Replacing laptop dc jack, solder won't melt..

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Deadsteam

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I'm not sure if anyone has experience with laptop soldering but here is the problem I am having. My dc jack on my laptop went dead, I ordered a new part, but have been unable to remove the old dc jack from the laptops motherboard. I have tried several soldering irons, up to 900 degres F and 50 watts.

The solder simply will not melt off of the contacts on the board.. any ideas? what could I be doing wrong?
 
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Wonder what were they thinking, using some material that won't melt with stock soldering iron temps... Actually it's quite self-clariant (Wonder if that's a real word :rolleyes:).. MORE PROFIT! You can't melt it, we can, we get your money. :p
Sorry for the useless post.
BTW: how long are you heating the solder with the iron? Are you sure you're using exactly the right spot of the iron to heat, holdding at the right spot of the solder?
 

Deadsteam

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Well, I am holding it in place for up to 2 minutes, I don't want to go longer and risk damaging the PCB.. I believe I am using the solder correctly, as I can melt the electronics solder that I purchased to re solder the new dc jack on the pcb..

I'm just very frustrated...

I am NOT buying a new mobo for $350...
 
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Ah, that should be more than enough.. It's just the temp being too low.. Post your laptop model, there could already be a solution to this one the net, could search how high does the temp have to be for the solder to melt.
 

Deadsteam

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Sure, It's a gateway mt something... 5461 or something liek that... :( I don't recall exactly, it's a gateway laptop retailed out of bestbuy about 18 months ago. it's amd x2 and a 120 gb hard drive ith intel integrated video..
 
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Well, as it doesn't melt it in 2 minutes and should really melt in less than 10 secs when used properly... There's little option other than that.. Do others agree?
But the fact is, I really can't find many irons with over 900 deg heat. Are the irons you're using totally/as much as poss. clean? Clean them with something mild.. No acids at least. Other thing, are they "sharp" or "chisel-type"?
 

Deadsteam

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Thanks for all your help so far!

In answer to your questions, they were brand new before I used them. I am trying to make sure they are clean and tinned but I have never done that before, I have tried both types of tips, chisel and pencil like.

Is it possible that it could have been soldered with Alluminum solder? that has a melting point of approx 1200 degrees..

hmm, I'm going to try one more time after cleaning-tinning...
 
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I really don't know... :eek: Someone with a bit more experience and knowledge on solders and soldering could give a hand here...
 

dustyjay

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For your electronic use, A soldering iron of 25 to 35 watts should be sufficient. More damage has been cause to ciruit boards using a soldering iron that applies too much heat. A 100 watt iron would be able to burn the glass substrate out from under the circuit traces. In other words Stick to a lower wattage iron. THe solder should melt at about 351 degrees F. On your DC Jack, does it have a metal mount that must be soldered in place as well as the electrical pins?
 

Deadsteam

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No, the replacement jack has only the pins. However, The issue is that the old broken jack is still stuck on my motherboard... the solder holding the pins of the old dc jack will not melt...
 
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For your electronic use, A soldering iron of 25 to 35 watts should be sufficient. More damage has been cause to ciruit boards using a soldering iron that applies too much heat. A 100 watt iron would be able to burn the glass substrate out from under the circuit traces. In other words Stick to a lower wattage iron. THe solder should melt at about 351 degrees F. On your DC Jack, does it have a metal mount that must be soldered in place as well as the electrical pins?
That's exactly what I would think, if it wasn't the solder not melting(quite mystically... :eek:)
 

mrss

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Come to think of it, I tried to unsolder a busted USB jack out of an accessory plate last summer. I couldn't get the stuff to melt either, and I have the tools and skill.

Manufacturers have been moving away from the leaded solder, and the replacement blends may be more tricky. No experience with them, as I got out of manufacturing eight years ago.

I'd make sure the tip of the iron is well tinned (shiny) with solder. If it's not tinned, it can't transfer any heat. You're using electrical solder with a rosin core flux? Sometimes, a little tin of solder flux (for electrical, not plumbing) will clean the joint on the board nicely when heated. If you do get it to melt, at work we would use a piece of copper braid to wick the solder out of the hole. Alternatively, we would use a solder sucker, sort of like a turkey baster, except it was spring loaded to vacuum up hot solder.






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