Running a switch behind a router?

BRIANB22

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Hello everyone! I found this forums to hopefully help me with my situation.

as for some background,

I recently moved into my new house that has been pre wired for hardwired connections in several rooms, “office, family rooms, bedrooms, kitchen” however in my utility box conveniently placed in my master closet it is so cramped I have only ran the modem to the cable for my living room, then placed my router in the living room.

my issue, from the modem I can obviously just run the cable to the router located in the living room, but loose out on the other hardwired connections. Then run a WiFi extender ( as the WiFi won’t provide reliable signal at the opposite end.

my question I guess if you can make it through everything Else I have mentioned.

is there a way for me to utilize all hardwired connections as well as leave my router in the living room?

my thought was running a Ethernet switch from the modem for all other areas and then connect the router to the family room. However after some light googling it seems as that may not be possible?

TLDR: can I run a dumb switch from modem to several hardwired connections, with one output being to a router to supply WiFi.
 

zx10guy

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It's hard to conceptualize what you're intending to do. A wiring diagram would be most helpful in seeing exactly what you're intending on doing.
 

TerryNet

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If I'm correctly guessing your desire you want to run an ethernet cable from a router LAN port back to the closet and use a switch to connect the other ethernet runs.
 

crjdriver

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If what you are asking is if you can use a switch with a router, the answer is yes. In fact I do just that because I need more than the four hard wired connections.
This however is an area for concern
in my utility box conveniently placed in my master closet it is so cramped
You do understand that both a router and a modem generate heat. If the area is so small that you cannot fit a router in this area along with the modem, you are asking for heat damage. This is why both routers and modems have ventilated cases ie the need to dissipate heat.
 

BRIANB22

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I know it is hard to describe this via text. However let me attempt to do that.

the utility box is about 3 ft by 3 ft by about 5 inches deep. and ventilated. Heat was not a concern until now so thank you for bringing that up Crjdriver ( I’m a premier 1 driver BTW haha )

terrynet, my goal is to avoid running a cable back to the closet and instead have the closet box only using the cables currently provided running out.

back to CRJdriver, my goal is to run the switch to provide access to the multiple ports in the home, ideally allowing me to have internet access in my Office where the WiFi does not reach.

im on a mobile device now but my end goal is

modem in closet with service ran to 4 hardwired cables ran through the house. One of those being to the living room with the router.

Hope this helps. I’m confused even trying to convey the point I’m attempting to make.
 

BRIANB22

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On a side note. My current setup is modem in closet. The homes pre wired cable hooked directly into that. That cable ends in the living room where I have my router that has Apple TV / gaming system / etc. which is why I was trying to keep router in the living room with WiFi being better than running through all the walls and bathrooms between.
 

zx10guy

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When you say modem and cable, are you saying you have cable service and the cable in question where your modem is connected is a coax, RG6, cable? And then you have the Ethernet port of the modem connected to one of the LAN drops on a patch panel in your structured wiring cabinet that goes to your living room where you have your router connected to the RJ45 jack on a wall?
 

BRIANB22

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Sorry, the cable in question is cat cable that the home came pre wired with. I currently have the coax cable hooked into the modem as normal. Then I have the cat cable that is ran through the home from the closet to the living room hooked to the modem. In the living room the cat cable is hooked into my router from the RJ45 jack in the wall.
 

BRIANB22

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Attached is what I’m dealing with. Modem in the closet box. As you can hopefully see all the extra cat cables are ran through the house to the other RJ45 ports. Ideally I would like all of these to be utilized with my router in the living room.
I’m not the smartest tool in the shed but hopefully this helps! Sorry for the confusion everyone! I appreciate everyone taking the time to help!
 

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zx10guy

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So your setup is exactly what I said in my post.

Do you have another RJ45 LAN drop in the room where the router is? I assume no as you wouldn't be saying you would need to run a long patch cable from the router back to the structured wiring cabinet.
 

BRIANB22

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Sorry to repeat you. I guess I misspoke or misunderstood.

no I do not. Only the one in the living room.
 

TerryNet

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Maybe you want to replace the modem with a modem/router combo. It would probably include wireless capability, which you can turn off.

To do exactly what you described you would need to contract for 4 public IPs from your ISP (if they even offer that) and make sure the modem will handle 4 public IPs.
 

BRIANB22

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That’s what I was afraid of. And just out of curiosity. Seeing as I’m already asking so many questions. Can you run a router to another router? As in if I put a router/modem combo in there could I run a second router in the living room to support the WIFI Of the house? Or is that a dumb question lol.
Again I appreciate everyone’s help. Not quite sure why the house would be designed like that lol.
 

crjdriver

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You can however the second router would need to be config in bridge mode. Instead of a second router, why not just a wireless access point? Unless I am missing something, you just want the wireless from the second router.
 

zx10guy

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What's your budget?

This is what I would do. Move your router to where your modem is in the structured wiring cabinet. The ends of the Category cabling have been terminated which I see as a very common thing with structured wiring subs that don't have a clue about networking. What should have been done is to terminate the cables to a patch panel inside your structured wiring cabinet. It's better for reliability if the cable plant that is run through your walls are terminated into a patch panel. This will increase reliability as the only failure point would be any patch cables you use to plug into the patch panel. You'll need to contract this out if you don't want to attempt to do it yourself. I changed out what my builder's sub did in my structured wiring cabinet at my vacation home and put in a patch panel myself. Unfortunately, I don't have any pictures handy to show you what I did.

Whether you decide to install a patch panel or not, you would either use patch cables to plug into each LAN port in your router and then into the patch panel or just plug the already terminated cable ends into the LAN ports in your router. If you don't have enough ports on your router, this is where you would add a switch. Plug the cables for the LAN drops into the switch leaving one port available on the switch to connect directly to your router's LAN port.

For wireless, I would get a unified wireless system. This will mean having more than one access point. Two would be a minimum I would start out with. I don't know your home's layout or where you are having coverage issues. You might get lucky and be able to use one AP but have it connected in an area in your house that provides the best coverage for any wireless devices you have in your home. There are mesh systems you can use. I'm not sure how they would operate if they're hard wired to talk between them over a wired network versus over a wireless backbone. From what I have seen Ubiquiti seems to be the favorites for those looking for business class features at very affordable prices. My understanding is the GUI makes setting up their APs very easy. But this is assuming you still in fact need to have more than one AP in your home.
 

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