread Starter

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    I am hoping shortly to upgrade from 433MHz, 192 RAM, 8Gb hard drive to 2GHz, 256RAM, 40Gb.

    I use Windows 98SE and will stick with that.

    To cut down on costs, I am thinking of re-installing Windows and everything else myself. What is the best way to go about this? I have the 2 Windows discs, so is it just a case of inserting the first one then following instructions?

    I have a CDR-W so can I just put the entire hard-drive on disks?

    Is it better to install from an original software disk if I have it instead of just copying my entire hard drive?

    Is there anyway to save all my Windows settings or will I have to re-do everything (like display settings) when I re-install?

    Thanks

    Lyn
     
  2. GwizJoe

    GwizJoe

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    Well,depending on what other changes you are going to do,I would suggest just continuing to use the 8gig HDD.I would set it up as the master and use the 40gig as a slave and save only data to it (personal files,saves of various types,etc.).I would transfer whatever personal stuff is on it (the 8gig) already to the 40,and slim down the 8 to just the operating system and executable programs.
    That way you don't have to be ready to make any great changes at all,and you can move the stuff around at your leisure.You would see your system just the way you have always seen it,and only have to reload a few minimal drivers (for the new board,etc.).
    On the other hand,you could just burn all your personal files to disks,and be prepared to set up a totally new system,and not utilize the 8gig at all after the new rig is set up.
    Your choice...

    Of course,it is possible to copy the entire body of one drive to another,but it is never as easy as it seems it should be.
    Personally,I'd use that 8gig until it doesn't want to work any more.Set up as just the system drive for the OS and programs,you won't lose much of anything when it does quit,if ever.Just be sure to keep all your personal stuff saved to the 40gig,and burn copies of anything that you consider REALLY important.

    Just my opinion...
     
  3. Lyn Patterson

    Lyn Patterson Thread Starter

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    GWizJoe

    Wow!!!! I am impressed. What a great idea! Are you saying that when I get my new box, I get them to install the current 8Gb hard drive into the new box as well as the new 40Gb. Just leave everything on the 8Gb hard drive until I get it home and can move stuff at my leisure. Then I move everything except the OS and executable programmes. So this way I would not have to re-install Windows - is that correct? Or anything? I would just have to move my data etc to the new drive.

    Master and slave - how do I set that up?

    This does sound a great solution!

    Lyn
     
  4. GwizJoe

    GwizJoe

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    Well,each hard-drive has jumpers on them which you set for which is "master" and which is "slave".Usually they are very clearly marked as to which is which.I always set my boot drive C: up as the "master" on IDE channel 1.In your case,that would be the original 8gig hard-drive.
    On the motherboard,you should have 2 IDE connections (where the ribbon cables go).You can have 2 IDE devices on each ribbon cable,for a total of 4 devices.In my main unit,I have 2 hard-drives on one ribbon,then my DVD and CD -burner on the other.

    Now...,there will still need to be a few drivers that will have to be installed on the original 8gig drive,but there should be a driver disk for the motherboard that would have everything neccesary.
    Unless you are also getting a new video and sound system,you should be able to easily get this system up in a matter of minutes.And...,it will look just like your old one,except that you will have another drive (the new 40gig) available to use as the D: drive.
    That drive will still need to be partitioned and formatted,but it will not need to have Windows installed on it at all.Windows running on the C: drive,will automatically see it as an empty drive for you to save all your treasures to.

    Anyone assembling this setup for you should know how to do this.

    There are a few nice things about running this way;
    1.It takes a lot of programs to fill up even an 8gig drive.
    2.If it is older and fails,you don't lose everything for personal data,just the OS and programs.Which hopefully you can easily replace,but personal data saves are a lot harder to recover from a failed drive,if at all.
    3.Should you ever get a virus that infects the system,it will (most likely) not affect the D: drive,and you are only looking at a repartioning and reformatting of the C: drive.And again,you load the OS on it,a few needed drivers,reinstall the programs,and you are good to go.No lost personal data,and a very fast recovery from a bad situation.Single drive units can lose everything from a simple virus infection.

