1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Registering a domain

Discussion in 'Web Design & Development' started by rpndt1, Feb 2, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. rpndt1

    rpndt1 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Messages:
    66
    There are so many domain register sites out there with varying prices. Does price really affect the ability to reserve domain space (www.namehere.com)? Some sites offer the service for 4.95 while others go up to a lot more. And once we register, is that domain ours forever or is there still a charge?

    Is registering a domain the same as web hosting (and accompanying email, ftp service, etc.)?
    I can't get all this straight.

    And yes, I'm a newbie when it comes to website development etc.

    Thanks in Advance

    -R
     
  2. jd_957

    jd_957 Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,099
  3. Heatsink

    Heatsink

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Registering a domain simply reserves that domain name for your use. Once you register your domain name then nobody else can use it.

    Domain name registration is a renewable fee, usually on a yearly basis. If you fail to renew your domain, then it becomes available for others to purchase.

    There are many reasons why different domain registrars have varying prices. Some of them offer value added services such as DNS, Domain name parking, renewal notices and the like and therefore charge more.

    On the other hand, some of them are certainly out to scam you. Read the fine print VERY carefully before you buy a domain from someone. There have been cases where the customer thought they were purchasing a domain name, but in reality they were instructing the company to buy it on their behalf and rent it to them. At the end of the day, they did not own their domain name and company that sold it to them did. They raised their 'rental' fees as they saw fit and caused quite a bit of grief.

    I would ask around for recommendations - I'm Canadian and I use CanReg for all my registration needs. Yes they're more expensive, but they supply me with DNS and I trust them :)

    Once you have a domain you will have to buy a hosting package to point it to. This is your www, ftp, email, etc services.

    To recap:

    buy a domain -> buy a hosting package -> use DNS (hopefully supplied by your domain registrar) to point your domain to your host.

    If you ask more specific questions I can give you more specific answers...
     
  4. rpndt1

    rpndt1 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Messages:
    66
    could you please elucidate on "domain name parking" and "DNS"? ...also, with this domain name, anything within www.myname.com would be fully under my jurisdiction? For example: www.page.myname.com.

    I am attempting to experiment with web page design but I might wait until I know a little programming and whatnot ;)

    I tried googling "domain registration" and pulled up about fifty billion sites with all these flashing offers and "specials." :eek: and I got confused :(


    Thanks for answering my questions and thanks for the website.

    I think I will wait a little bit before registering anything, as I doubt the domain name in question will be taken in the near future :):mysterious smile::).

    Update
    : jd_957...I found an excellent answer through the link you provided me. http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=360647
     
  5. jd_957

    jd_957 Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Messages:
    1,099
    you are welcome. and like my grandmother has told me.......look before you leap.

    good luck ;) (y)
     
  6. Heatsink

    Heatsink

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Not sure if you found the answers you were looking for, so here's my 2 cents worth on your questions. It's easier to tackle them in this order:

    1. DNS: Domain Name Server. Every computer on the internet has an IP address assigned to it. This is part of the method by which internet traffic is exchanged. An IP address takes the form of a series of numbers (such as 67.89.444.56 - totally made up). By way of example, your computer has an IP address and this website has an IP address. To browse this site, your browser has issued a request to this site's IP address to deliver this webpage to your browser at your IP address. This system was made for computers and it works well for them. Us humans, however, aren't so good with numbers - we want words. In order to appease us, some clever person came up with the idea of domain name resolution (can you see where this is going?). Domain name resolution is the process whereby a domain name such as yahoo.com is mapped to the IP address of the machine that is hosting the yahoo.com domain. The actual piece of software that does this is called a Domain Name Server (DNS). DNS's are located all over the internet and they all talk to each other to make sure they all have the same information. With this information we can now modify my previous example to this: your browser has issued a request to get the website content located at forums.techguy.org to a DNS server. The DNS server then tells your computer the IP address of forums.techguy.org and NOW your browser can request the page from this site. I hope that makes sense.

    2. Domain Name Parking: This concept was designed to be used for the short period of time between when someone buys a domain name and when they actually buy a hosting package and put something up on the net. If not for this service, then in that time period someone typing in your domain name would simply have to sit there and watch their browser time out because there are no DNS records to tell their browser where your site is located. Domain Name Parking essentially points your domain to your registrar (in most cases) so the user will see some kind of 'coming soon' page to give them confidence that they have the right address typed into their address bar. Only you know if this service is valuable for you. Some registrars automatically park domains you buy from them, some ask you if you want them to park it and some charge extra for it. If you intend to use this service, just make sure they offer it and you're OK with any conditions they have about it.

    3. Subdomains: This is the proper term for the concept of myname.com and thing.myname.com. Yes, to answer your question, anything ending in myname.com would be under your control. Domain names are actually read backwards. Consider www.yahoo.com: The DNS server first resolves the Top Level Domain (tld) of COM, it then looks under COM for an entry called YAHOO which has an IP address assigned to it. Before returning that IP address to you though, it looks to see if there is an entry under YAHOO named WWW. If so, it looks for an IP address assigned to the WWW entry and returns that IP address to you. It is by this process that a single domain can be hosted on many computers: www (under com -> yahoo) can have an IP address, ftp (under com -> yahoo) can have another, telnet (under com -> yahoo) can have another, etc ,etc. By this same token, a subdomain called 'thing' can be assigned an IP address and DNS queries to thing.yahoo.com would return the IP address of thing (under com -> yahoo).

    A note on subdomains - this is a feature offered by whomever you buy a hosting package from. If you intend to use subdomains, be sure they offer them. Many offer unlimited subdomains, or a certain number of subdomains included, but many others see this as a revenue opportunity and charge a fee for each subdomain.

    In short - the IP address and domain name (bound together by DNS) is your phone number and your hosting package is your phone. Unless you have both, no one can phone you.

    This was totally written off the top of my head so if it doesn't make sense, just post back and I'll clarify for you.
     
  7. rpndt1

    rpndt1 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Messages:
    66
    No, that was excellent. Thank you! :D
     
  8. Heatsink

    Heatsink

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    you're welcome :)
     
  9. etaf

    etaf Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2003
    Messages:
    65,120
    First Name:
    Wayne
    also make sure they register your name as admin.
    Some companies register on your behalf but they have there name as admin and if they go bust it can be difficult to get your domain.

    also look at the T&C's regading moving the domain - sometimes you pay a huge fee if you want to change ISP's

    also look into how the website would be updated - I company I dealt with you did not have access to the servers for any updates and had to do it though them...
     
  10. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Similar Threads - Registering domain
  1. Scott1000
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    331
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/325873

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice