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Security on shared Network

Discussion in 'General Security' started by PDX2019, Sep 25, 2019.

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  1. PDX2019

    PDX2019 Thread Starter

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    My apartment building offers free wifi to it's tenants. I believe it is a secured network as I'm required to use a password (provided by the Management) to log in. My concern is that there are over 50 users (some live here and some don't) utilizing this free network. Several people in the neighborhood have the password, Since I've been using this free network both my laptop and cell phone do not act as they once did. SHOULD I be using this free network? The free fits my low income. WHAT should I do to protect my laptop and cell phone if i do use this free network? Laptop info. is below.

    Thank you


    Tech Support Guy System Info Utility version 1.0.0.4
    OS Version: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional, Service Pack 1, 64 bit
    Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU M 330 @ 2.13GHz, Intel64 Family 6 Model 37 Stepping 2
    Processor Count: 4
    RAM: 3892 Mb
    Graphics Card: Intel(R) Graphics Media Accelerator HD, 1722 Mb
    Hard Drives: C: 454 GB (357 GB Free); Q: 9 GB (0 GB Free);
    Motherboard: LENOVO, 057826U
    Antivirus: Avira Antivirus, Enabled and Updated
     
  2. jackpeej

    jackpeej

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    Have you done research into a VPN perhaps?
     
  3. lunarlander

    lunarlander

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    VPN service has nothing to do with securing your PC, it only protects your privacy as it hides your web travels. That's all.

    Don't let terms like 'encryption' fool you, the purpose of encryption is to keep things private so other people cannot look at it. It is a security thing, but each thing has a protection purpose, and it only does that one thing. It does nothing to secure you from hackers attacking your PC. It does nothing to prevent a download from infecting your PC. It does nothing to prevent someone from disrupting your surfing.

    You are using a PUBLIC network, anyone with the public WiFi password can access your PC because you are connected to the same network without a router firewall to block him. That is the first thing you have to address. If your apartment also has a ethernet jack in the wall, then plug a router into that and use that router's WiFi or cable connection.

    If you don't have an ethernet jack. Then you will have to at least turn off all the green rules in the incoming tab of the Windows Defender Firewall with Advanced Security. You can find it under Administrative Tools in the Start menu. That is the first and easiest step towards securing your laptop in a public WiFi/network.
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    This is what I do with any type of public WiFi type environment. I have a specific ultramobile PC I use that connects to the public hot spot. This ultramobile PC is running ICS (Internet Connection Sharing). I then share out the public connection to my attached devices from this ultramobile PC. The system I use is a bit more complicated than what I'm sharing as there's a device which hangs off of the Ethernet jack on the ultramobile PC that establishes a secure tunnel back to my home network. The device allows both Ethernet connectivity and WiFi.

    But the above principles can apply in your situation. The ultramobile PC I run is meant to be burned or allowed to be at risk. I run a utility called Deep Freeze on it which restores the baseline image of the system every time it boots up. This along with running Windows Firewall has kept things secure for me.
     
  5. lunarlander

    lunarlander

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    In line with Deep Freeze suggested by zx10guy, there is another program called Shadow Defender, does the same thing, which used to be free, but may no longer be. But it ischeaper than Deep Freeze, and doesn't need yearly subscription. https://www.shadowdefender.com/download.html
     
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Clarification on Deep Freeze. The yearly subscription is only to get updates to the software. You do not lose functionality with the software when you're out of maintenance. I'm sticking with Deep Freeze because they've been around forever and have provided regular patch updates. To me it's worth spending the money on. I have instances of Deep Freeze installed on some older devices which have been running fine for years. I don't intend on upgrading the OS on these devices so they don't need the regular patch updates.
     
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