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Reconfigure Add/Remove Windows Components

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by JFlattum, Oct 14, 2008.

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  1. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    When trying to remove Windows Messenger, I made a mess of the Add/Remove Windows Components section of Add/Remove Programs from the Control Panel.

    Instructions are very confusing, as Windows tells you in order to add/remove the various components, either check or uncheck the box. Not knowing if I should check or uncheck, I tried both, and in the process removed numerous if not all the components.

    Somehow, I managed to get Internet Explorer and Outlook Express back. I honestly do not remember how I did this as I was in a panic state. Meanwhile, I lost MSPaint. And, I'm worried about the other components, like Indexing Service, Networking Services, etc.

    I may be making more of an issue than need be. Currently, in the list of components, Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, and Windows Media Player ARE checked. And obviously, those 3 programs are working.

    So, in order to reinstall components that may or may not be missing, do I simply CHECK the boxes?

    Accessories and Utilities is NOT checked. I'm assuming that's the reason for why MSPAINT disappeared.

    Hopefully I answered my own question, so perhaps I just need a confirmation.

    Still, it's very confusing as to whether I should check or uncheck. Does check mean the program will load, and no check means it will not? Or is it the other way around?

    Thanx.
     
  2. JeffM

    JeffM

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    You have it correct. CHECK the sections that you need
     
  3. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    You should also note that you can't uninstall Internet Explorer, Outlook Express, Windows Messenger, or Windows Media Player from here (as the description states). All these boxes do is remove the icons for the program from the start menu/desktop. The programs are still installed and functional.

    Jerry
     
  4. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    thanx jeff.

    outcaste: that's not true. i lost explorer, express and wmp but NOT frickin' messenger. again, i managed to reinstall those 3 items. but now i've lost Paint and Volume Control. i haven't tried to reinstall the items i unchecked (according to jeff).

    it's messenger i want to get rid of.
     
  5. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    It is true. If you read the description it clearly states is only removes access to the program from the Start Menu and/or Desktop (also pulls it out of the Quick Launch toolbar). You'll also note the space required is zero -- it does not add/remove files.

    You can still start any of them from an associated file (URL shortcut, mp3, etc), or from the run box: type iexplore for IE, msimn for Outlook Express, msmsgs for Windows Messenger, and wmplayer for WMP. The will all run fine even though you've "uninstalled" them.

    If you've upgraded any of these (IE7, MSN/Windows Live Messenger, WMP11 {WMP10 on some systems}) those you can uninstall, but it will simply revert you back to the version that shipped with XP. They will be listed in the Regular Add/Remove Programs applet, not in the Windows Components applet.

    If you really want to completely remove Windows Messenger, you have to edit the sysoc.inf file to unhide the component.

    Click Start | Run, type inf press enter
    type syso
    right click on sysoc.inf (not on sysoc/PNF)
    Find the line that reads:
    msmsgs=msgrocm.dll,OcEntry,msmsgs.inf,hide,7
    Remove the word hide so the line reads:
    msmsgs=msgrocm.dll,OcEntry,msmsgs.inf,,7
    Save the file.

    Now when you go into Add/Remove Windows Components, there will be a 2nd Windows Messenger entry that is 14.3 MB in size. This one will actually remove the Windows Messenger files.

    HTH

    Jerry
     
  6. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    outcaste:

    excellent. thank you. yes, i didn't know only the shortcuts were deleted and not the files, which explains why i was able to bring them back.

    i don't have the courage to mess with an inf file. inf, dll, the registry, etc., all that is over my head. but, i am smart enough to ask guys like you about such issues.

    messenger is irritating, but i can live with it.
     
  7. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    outcaste:

    i have a new issue. when trying to reinstall what i deleted, i'm now getting repeated messages that say certain files cannot be copied. i believe this has to do with service pack 3. service pack 3 is listed in the main listing of add/remove programs. i don't remember how i got the update from service pack 2. i don't use auto update because i use my computer for audio recording and this was turned off by the folks who built my computer (I used pro tools recording software, if you're familiar with it). i was just recently told service pack 3 was not a good thing to install because of issues with pro tools. i'm wondering if i should revert back to service pack 2, but i don't know how, and, i'm not 100% convinced i should. anyway, since i'm getting those "cannot copy" error messages, does this mean the service pack 3 might be corrupted?
     
  8. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    Sorry for the late reply, somehow missed the last message.

    When you try to re-install, are you prompted for the CD, or does it just start copying files?
    What does the error message say exactly?
    Cannot copy would usually mean the CD can't be read, or if copying from the hard drive, that the file may have been deleted. If it was an issue with Service Pack 3, it would more likely say the file being copied is an older version than the existing one and ask if you want to replace it or skip it.
    Need a bit more info here to figure out what we can do.


    You might want to check your settings for Automatic Updates, it may have been turned back on somehow. Control Panel | Automatic Updates.

    To revert back to SP2, just uninstall SP3 from Add/Remove programs. If any updates have been installed since SP3, they might have to be re-applied. As long as the C:\WINDOWS\$hf_mig$ folder hasn't been removed/corrupted, the uninstaller shouldn't remove anything newer than what it installed, or remove files that later updates require.

    I've never had any problems uninstalling service packs, but the few times I have it's been before any later updates had been applied. Always a good idea to have your data backed up though, and to make your own System Restore point first.

    HTH

    Jerry
     
  9. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    My apologies also, for the late reply.

    Here is the error message I get:

    first, i'm trying to re-install "Accessories and Utilities" under "Add/Remove Windows Components via the Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel. There are other programs in the list I want to re-install, but did not attempt yet due to the "Accessories and Utilties" not installing correctly.

    Error message:

    setup cannot copy the file xxx

    ensure that the location specified below is correct, or change it and insert "Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3 CD" in the drive you specify.

    xxx represents numerous files listed one at a time, so much so, that i just close out, because obviously something major is missing. i suspect i need to reload service pack 3.

    however, service pack 3 is NOT recommended for my unit. my computer was designed for audio recording and i believe produces conflict with Pro Tools by Digidesign, a industry standard recording software.

    also, service pack 3 IS listed in the list of Add/Remove Programs. should i just go ahead and uninstall it?

    if i uninstall service pack 3, will windows automatically revert back to service pack 2?

    if you can, please clarify what to do concerning updates that may or may not have already been installed. as you can see, i'm not particularly adept here, so please don't assume i know what i'm doing.

    however, in deference to my ignorance, i did purchase the newest version of acronis home version 2009. i'm clueless as to how to use it, but i'll learn. and, i won't create a restore point until after i solve this current issue. am i making the right choice?

    thanx for your help and patience.

    jerry flattum
     
  10. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    i'm not sure i will automatically receive an email notification of a reply. can you please let me know when you reply? my email is: flat0027 at umn.edu
     
  11. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    You may want to use the report button and ask a Moderator to remove your email address, or the spam bots will grab it and get you added to tons of lists.


    Not sure how SP3 got installed, but uninstalling it will just revert you back to whatever you had before. If that was SP2, that's where you'll be.

    As for other updates, I wouldn't worry about them unless you have been deleting files from the C:\WINDOWS\$hf_mig$ folder.

    As for the error message, it's saying it can't find the file, so that means it's looking in the wrong place for the files (the location should be displayed in a drop down box). As it's asking for a disk with SP3, it certainly seems that SP3 has been installed. I don't think this means SP3 is corrupted or needs to be re-installed.

    The location is usually the i386 folder on the CD-ROM drive, or the i386 folder on your PC, usually C:\i386. If that folder exists but the location is pointing someplace else, you may just need to change the location to point to the C:\i386 folder, then everything will re-install correctly.

    Acronis can make a backup of your data, or an image of the entire drive that can be used to "restore" the system. It's fairly easy to use, but you need to have a drive big enough to store the backup file it will create. If you downloaded Acronis rather than buying a CD, be sure you create the Bootable Rescue media and TEST it to make sure you can boot the PC from it.

    If you have a spare drive that is the same size or larger than your current system drive, you can just clone the drive, then disconnect your current drive (just unplug the power to the drive). Then you can then work on the copy and still have your current setup to fall back on if it doesn't work out.

