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Slow transfer speeds

Discussion in 'Networking' started by blcArmadillo, Feb 13, 2008.

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  1. blcArmadillo

    blcArmadillo Thread Starter

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    I'm doing a network for a small business. All the computers are on a domain and the domain controller is running on the server. I'm also trying to setup Active Directory so that users can login to their account at any of the six workstations in the building. However, for some reason I'm only getting ~46kb/s transfer rates across the network which is obviously pathetic. Consequently, Active Directory is impossible to do right now as there is no way to sync large amounts of files with such a slow transfer speed. I've included in the image below a rough sketch of how the network is laid out. Do any of you have any ideas as to why everything is going so slow?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

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    Not sure about the network slowdown but you could have a bad nic in one of the computers that is flooding the network. I would download Wireshark and start sniffing the network to see what is going on.

    I do have one question for you. Why are you double natting your connection to the Internet. I personally would just make the Linksys act as a switch and Wireless AP.
     
  3. blcArmadillo

    blcArmadillo Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the quick reply squashman. The main reason we're using both the linksys and switch is because the person I'm installing this for wants wireless internet access for his laptop and the linksys doesn't have enough ports to support the six wired workstations, plus when we wired the building we put in aprox. three times as many ports as needed to allow for expansion. If anyone else has any ideas please let me know.
     
  4. jmwills

    jmwills

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    Shut down the stations one by one and see if the issue goes away. You only have 6 so this should not take long.
     
  5. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    As far as the double NAT, you can have the wireless capability and eliminate the second NAT layer too.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).
     
  6. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

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    How many ports does the Dell Power Connect have? Doesn't the SMC have switch ports as well? If you are not using a port, because you only have six computers then do what Johnwill posted. I see no issue with doing this, but that is just me. I like to setup things efficiently.
     
  7. blcArmadillo

    blcArmadillo Thread Starter

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    Thank you all for your suggestions I'll try them out to see if any help. In response to Squashman's question of why not get rid of the switch; Since we wired a ton more ports throughout the building so that in the future you can plug in more computers, there are not nearly enough on the SMC and Linksys combined to handle all of these cables and we don't want to have to reconfigure the entire later when they decide to expand.
     
  8. Wanderer2

    Wanderer2

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    Your setup is excellent and for any corporate environment double nat is a minimum. This is because the stratagy is to monitor both and provide you time to note if router1 has been compromised before router2 is hacked.

    The only exception is the unmanaged switch. A bad nic could do broadcasts. You have no broadcast control in a unmanaged switch. You also don't have the ability to look at port stats which may include errors making a problem nic easy to identify. You also don't have the abiltiy to see if autonegociation between nic and switch port was correct. Not uncommon to have the nic at full duplex but port is at half which causes errors.

    Usual first step is to set all nics at full duplex and full speed not autonegociate. Reboot and see if this fixes your issue.
     
  9. blcArmadillo

    blcArmadillo Thread Starter

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    Thanks Wanderer2 for the reply. So, would you suggest putting the switch into managed mode?
     
  10. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

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    I am all for security but using two SOHO routers isn't security. I have never heard a single person in my 10 years of experience tell me that double nat is a minimum. The best security would be to have a true hardware firewall in place. But for 6 computers I personally don't think there is a cost justification for that.

    You don't need to get rid of any of the switches. You can have them all linked together. I personally would link both the wireless and the large switch to the main router. I would never in a million years do double natting. Good luck with that when you need to start accessing your internal network from the outside. I have said my peace with that.
     
  11. Wanderer2

    Wanderer2

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    blcArmadillo you have to buy a managed switch. You can not turn a unmanaged switch into a managed one.

    Did you try the settting the nics from autonegociate?

    Squashman, what can I say? No mention of two soho routers, just a modem and a wireless router according to the diagam. Perhaps the modem can also route but what does that have to do with lan transfers? It doesn't. Guess I only purchase routers with SPI/Firewall features and double nat/firewalls IS an industry standard. Have a great day.
     
  12. blcArmadillo

    blcArmadillo Thread Starter

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    Thanks guys for your feedback. Squashman you bring up a good point when you say:
    One of the things we've been trying to get to work is remote desktop. It works perfectly internally but as you mentioned doesn't work at all when trying to access it from outside the lan. Do you think this problem would be solved if I did what JohnWill suggested?
    Also, Wanderer 2 I'm not sure that your statement:
    is true. On the switch there is a button that you press labeled "Managed" and when you do this a little LED turns on next to another label that says "Managed" and then I can gain access to a WebUI. When I press that button again it goes into unmanaged mode as far as I understand.
     
  13. Wanderer2

    Wanderer2

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    :) then its a managed switch. Dell just gave you a switch to turn it off or on. You want to leave it in managed mode. What are the port stats on the ports with pc/server connections?

    Concerning RDP do you get a static ip from your isp? Port 3389 open on the router?

    We use a vpn capable router for our remote access to the company's network and Citrix [terminal services] which gives better performance.
     
  14. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    The whole point of eliminating the switch was to reduce the failure points. Since all the local traffic never makes it to the router's local transfers have to be getting slowed down by the machines or the switch. The obvious debugging step is to eliminate the switch.

    Also, for seven (or even a few more) computers, going to a managed switch isn't really warranted unless you have money you don't know what to do with. I agree when you get into a sizable network, then better diagnostics are an important feature.
     
  15. Wanderer2

    Wanderer2

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    That certainly is a good point though since it is a managed switch it would be better to diagnose the issue using the management interface.

    blcArmadillo do you see errors on the pc/server connected ports?
    Have you set the nics to not autonegociate?
     
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