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Second router access point without cutting speeds

Discussion in 'Networking' started by rsherman, Jul 13, 2017.

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  1. rsherman

    rsherman Thread Starter

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    I have a linksys E3000 and I'm trying to use it as a second access point to my existing comcast network. Currently it is setup to copy the network security settings and I disabled the Linksys router's DHCP server. I have the routers hooked up LAN to LAN (about 50 feet through my basement). This works as a simple repeater but it has cut my wireless network speeds. I'm wondering how I can do something similar without cutting my WiFi speed. For reference I get 100-170 download with my computer plugged into the Linksys router and 20-50 over WiFi. I know almost nothing about networking so some help would be great
     
  2. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor

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    That's about all youre going to get over the wifi, atleast on the 2.4ghz. 2.4ghz wifi maxes out at 54mbps. To go higher you would need a 5ghz network, but at 50feet 5ghz is going to poor signal, which will result in slow speeds.
     
  3. rsherman

    rsherman Thread Starter

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    So the 50ft is just the length of an ethernet cable running from my comcast to my linksys router. The linksys router is in the same room as me (maybe 10 feet away) and it broadcasts both 2.4 and 5GHz. My problem is that when you do an access point like I have you half your WiFi speeds. Something about a half duplex... I don't know much of anything about networking
     
  4. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor

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    Duplex has to do with the Ethernet, not wireless.

    The purpose of said AP is to boost the wireless range?
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Uh, I think there may be some miscommunication here.

    802.11g maxes out at 54 Mbps theoretical, and the highest actual data throughput will be about half that. 802.11n maxes out at 300 Mbps, and I don't know what the highest actual data throughput is, but my guess is about half that. There's also a version (I call it "half n") that maxes at 150 Mbps theoretical. 802.11g and 802.11n are 2.4 GHz.

    Using a wireless access point will not slow the speed. Using a Repeater (Range Extender) will slow the network.

    And, yes, (all) Wi-Fi is half duplex. And only one device can be (successfully) broadcasting at a time, which is why just a few devices trying for simultaneous use can bring a network to a crawl.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    What wireless adapter are you using when you get the 20 - 50 Mbps?

    Any other networks potentially giving wireless interference? Any obstacles in the path from router to adapter's antenna? (Some people put the antenna in a corner or "hide" it behind the computer if a desktop.)
     
  7. rsherman

    rsherman Thread Starter

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    no, no obstacles. Ive read online that making an access point like i did will cut both routers wifi speed so i was hoping someone knew how to set it up so that that doesnt happen
     
  8. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    To clarify some more. 802.11n actually maxes out at 450 Mbps. This is due to the higher end APs supporting 3x3 operation for the number of spatial streams. This equates to 150 Mbps per spatial stream. 802.11n can also run in the 5GHz space. So it's not exclusively 2.4.
     
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  9. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    We don't know how you set it up nor what you read online. Troubles (at least some of them) that can arise when you use multiple wireless access points are

    a. they interfere with each other if the channels are not properly spaced;
    b. if you use the same SSID a device may connect to a "wrong" (weaker signal) one;
    c. a device may continually drop its connection and then connect to a different signal.

    To avoid (a) use non-interfering channels (can be complicated to impossible if there are more than three 2.4 GHz networks, including yours). This is the only issue that I can think of that actually slows network performance. The others just slow the device, not the network.

    To avoid (b) or (c) use different SSIDs and allow the device to connect to only the desired network. This solution, of course, kills "roaming," which is the reason many people use multiple wireless access points.
     
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