    Yep...,I think this is just what you wanted. ;)
     
  5. GwizJoe

    GwizJoe

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    Oh yes...,here is what the connections should look like:

    IDE channel 1:
    8gig set as "Master" (Bootable system drive 'C')
    40gig set as "Slave" (Blank drive 'D')
    IDE channel 2:
    CD-ROM set as "Master" (or DVD-ROM)
    CD-RW set as "Slave" (or DVD-RW)

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    When I set up a system like this,I check each device in the BIOS as I am installing them.
    I start with the optical drives 1st,making sure that the BIOS sees them as master and slave on IDE 2.Then I install the Hard-Drives and check that the BIOS reads them as master and slave on IDE 1.
    Obviously,until the hard-drives are installed,it won't boot to Windows,but as soon as it sees that they are there...,let it try it's first session as a Windows Based Computer.

    Have fun with the new toy!
     
  6. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

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    The drive operates at a better performance level and insures better stability if setup like this:

    IDE1
    Master 8Gig
    Slave CD-ROM/DVD

    IDE2
    Master CDRW/DVDRW
    Slave 40 Gig

    Transfer speeds are better and burning works significantly better when the "ROM" drives are on separate IDE channels because of the "seek and read" times. The CDRW or DVDRW should ALWAYS be setup as MASTER to prevent complications.
     
  7. Lyn Patterson

    Lyn Patterson Thread Starter

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    GWizJoe - thanks - also StillLearnin'

    This all sounds great and I do appreciate the time you have spent with this advice. Why throw away a perfectly good hard drive just because it is full?

    Currently I have drives C:= Local drive, D = CD-ROM and E = CDRW.

    StillLearnin' advises setting up the CD drives on separate IDE's, the CDRW being Master with the new 40Gb as Slave on IDE2.

    GWizJoe - do you concur?

    My final question - I am going to get my tech company to do this - I am buying a new box and they will be transferring the CDRW to the new box. I will now be asking them to also transfer the 8Gb drive also and set it up as Master. How long will this take them - I am wondering if they will charge extra for this so would like to know how big a job it is timewise.

    Thanks again. Can't wait to get operational !
     
  8. GwizJoe

    GwizJoe

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    Lyn,
    StillLearnin' makes a good point...,especially about the "seek and read" times.It will generally work in just about any configuration,although some writers do prefer to be the "master" on their IDE channel.

    If you are using a full,or mid-ATX case with plenty of slots and can get the hard-drives installed on rails,you should be able to set it up just as StillLearnin' suggested.

    I use a micro-ATX case and it is sort of cramped for space and restricted by the available slots,and placement of the drives.
     
  9. Lyn Patterson

    Lyn Patterson Thread Starter

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    GWzJoe

    What about the time it will take the tech to set this up - so I can get an idea of the extra cost that may be involved.

    Thanks for all your input.
     
  10. greengeek

    greengeek

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    Windows is going to get quite a shock when it discovers it's in a PC with a 2Ghz processor instead of a 433Mhz. Your tech might need a couple of hours to sort it all out. You mentioned two Windows CDs, are they recovery CDs?
     
  11. Lyn Patterson

    Lyn Patterson Thread Starter

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    greengeek

    One is called Windows Starts Here and the other is just the Windows 98SE disk.
     
  12. greengeek

    greengeek

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    OK then, lucky it wasn't recovery CDs because they probably wouldn't have worked in a new machine. Hope it's up and running soon!
     
  13. Ash_11

    Ash_11

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  14. GwizJoe

    GwizJoe

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    My last similar build took about 2 hours at a leisurely pace.
    I was doing the same sort of thing,too,Windows pre-installed.It came right up on the first try.Altogether it was just under 4 hours to have it fully functioning,tested,and on-line...

    As far as what your tech charges you...,I have no idea what extra costs would be involved,but it should be minimal.
     
  15. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

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    from GwizJoe:

    "Altogether it was just under 4 hours to have it fully functioning,tested,and on-line..."

    That's about "book" time for that type of job. The cheapest shop around here charges $65 an hour.
     
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