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Repair Rotted Garage Door

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself (Not Computer-Related)' started by Space Cowboy, Nov 14, 2005.

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  1. Space Cowboy

    Space Cowboy Thread Starter

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    The bottom of my wood garage door is rotted so there is a gap that the cold can get in. I fixed it 15 years ago by taking some old production line rubber belt and wrapping it around the bottom and screwin it in on both sides but that has rotted and they want 3 grand for a new wood door. I don't want metal.

    Any idea's on how to fix it? There is about a 1 inch gap at the bottom and I've called this place twice to come out and fix it and they say they can't.

    Thanks
     
  2. Guyzer

    Guyzer

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    Depending how rotted it is you may consider some rubber belting usually found at farm implement dealers. Many times they have used stuff sitting in the corner that isn't being used. The width varies. It's commonly used in combines etc. I used it once on an old garage door. I managed to get some 4" wide stuff and used some lag bolts. Attached it to the inside bottom of the door when it was closed. Didn't look that great but it kept the draft and snow out.
     
  3. Space Cowboy

    Space Cowboy Thread Starter

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    I'm pretty sure it was 4" wide the first time I repaired it. Gonna need wider than that. And then there is that metal thing. Might get by with 6-8 inches wide?
     
  4. Mulderator

    Mulderator

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    Why not cut the wood out that's rotted (i.e., get to good wood! :eek: ) in a rectangular shape and then cut a new piece to fit in. You can drill holes at the bottom of the new piece to enable you to put long screws in to secure it to the door (then fill the holes later)--use wood glue also then sand it and paint the entire door--no one will ever know its not the same wood at the bottom.

    Wood is very easy to fix because it can be cut to exactly the shapes you need, sanded, formed, etc--its very forgiving--mistakes are easily fixed, which is good because I am impatient and usually make several mistakes on fix it projects so I end up fixing the mistakes and the original problem. But I always am able to get it fixed.
     
  5. Space Cowboy

    Space Cowboy Thread Starter

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    It's insulated and not solid. I don't think there would be anything to screw it to that would hold. Also it snowed here the other day so need a relatively quick fix.

    I'd like to just get the bottom panel replaced but for some reason the places I call say all they have is metal.

    I built a pen for Thor out in the garage and it just gets to cold with the draft. The garage is insulated.
     
  6. Mulderator

    Mulderator

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    This is what I envision (see pic)--the bottom of the door is rotted out, so you cut out a rectangular section and replace it with a piece the same size. Say that the height of the wood if stood up is 6 inches. Drill quarter inch holes (or bigger if necessary) about 4 and half inches or so deep, then smaller holes at least an inch into the old door and use long thick wood screws or lag bolts and to screw that piece of wood to the door--space them about two feet apart or less if not stable. I would also apply some sort of bracing (you can pick up metal braces at the hardware store at the end of the pieces of wood where it joins the door for lateral stability. Apply plenty of wood glue to the piece of wood and the door. When done, sand and paint. Should hold up fine.
     

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  7. Mulderator

    Mulderator

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    I got ya. You would still cut out a rectangle, but then you would put a piece of wood inside the paneled wood (where the insulation would go) far enough up to get good wood and all the way down to meet the bottom of the where the door would end and screw it to the paneled door--plenty of screws that won't go all the way through--then glue or screw some paneling to that piece of wood the same width to make the it match. Use plenty of glue, sand, and paint.

    A "quick" fix is a "half arsed" fix. Do it right the first time--it shouldn't take more than a few hours.
     
  8. Mulderator

    Mulderator

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    Below is the fix--one piece of wood (light weight)--the yellow part goes up into the paneled part of the door and the rest replaces the rotted out part. Then you apply paneling to the exposed part to make it the same width as the door.
     

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  9. hewee

    hewee It's My Birthday!

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    See post in coffee shop.
     
  10. ri7425ck

    ri7425ck

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    I dont know if you have the eq., a Table saw. Or maybe borrow one. Build a brand new bottom panel! Did it myself and it aint that hard! mostly 2x4 or 2x6 stock and maybe 1/2 " stock for the panels. Get busy with a ruler and draw up what you need! When you finish make sure you prime and paint it real well, and attach a split piece of garden hose to the bottom ( makes a great seal, and keeps the damp from the wood. ) When all else fails do it yourself!
     
  11. Steppinstone

    Steppinstone

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    How's the repair going SC?
     
  12. Space Cowboy

    Space Cowboy Thread Starter

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    HEy all.. I found another roll of that rubber production line trach 5" wide and just did a patch job for now. It seems to work great and I saw the same material at the hardware store for about $100 so I think I did good for now. Looks like the house is going up for sale soon so I'm trying to put as little in it as possible.

    Thanks For All The Suggestions.
     
  13. Guyzer

    Guyzer

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    I wonder who gave you the belting suggestion?;)
     
  14. jackrabbit

    jackrabbit

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    Try going to a machine shop and ask about an aluminum "C" channel that can be placed over the bottom edge of the door, then caulked with "Quad" caulk. Do not use silicon as this will come apart after a while and is not paintable. If Quad is too expensive or you can not find it as all the Quad caulk I use comes from a vinyle siding company, then any paintable caulk will do. Ask about having a track grooved into the bottom of the aluminum to accept standard weather stripping so it is easily replaced. I am sure it will cost a little, but is still cheaper than replacing the whole panel.

    This info comes to you from a reputable corporate building contractor, and not just some handyman wannabe. Good luck.
     
  15. apocalipsis07

    apocalipsis07

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    The best thing to do is buy a steel door that looks like wood. No body would know from the outside that is not wood. The best door in the market in my opinion are from Amarr

    Toby
    www.omegagaragedoorservice.com
     
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