server/client

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jaye944

Thread Starter
Joined
Mar 3, 2004
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1,580
what "Makes" a server a server, and a client a client.

In other words, what would you expect to see running (software wise)

If you had say

XP
2000
NT

if somone asked you "is that a server or a client" how could you tell ?

cheers
 

Anne Troy

Anne
Joined
Feb 14, 1999
Messages
11,749
That depends. But, in general:

Server software is to be run on a server. Windows 2000 Server, Windows NT Server (Is there an XP? I'm not sure, but it sounds wrong.)

Now, the client would run Windows 2000 (a "professional" operating system) or Windows ME (a "home" OS) or Windows XP Home or Windows XP Pro or Win 98 (there was never a server edition of that).

For OS's, there are NT and there are non-NT. The NT is generally the "professional" edition, like Windows XP Pro. Windows 98 was the "home" edition and Windows NT 4 was the "pro" edition.

A mail client is MS Outlook.
A mail server is MS Exchange Server.

A server is a machine in a dark, dusty closet somewhere, usually at work.
A client is the PCs that all the employees use.

You might have your own server at home tho, if you're a techno-geek. That would mean--generally--that you don't keep all your files on your PC, but on the server.

Servers have CPUs just like a regular PC. However, I'm sure it's desirable for them to be more powerful.

Some people have print servers. That would be a PC that's dedicated strictly to processing jobs to a printer--generally at Kinko's and other printhouses, they'll have print servers that run special software.

Most of the keyboarding that would be done at a server is setup kind of stuff. Rarely would someone sit and type up a document on a server.

Am I understanding your question? Giving enough info?
 

jaye944

Thread Starter
Joined
Mar 3, 2004
Messages
1,580
hey dreamboat,
sorry for delay in replying,

well not exactly...

say, you were in front of a PC screen.

and had already been logged on. the user ask's 2 questions

"How do I know if this is a server ?"
"Whats the difference between a server and a client?"

so in possibly 4 steps, what would you do in order to ascertain the PC you were logged onto was a server ?

and in a clear easy to understand statement, explain the latter

cheers

jaye
 

Squashman

Retired Trusted Advisor
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Apr 4, 2003
Messages
19,786
Any network admin who has half a brain would never let you sit down in front of his server. The only people who should have physical access to a server is the Network Admin. I doubt you will ever sit down in front of one unless you become a network admin.

If you right click My Computer and select properties, it will tell you what OS you are running.
 

Anne Troy

Anne
Joined
Feb 14, 1999
Messages
11,749
Actually, on my old PC (I think, 'cause I can't find it on this one), there was a setting whether the machine was being used as a server or (can't remember if the other option was client or something else).

So, I have a feeling that jaye is looking for that.
 

Squashman

Retired Trusted Advisor
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Messages
19,786
I guess you could call a pc a server if you are running File Sharing on it.
 
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