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Risks

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by redcash, Feb 11, 2007.

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  1. redcash

    redcash Thread Starter

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    I read a few things online about overclocking, but I still do not know what the risks are. Also, I have a front fan, side fan, rear fan, cpu fan, and a PCI fan. Should these keep it cool enough?
     
  2. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

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    The risks are that you will reduce the MTBF on the components (shorten their life, basically) due to the thermal stresses. But even more probable is that the system will be unstable.

    The number of fans is less important than the ability of the CPU heatsink-fan unit to adequately transfer the heat away from the CPU, only then will you need to worry about the number of fans to then disperse the heat from the case.

    The CPU watts of heat dissipated goes up disproportionately to the extra speed.
     
  3. maxibhoy

    maxibhoy

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    Well whether your fans will keep your rig cool enough depends on a number of things really. 1. Are they positioned correctly? 2. Are your cables neat and not bundled up in the middle of the case stopping airflow? 2. And are they quality fans?
    If you are sure all of these are done properly they should keep your rig cool enough. About the risk factor in overclocking. Many people think that there is a lot more risk in overclocking than there actually is. You might have heard the saying that you shouldn't overclock unless you can affoed to lose the components but in actual fact there isn't that great a risk and it is actually really hard to damage components overclocking. Increasing your fsb or multiplier cannot damage your system what can is raising the voltage on ANY component so always be extremely carefull when doing this and only ever increase it by the smallest of possible increments.
     
  4. maxibhoy

    maxibhoy

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    This is true but not much more thermal stress than you get from switching your pc on and off which is the no.1 way of wearing out your pc due to thermal stress.
     
  5. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

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    That was true of components in 1979, not so today.
     
  6. maxibhoy

    maxibhoy

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    Why that then?
     
  7. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

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    The technology has changed dramatically.
    The component manufacturing techniques have changed dramatically.
    The physical size (and the thermal effects from the changes) of components are now miniscule

    I recently was a manager for a large company, with many, many PC's and peripherals
    We always shut them down apart from a few, the failure rate due to this was nil for the ones shut down when compared.

    But in the '70's we had to keep them running (mainframes and terminals in those days) as the failure rate was real with frequent restarts.

    But the above only holds true while they are run within their design ratings. Overclocking takes them quickly outside those design parameters.
     
  8. maxibhoy

    maxibhoy

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    Hmmm........Yeah well i suppose what you say makes sense as i was taught this stuff (thermal stress) at college quite a while back. There must still be a degree of thermal stress from switching on and off a system as i imagine it would be impossible to eradicate but i certainly accept that it's no longer a problem to the degree that you would keep your computer on to avoid this. I also accept that overclocking would certainly cause thermal stress which was the reason why i singled out raising the voltage on your computers components as the main "risk" in overclocking.
     
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