1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Setting up a wired Home Network while building a house

Discussion in 'Networking' started by AhrenBa, Jul 21, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. AhrenBa

    AhrenBa Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    884
    Hey,
    I am building a new house right now and really would like it wired for ethernet so that I can network my computers. Ethernet is Cat5e right? Anyways, how does it work when you have a wired network? Is it like that a separate wire much go each separate location while they all meet at one location where the router is? I mainly just want to share dsl/cable connections. So, basically what is a simple way I could explain to my electricians to wire my rooms and house for ethernet. Thanks
     
  2. StumpedTechy

    StumpedTechy

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    7,234
    I am not sure if you want to have electricians running your network cabling...

    With that being said with cat 5e you will be able to run most standard ethernet configurations. Personally I would say go with catergory 6 or even 7 cableing for "futureproofing" but note that 7 is still under construcution as far as standards so if you get 7 now it may not work with something that will only work with cat-7 of the new definitions in the future.

    This is a good site that has alot of definitions and gives you the basis on what the wiring is. http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutorial.asp

    Also another thing is you want to ensure to run more than 1 cable to a room and think about location in relation to furniture layouts. (The more than one cable is a benifit because you can acutally use one cable for phone wiring and stuff if you want to or have 2 computers without have to have a switch or a hub.

    Each line has to be seperate you can not "chain" 1 drop a line another drop more line and a third drop. I.E. If room 1 has 3 drops and room 2 has 2 drops and room 3 has 1 drop that should be 6 drops at the site of your patch panel not 3 at the patch panel and they are all chained (this is not similar to electrical work).

    Have all network cables going to one central patch panel in a closet or space where you want to have you incoming internet signal also make sure this space is big enough in case you want to put any type of media server or anything in it as well.

    Make sure all drops are nicely labeled at each end for easy future problem diagnosis.

    DO NOT allow your cables to be placed in places where you might get EMF interferance (over main electrical boxes, and incoming power lines).

    Make sure the network cables are all tested prior to the drywall going up.
     
  3. AhrenBa

    AhrenBa Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    884
    Ok, thanks. So when I run the wire, should both ends of the cable be male or..... And what you were saying is that there must be a separate cable when going to a new location, right? Thanks again
     
  4. StumpedTechy

    StumpedTechy

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    7,234
    Nooooo - when running it in the house you want both ends to be female you want to have a female jack in the wall to plug a standard patch cord into (from the PC or other network device) and you want to have a female jack on your patch panel (All I have ever seen are patch panels that have female jacks) I always recommend going to a patch panel because having a bunch of wall jacks in one spot looks fairly bad a nice neat organized panel looks and functions better.

    1) Get female wall jacks label each jack with some mneumonic like label the first one in a room FR1, LR1, MB1, or whatever you want FR for family room LR for living room MB for master bedroom and so fourth 1 means its the first jack in the room. so then you can increment it up lets say you have 6 jacks in one room you would have MB1, MB2, MB3 and so fourth.
    2) Then run the cat 6 wiring from the wall jack to the patch panel label each side of the wire with the same mneumonic that you used on the wall jack (far enough back to allow you some slack to work with the wiring and punchdown).
    3) Repeat steps 1 and 2 for all network drops you want in all rooms.
    4) At the patch panel punch down all rooms into the panel (Usually I put them in some kind of easy order to quickly get to the part of the house you need to be at)
    5) Then once built you have a patch cable from the PC or other network device to the wall jack, then this feeds to the patch panel where you have another patch cord going into something like a router or a switch.
     
  5. AhrenBa

    AhrenBa Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    884
    Ok, I think I pretty much got it. Tell me if I am on the right track.
    1. plug internet into DSL/cable modem

    2. then plug a cable into the router from the modem

    3. make a female wall outlet with like 4 jacks

    4. run each of the 4 cables (one from each jack) into each room you want ethernet to.

    5. put a female outlet in each room and hook up the cable to that.

    6. plug in a cable from the router to the jack(s) which will run it up to the other end of the cable (lets say router is downstairs and other end of cable is upstairs in a room with a female jack)

    7. plug into the upstairs jack with a cable that connects to the computer.

    Does that sound right? If not could you try to explain it again, or point me to a tutorial site. Thanks again very much for you help.
     
  6. AhrenBa

    AhrenBa Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    884
    Oh and also, what exactly is a patch panel and how does it work? What is the difference of that and a normal female jack. Thanks
     
  7. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2002
    Messages:
    106,418
    You need to pick a common point where you'll install your distribution. It doesn't have to be where you'll have computers, or even your broadband modem. As long as you run ALL the wires to this common location, and there's power for a Ethernet switch, you'll have the flexibility to configure the network later. Each location should be a home-run directly between the remote location and the common distribution point. NO DAISY CHAIN CONNECTIONS LIKE PHONE WIRING! There should be no break in the wire from end to end.
     
  8. AhrenBa

    AhrenBa Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    884
    Thank you! That makes it all so much more easier now, and I finally understand. The only thing I am still unsure on is patch panels. When you have all the cables meeting at one point (lets say in a basment) they will be raw with no connecters on it. Is that what a patch panel is? Can you connect the raw wires directly to it. If so, what do you use to get the connection(s) to the hub or router? Thanks, if its easier, just explain exactly how a patch panel works. thanks a ton
     
  9. StumpedTechy

    StumpedTechy

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    7,234
    Basically say in the basement you have all the wires to all of your drops (labeled of course on the end like I said). a patch panel is basically a panel that has rows of female network connectors on it on the back is the "punchdown" area and you punchdown the cord's wires to the corresponding place you want it on the patch panel. this leaves you with all the cords going to the 1 panel and all cords having a female rj-45 connection. Then you simply take a patch cable (the same time you use to hook a PC to the wall jack) and you run that from the patch panel to the switch or router. this is why you ALWAYS want to have your patch panel in the same area your going to have your switch or router.

    There is ONE exception. I have seen where people have a switch in one part of the house by the patch panel and the router in a totally different room. What you do in that scenario is have all of your patches run into the switch but at the patch panel - which ever room you have your router in - that patch cord has to then go into your uplink of your switch.

    So basically you can have

    PC - Patch cord - Wall jack - internal wiring - patch panel jack - patch cable - switch -patch cable - router - patch cable - modem - cableline/phoneline

    or you can have

    PC - Patch cord - Wall jack - internal wiring - patch panel jack - patch cable - switch - patch cable from switch uplink back to patch panel (seperate port on the patch panel from the original) - internal wiring - wall jack in another area of the house - patch cable - router - patch cable - modem - cableline/phoneline

    Either of these 2 scenarios will work but I will say right now the EASIEST by far is just below the patch panel have a power outlet with a small battery backup (to power the switch and the router and the modem) a phone line or a cable line drop and just have it all in the one spot. This frees up the rest of your house to not be "network heaven"

    Some people do in wall patch panels and others like to use the 19 inch racks IMHO thats all either or. I will indicate that you want it in a closed off area but leave it with cirulation I.E. a door with a vent at the bottom and make sure there is A/C into that room (since it will have switches and electrical components).
     
  10. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2003
    Messages:
    19,783
    Most of the major Electrical contractors in my area are also certified for Data cabling as well.
     
  11. StumpedTechy

    StumpedTechy

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    7,234
    Okay let me reittearte myself a little more clearly ---- NOOOOOOOOOO don't let billy joe bob slap a cable up against his electrical cableing and say "there yare yous gots yourself some mighty fine data cablin". Make sure its someone certified and or experienced with data cables. :)
     
  12. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/383115

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice