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Scandisk found damage.

Discussion in 'Earlier Versions of Windows' started by shinjots, Sep 2, 2004.

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  1. shinjots

    shinjots Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2003
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    My computer has been completely freezing up alot lately and I have to hold in the power button to reboot it. The last time I did this I received this......PXE-E61 Media test failed, check cable. No operating sustem found. Press F1 to reboot. And below that theres a picture of a floppy going into it's drive. So I reboot with a Windows ME startup disk and It stops and gives me this error message. Windows ME has determined that drive C does not contain a valid FAT or FAT 32 partition.
    1. The drive may need to be partitioned. To create a partition run Fdisk at the command prompt.
    2. You may be using third party disk partitioning software. If so remove emergency boot disk and restart your computer and follow instructions.
    3 Some viruses can cause drive C to not register. Use an anti-virus program.
    The diagnostic tools were successfully loaded to drive C.

    From here I opened the help file and followed the instructions. So I ran scandisk which says scandisk encountered a data error while reading the FAT on drive C. This error prevents scandisk from fixing this drive. So I ran scanreg/restore and was able to boot into Windows where I ran scandisk again. It only got to about 4% and gave me this diagnosis... The disk is seriously damaged and may need to be replaced. The damaged portion of the disk contains critical information about the location of some or all of the files on this drive. If you continue to use this drive you will probably encounter errors using many of the files on it and risk losing all the data on it....Then it goes on (after asking) to check the rest of the disk for errors. It gets so far and then freezes.
    It says the disk may need to be replaced which to me means that, well, it may not have to be replaced. So I have a few questions. Do I have any options or I should I just get a new hard drive? I also have alot of media files(music videos,downloaded games and stuff) that took me a long time to accumulate. Unfortunately I don't have a cd burner or cd-r drive, I'm not sure what you call it. Is there a way to save or even transfer these files to a new hard drive, if in fact I have to replace mine? Maybe I should also mention that in trying to resolve this, sometimes after restarting, Windows would just go into scandisk, which I'd have to cancel because it freezes, and then just load. Other times I'd get that no operating system screen and have to use the start up disk and use scanreg/restore. Thanks much for any input.
    P.S. (I guess) Just before submitting this I ran scandisk again, just out of curiosity, and it found no errors. But when trying to post this P.S, my screen went blue and said Disk Write Error. Unable to write to disk in drive C: Data or files may be lost. Press any key to continue... I hit a key and my computer froze again and I had to hold in the power button again and reboot.
     
  2. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Aug 1, 2003
    Messages:
    51,988
    This sounds definitely like a disk failure. The write error in particular may be the result of the drive not spinning at all. At that point, you are running on only what has loaded into memory.

    The only possible solution that I know of short of a new drive is Spinrite. It is possible that it may be able to save the drive data. But, the other side of the coin is that Spinrite can take 20 hours or more to effect its repairs, and that would no doubt bring an already failing drive to its demise.

    I'd suggest that you stop using that drive right away. Get yourself a new one and install an operating system. Put the old drive in as a secondary and just keep trying to access it and copy your files over to the new drive. This may require rebooting many times if the drive stops while you are trying to copy, but you may just be lucky and get it all copied.

    I could be wrong about all of this, of course, and the situation may not be that dire. But the question is, "What if I'm right?" You could end up causing yourself a complete loss of everything on the drive in wasting time trying to fix it. If I am wrong, you can format that drive after you have all your data safe, reinstall an operating system, and probably even return the new drive you bought unless you want storage space or a backup.
     
  3. shinjots

    shinjots Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2003
    Messages:
    7
    I posted this same thing on another forum just so I could get a few opinions and they said the same thing, so I'd say your right. But, could you tell me how to do the rest. I mean when I install a new drive and go under my computer will there be the original c: drive and then the new one under a different letter or what? Also this computer never had windows to start with. I took it to a place and they installed Windows ME with the upgrade version is there anything special I need to know about installing ME with the upgrade version? Finally when transferring files from one to the other drive... well how do you do that? Is it a drag and drop type thing? Thanks, I appreciate it.
     
  4. Elvandil

    Elvandil

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2003
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    51,988
    If you have an upgrade version of Windows ME, then you have the full version. The only difference is that when you install it, they want you to prove that you are actually eligible for an upgrade by inserting a CD for a "qualifying product". That would mean an old Win98 or 95 CD. If you don't have one, perhaps you could borrow one for this procedure.

    When you get the new drive (or even right away to prevent any further damage), take out your present drive. You will notice when you remove it that it is on a cable that has 2 connectors, only one of which is connected to your drive.

    When you get the new drive, look on the end where the connector is. You will see a small palstic jumper and there will be a map somewhere on the drive that will tell you where to put that jumper to make the drive a master. It will probably already be set as master when you get it.

    Put the new drive in just the way the old one was. Install ME to it.

    After ME is all installed, take the old drive and look at the jumper. It will need to be in the slave position. Connect it to the second connector on that ribbon cable, connect the power (a 4-wire plug that you will see on your drive when you remove it).

    Boot from a startup floppy and delete all the files in the root directory of the old drive.

    Boot into ME and look in My Computer to see if your old drive is visible. If it is, click on it, find your old files, and drag and drop them to your new drive.

    There will need to be more details in these instructions, to be sure, so come back and we will direct you step-by-step and hopefully, we can get your stuff back :D.
     
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