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Solved Recovering Deleted Files

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Dudesaha, Feb 17, 2017.

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  1. Dudesaha

    Dudesaha Thread Starter

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    Hello everyone,please I don't really know exactly much on all these stuffs but I'm putting my effort to,so i was wondering how comes deleted files can be recovered,then i looked it up and from what i saw online i discovered that when you delete a file it doesn't actually get deleted, it's still there until another file overwrites it or thereabout.but what gets me confused is that, ok what if i have a 2gb pen drive and i have a 1gb file in it, then i delete the 1gb file to copy a 1.9gb document in the pendrive, so does that mean the 2gb pendrive is now actually carrying 2.9gb of files in it? So if i then delete the 1.9gb file i can still recover the 1gb file, so what is the actual size of the pendrive?it is limitless or its more than two gb
     
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  3. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor

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    A 2GB drive has approx. 1905MB (1.86GB) available for user storage (the remaining 143MB is used by the USB Flash Drive to store its firmware essential for operation).

    If you have a 1GB 1024MB file of data on the flash drive and you delete it providing there is no the data on the drive you now have the total capacity shown above

    If you now install to the flash pen 1.9GB of data - you have overwritten the sectors used by the original 1GB of data

    I am unsure as you why you would think that a drive or any storage medium eg DVD disc can suddenly have greater storage capacity than that with which it was manufactured.

    Is the answer to your question not provided by you here
    I do not mean that to be in any manner other than helpful - I think with respect you are looking for some deep hidden meaning to the principle of recovering data that has simply been deleted but then the drive has not been written to or of course formatted.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017
  4. Dudesaha

    Dudesaha Thread Starter

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    Thanks,so does that mean that if i have a 1gb pendrive that is occupied with a 500mb file,and i delete the file,then i completely occupy the pendrive with another file of about 1gb.then i delete the 1gb file,so i won't be able to recover the 500mb file?
     
  5. valis

    valis Moderator

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    Correct. At that point in time, it has been overwritten with new data.
     
  6. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    When you delete a file, it is not actually deleted. What you are really doing to removing the reference to the file in the MFT or FAT [master file table or file allocation table] This is what tells the operating system where the file is located. Without the info in the MFT, the operating system is now free to write data to that place on the drive. Depending on how much effort, time and money you want to spend, the data may still be recoverable after a single overwrite.

    This is the reason why programs that securely delete a file overwrite that area of the disk multiple times. A DOD wipe is 7 passes after which [unless some very specialized techniques are used] the data is gone. Even CCleaner has an option to wipe free space or securely delete with up to 35 passes.
     
  7. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor

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    I agree -
    you may treat the MFT for a simple explanation as the index in a library
    That is easy to understand
    Without the index in the library or indeed in a book - finding what you want would be well nigh impossible

    It is not really as simple as that and a more detailed explanation of the MFT is here
    NTFS has the MFT
    FAT has the file allocation table
    however basically this is the detail of the MFT to which my colleague has referred

    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/file/ntfs/archMFT-c.html
    an old article but still easy to understand rather than providing you with unnecessary technical details

    I THINK the $1000 question is - are your questions really just
    to increase your knowledge
    OR are you actually asking in the hope of recovering data.



    For the benefit of anyone browsing the topic the MFT is not of course just the simplicity of the index I mentioned.
    For information ONLY
    Master File Table
    The layout of the Master File Table is shown below:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017
  8. Dudesaha

    Dudesaha Thread Starter

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    Wow. Thanks so much guys, i didn't think I'll get this much replies and explanations.@macboatrecord, it's more of to increase my knowledge, because i've used recuva several times but i was just trying to really understand how it works.
     
  9. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor

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    Cheers
    Good to build your knowledge, sometimes helps when trying to solve problems
    Mark it solved please by clicking mark solved button on your post
    Unless of course you have further queries related to this aspect
     
  10. Dudesaha

    Dudesaha Thread Starter

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    No i don't,thanks.
     
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