    This is not the same as a "restore point" created by Windows System Restore feature. Creating a Restore Point won't hurt anything, in fact your PC usually makes a new one every day. Most Windows Updates will create a restore point before they are installed/uninstalled, as will most major software installs. This restore point backs up the registry and key system files, but usually doesn't back up the actual Program files, or your data.

    So I would first backup/clone the drive.
    Check the location it's trying to read the files from. If you have a C:\i386 folder, point it there. You might also try pointing it to C:\Windows and C:\Windows\System32. If the files are still there, you can sometimes do this to get the system to recreate the registry entries it needs.
    If this works, and you don't see any issues with SP3 and your Audio software, you may just want to leave it installed.
    Otherwise, uninstall SP3 (make a new backup if you have the room).

    I would suggest you download SP3 from MS to have on hand. If for some reason it can't complete the uninstall, and can't restore the system back to where it was before the uninstall started, you may have to re-install SP3

    HTH

    Jerry
     
  12. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    outcaste:

    thanx much for your help.

    i reported to the moderator as you advised, to have the entry with my email removed.

    attached is a screen shot of all the i386 folders found on my c: drive. consequently, i don't know which one to choose.

    i personally downloaded service pack 3. it wasn't until later i found out service pack 3 would create potential conflict with my recording software. i haven't noticed any conflict yet.

    concerning the backup proceedure, i don't feel confident enough to follow your instructions on my own. i think i need to dig into acronis a bit more. i downloaded the full version of acronis knowing i need it, but don't know how to use it.

    i have 3 internal drives. one is used for windows and programs (C: drive). the other 2 are used for recording, one for sample libraries, the other for audio sessions. there is ample room on the other two drives, with the exception i keep those drives open for business.

    however, i have 3 external drives as well. i'm sure any one of them have enough space for the clone.

    but again, it's very easy for me to screw things up, obviously, considering the current problem i have.

    and my system is delicately configured to support Pro Tools and all my virtual instruments and sample libraries. this configuration was performed by the company i bought it from. installation of some of these programs is very difficult, that is, almost all the programs were installed by them and not me.

    in fact, i requested advice from them as well. since they do not support windows, their advice was to re-create the original restore point. but this advice comes at a huge price, meaning, all my programs would have to be re-installed. i can't do this. so, i would have to send the computer back to them and what a headache that will be, not to mention the loss of time.

    something tells me i don't have to resort to such drastic measures. in terms of current operation, the only thing i notice missing is the volume control usually found in the systray. if i'm not mistaken, paint was also missing, but somehow magically reappeared!

    i don't understand the workings of a restore point. i don't have the expertise to determine first, where to find a restore point, and then second, select the RIGHT restore point, and 3, either select and/or create a new restore point.

    i would think the best restore point is the one where the computer was operating at it's best. but to try to go back to a point before i messed with the add/remove in the control panel seems more trouble than it's worth, especially in terms of all the other programs i have installed.

    i can see the benefits in keeping some sort of log when installing/uninstalling programs, but that's hindsight.

    i can't pull the power on the drive i want to clone because it's internal. so your instructions to disconnect the drive don't make sense. and for me, i consider this a dangerous move.

    overall, i don't get why i would be advised to re-install original factory settings, whenever something goes wrong. when this is suggested, i don't think the person suggesting it realizes what an ordeal it means for me. or, i simply refuse to accept this is what has to be done, which means re-installing all my programs from scratch.

    hell, i might as well buy a new system if it goes that far.

    so really, isn't there a simpler solution to this problem?

    hopefully the attachment--the screen shot of all the i386 folders--and picking the right one to point to, will be all i need to do.

    let me know if the attachment is visible, and also let me know if it was safe to upload this attachment.

    thanx so much.
     
  13. JFlattum

    JFlattum Thread Starter

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    i'm sorry. i don't see the attachment available. should i try inserting it as a picture in a reply?
     
  14. valis

    valis Moderator

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    edited out email per request.
     
