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Single User SQL on an XP Machine?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Cams, Oct 3, 2006.

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  1. Cams

    Cams Thread Starter

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    I'm helping a small business with a new software application that requires an SQL environment with either Windows 2000 or 2003. The application will not require networking and will be utilized by a single user. They currently run a UNIX based network server called a chilibox and are very happy with it. The application user is running an XP Pro machine. What is the easiest way to make the single user SQL environment? Can I create it on her current workstation?

    Many thanks
     
  2. O111111O

    O111111O

    Joined:
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    I figured somebody would answer this by now.

    If I recall, there's a single user SQL from Microsoft that's a "desktop edition"
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinfo/previousversions/msde/prodinfo.mspx

    Of course, now that I've read this, it appears that they're canning this for Vista.

    In the mean time, you should be able to use the MSDE engine. Not the fastest, but if it's single user it's probably ok.

    Having said that, using SQL etc has some caveats.

    1] Whatever the XP system has now, it'll probably need more memory to perform satisfactory.
    2] You need to protect the system and filesystems/database from being shutdown abnormally. They need to be queiesced. This means the system needs a UPS of some form. Something that will keep it up long enough to shutdown gracefully.
     
  3. Cams

    Cams Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
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    Hi,

    Thanks for the reply. It turns out that now it will probably be networked between two people. Below are the recommended specs from the software provider. I want to keep the current neywork Chilibox (unix) environment and add this piece. Can I do that or should I build a single off-network stand-alone workstation that can be used by one at a time. I have never worked with SQL or NT and I hope the curve is not too steep.

    Thanks


    This what the application provider recommends:

    Recommended SQL Server Specifications:
    o Processor: Pentium III, 500 MHz (Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Service Pack 3 or higher)
    o Memory: 512 MB RAM
    o Hard Drive/Storage: Two 4+ GB SCSI Hard Drives: one for the NT Operating System and
    device backups, the other for database devices and Microsoft SQL Server
    Note: The server should be dedicated as the SQL Server.

    File and Print Server (Network) Operating System
    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition

    Application Server
    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
    • Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition
    • Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Service Pack 3 or higher
     
  4. O111111O

    O111111O

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
    Messages:
    894
    Well, from a LAN perspective you should be able to keep them all on the same LAN. If you insert your Unix system into a LAN, previous console access (i.e. direct screen 0:0) with a VTY / PTY interface.

    I would venture to say that you should be able to run the app on your "chilibox" remotely, be it via X session or terminal emulation. You probably want to test this before you commit yourself to that (download a demo copy of SecureCRT if it's simply terminal emulation)

    You'll probably end up with a couple of client systems (WinXP), a SQL/app server, and your Unix system.

    For you SQL/App. Hopefully you can keep both on same system. I would suggest you spec a system that'll support RAID (SCSI). Based on those requirements you should very easily be able to find a system with 2 18GB 10KRPM SCSI drives. Partition the system volume (drive C) as 8 GB, and partition the rest for your SQL server/application.

    SQL isn't that bad. Microsoft did a decent job with some of the administration. Keep your database / logs in seperate directores. Backup database / transaction logs daily.

    --------

    All said, a couple of $800 workstations, a $250 switch, and maybe $4-8k on hardware for your SQL server (Sorry, it's expensive - but do it right the first time) will get you where you want to be.
     
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