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Shadow Problem in Photos...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by go4saket, Jul 15, 2007.

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  1. go4saket

    go4saket Thread Starter

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    Hello friends!

    I have a Sony Cybershot DSC-P200. I have a small problem. Although the camera takes superb pictures, each and every snap taken inside the house has a shadow behind the subject. I have tried clicking photos from all angles, but the shadow problem still persists. Is this because of some camera fault or because of my photography fault. Please refer the photograph below and help.

    Thank you.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    As some of you guys complained that the photos are not visible, I am also including the link t the same...
    http://www.geocities.com/go4saket/images/digit_forum/shaurya_0213.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/go4saket/images/digit_forum/shaurya_0266.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/go4saket/images/digit_forum/shaurya_0270.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/go4saket/images/digit_forum/shaurya_0282.jpg
     
  2. wilson44512

    wilson44512

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    is there a way to post one of the pics? so the shadow can be seen?
     
  3. lavazza

    lavazza

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    That's odd... I could see four photos, all with shadows at angle of about 3 or degrees out of line with the lens

    Anyhow

    If you have a 'slave flash' on a bracket (like the one in this pic) it could be that the bracket is not aligned properly and creating a shadow that is not 'directly behind' the subject
     
  4. slipe

    slipe

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    I can’t see the pictures either with IE 7.

    That is a nice camera. It is one of the few small cameras without a bad red-eye problem. That is because the flash is further away from the lens than most. The downside of that is that you get more shadow.

    That is a problem with all cameras with built-in flashes. You just have to be aware of the background and try to avoid sharp shadows. I have a camera with a flash attachment and diffuser that isn’t a problem, but otherwise I always have to be aware of the background.

    Sony moderates the problem a little in the P200 by having a 1/30 flash sync. That lets the shadows be a little less severe and lets in more background light compared to the standard 1/60. It is more prone to ghosts though if something is moving.
     
  5. telecom69

    telecom69 Gone but never forgotten

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    Its strange indeed about the missing pics in post#1 in IE7 all I could see was 4 boxes with red crosses in them,so I tried firefox and saw nothing at all ....

    Update : I have now gone back to using IE7 and can see all 4 pics :confused: :D

    Im wondering if he was using the camera flash or a floodlight of some sort,the photos do seem to be very brightly lit for a camera flash...
     
  6. go4saket

    go4saket Thread Starter

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    No, the camera has a build in camera and so cannot be adjusted...

    Sorry, but I couldnt understand what actually you mean to say. moreover, is it possible to do the same by yourself.

    No sir, I am using a buildin flash of the camera.
     
  7. buck52

    buck52 Banned

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    try turning the flash off
     
  8. go4saket

    go4saket Thread Starter

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    How am I supposed to take pictures in low light with flash turned off...
     
  9. buck52

    buck52 Banned

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    slow the shutter speed and use a tripod

    trouble with that is subject movement
     
  10. Knotbored

    Knotbored

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    I see the pictures, and see the shadows.
    Try taking the pictures with the camera turned 90 degrees so the shadow is at the bottom (flash above the lens.)
    Note-I seldom use a flash even in questionable lighting unless there is motion. Most of the pictures can be fixed for colors with editing software. Also folks hate the flash, and many more snapshots don't look as "composed" if you just snap away. I make photos for reminders of good times, not as art, and digital allows me to throw away all the pictures that don't show the emotions I wanted.
     
  11. wilson44512

    wilson44512

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    when your taking the pictures. is there another light source in the room? like a lamp?
     
  12. slipe

    slipe

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    The only practical way to take pictures of kids indoors using that camera is with a flash. Otherwise you get mostly blur. You can’t crank the ISO up and you don’t have a fast lens. A tripod and lighting might be appropriate for a posed portrait, but indoor candid shots of a rugrat without flash just don’t work unless the kid is exceptionally placid or the light is exceptionally bright.

    You will reduce the shadows a little following Knotbored’s suggestion to hold the camera vertically. Be sure to have the flash higher than the lens as he suggests.

    As far as I know you can shoot flash with any shutter speed you choose in manual mode. But anything lower than 1/30 is likely to give ghosts and anything higher will make the shadows a little stronger. Many experienced users preferred 1/60 in bright lighting to cut down on ghosts. Many inexperienced users just complained about the slow flash sync speed.

    If the flash failed to fire you would still get an image. The slower the shutter speed the more light you would let in and the brighter the image would be without the flash. So when you use a slow shutter speed you get a brighter background. But if the target is moving in bright light you can get two images. One frozen with the flash and the other weaker image with motion blur. They usually refer to that secondary image as a ghost because that is sort of what it looks like.
     
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