  15. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    Not sure why the attachment didn't work. If the image was a BMP file, it may have been too large. Try saving it as a JPG file instead.

    If there is a C:\i386 folder, that's the one to try. Can't hurt to try the others though; It will either say it still can't find the files, the files are the wrong version, or it will work.

    As SP3 does appear in Add/Remove it's likely that it is installed. It's possible that the entry could be there if an install failed or was cancelled, so let's check to make sure it is there, and see just when it was installed.

    Right click My Computer and click Properties. If SP3 installed it will be listed here.
    If this was installed by Automatic Updates, or from Windows Update, it will be listed in the history. Open Internet Explorer, then click Tools | Windows Update. On the left, click Review your update history. Look for Windows XP Service Pack 3 (KB936939). It will show the date it was installed, and if it was successful.

    You can also use either of these tools to see what date it was installed:
    BelArc Advisor
    SIW - System Information for Windows

    SIW has a standalone version that does not install anything on your system.

    If SP3 has been installed for a while, and doesn't seem to be interfering with your applications, you may just want to leave it installed.

    In that case, you have two options, either create an XP CD that has SP3 slipstreamed in, or create an i386 folder with SP3 integrated into it to use for installing the components you want.

    Slipstreaming Guide:
    This guide walks you though Using Autostreamer to slipstream a Service Pack. Though it refers to XP, the AutoStreamer program works with Win2K (adding SP3/SP4 to any version) and Win2K3.

    This works for SP3 as well, just use the SP3 file I linked above.

    You can create an updated i386 folder by following the Method 1 steps from this article:
    How to integrate Windows XP Service Pack 2 files into the Windows XP installation folder
    Just substitute SP3 where the article says SP2, and use
    WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-x86-ENU.exe /integrate:C:\XPCD
    for step 6. If you already have a folder C:\XPCD\i386, make one for C:\XPCDSP3\i386 instead and use WindowsXP-KB936929-SP3-x86-ENU.exe /integrate:C:\XPCDSP3 instead.
    Then, when you get the error message

    setup cannot copy the file xxx

    ensure that the location specified below is correct, or change it and insert "Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3 CD" in the drive you specify.


    Change the displayed path by typing or browsing to C:\XPCD\i386 (or C:\XPCDSP3\i386)

    As for cloning, if you clone the drive (source) directly to another drive (destination), everything on the destination drive will be erased. You generally use this method if you are replacing a drive. Acronis will let you clone to an external USB drive, though I've never tried that myself.
    Cloning a drive to an image file does not delete anything on the destination drive. This allows you to restore the original drive (or a replacement) to the state it was in when the image was taken.

    I've never had a clone fail unless there was a power failure during the process, in which case you just redo it, but I always like to verify that the cloned drive works, or that the image can be successfully restored. In the first case that means removing the original drive (or just disconnecting the power to it) and booting with the cloned drive. If you cloned directly to a USB external, that would entail removing the external drive from it's enclosure and installing it into the PC.

    In the second, you have to restore the image to a drive to test it. Even though the chance of something going wrong is remote, in this situation, where if something goes wrong you would have to send the PC out and would lose time, I would always use a 2nd, blank hard drive to verify the image, rather than restoring to the original drive.

    As for the Windows XP System Restore, it can be found at Start All Programs | Accessories | System Tools | System Restore
    You can create a restore point, or pick a point to go back to. System Restore creates a new restore point before going back, so if you don't like the results, you can always undo it.

    The company you bought this from may have been referring to a restore point they created after installing the Pro Tools software. Problem is that there is a fixed amount of space for restore points, and old ones are deleted to make room when needed, so it may no longer exist. Or they may be referring to a Factory Recovery, that would set the system back to the state it was in when shipped. That may or may not include the Pro Tools software, but from what you've said it doesn't sound like it.

    For the missing Volume Control, if it's the Windows volume control, goto Control Panel | Sounds and Audio Devices and place a check in the Place volume control in the taskbar box. If that's already checked, uncheck it, apply, then re-check it.

    If it's a volume control provided by your sound card software you'll need to see if there is an options panel to enable it.

    HTH

    Jerry
     
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