Slow WI FI from Access point despite good speed from router

Horsley

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Jul 12, 2020
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I have a desk top hard wired with a cat5e cable to a router. A speed test consistently shows 500BM/s on the desk top and we have good speed on all the other hard wired computers in the house.
I have a TP Link single band access point, capable of 450 MB/s at 2.4 HGz ( acording the TP Link) . I have tried the access point on set to Auto and on 40Hz / Channels 1, 6 and 11 as TP link advise and checked it is set to ' Access Point' in the settings. but with the access point plugged into the same cable that provides 500MB/s to the desk top, I am getting between 7 MB/s and 25 MN/s via WI-Fi on a phone and 2 different lap tops. I could buy a dual band access point but don't know if the speed at 2.4GHz would be much better. Does anyone have any idea if a single band access point should give WI Fi speed of say 70MB/s + (which would be fine) given I know the cable is delivering 500MB on a hard wired machine. . If I buy a dual band access point, will it solvable the problem or are there set up or other issues i don't understand to get right first before buying another access points. Because this WI-FI speed is so slow in comparison to the hard wired , I am thinking there might be more to this than just buying anther access point.
Many thanks for any suggestions.
 

zx10guy

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First off, the advertised speeds for any AP is theoretical. In actual practice you're going to only get a fraction of that speed. How much it is reduced depends on a lot of factors to include environmental which means how many interfering factors are present to reduce performance. The other piece as to how those speeds are advertised is how many spatial streams your wireless NIC in your device is capable of. Both receive and send. There is a number you'll see which you'll see as 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 3x2, etc. So for a 3x3 which depending on your device is pretty rare out in the wild for a wireless N only NIC means you have 3 receive and 3 send spatial streams (I think that's the correct order). In your example, this means 150 Mbps per stream and summing all that up arrives at the 450 Mbps number you're bringing up. To get this on 2.4 GHz, you have to adjust your channel width to 80 which means you're taking up channel 1, 6, and 11 to attempt at getting 450 Mbps. The chances of all 3 of those non overlapping channels having pristine air space is little to zilch.

This is why there has been a push to get people to use 5GHz as there are more channel space for non overlapping channels to allow for more channel bonding to achieve the higher throughputs we're talking about with say AC.
 

cwwozniak

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Hi, and welcome to TSG.

To expand zx10guy's pristine air space comment, are you in an area where neighbors within a couple of hundred feet of you may also be using WiFi Access Points? If so there is a possibility that they may be interfering and slowing your connection.

There are at least a couple of free programs, inSSIDer (requires free Metageek account to activate) and Xirrus WiFi Inspector that will run on a Windows PC with WiFi hardware and report on channel usage and signal strengths. The software should show your Access point as the strongest signal. Then disable your Access point and see if someone else is using that channel (or channels). If the computer supports the 5 GHz band, the software will show you how crowded it is. That should help you decide if getting a 5 GHz Access point may help.

https://www.metageek.com/support/downloads/download-inssider-win.html

https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/software/wifi-designer-and-wifi-inspector/
 

Horsley

Thread Starter
Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
2
First off, the advertised speeds for any AP is theoretical. In actual practice you're going to only get a fraction of that speed. How much it is reduced depends on a lot of factors to include environmental which means how many interfering factors are present to reduce performance. The other piece as to how those speeds are advertised is how many spatial streams your wireless NIC in your device is capable of. Both receive and send. There is a number you'll see which you'll see as 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 3x2, etc. So for a 3x3 which depending on your device is pretty rare out in the wild for a wireless N only NIC means you have 3 receive and 3 send spatial streams (I think that's the correct order). In your example, this means 150 Mbps per stream and summing all that up arrives at the 450 Mbps number you're bringing up. To get this on 2.4 GHz, you have to adjust your channel width to 80 which means you're taking up channel 1, 6, and 11 to attempt at getting 450 Mbps. The chances of all 3 of those non overlapping channels having pristine air space is little to zilch.

This is why there has been a push to get people to use 5GHz as there are more channel space for non overlapping channels to allow for more channel bonding to achieve the higher throughputs we're talking about with say AC.
Thanks for your quicky reply. Do you think therefore buying a new dual band access point is the answer or most of the answer to my problem please ? Any thoughts on anything else I need to check / adjust etc
 

zx10guy

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Thanks for your quicky reply. Do you think therefore buying a new dual band access point is the answer or most of the answer to my problem please ? Any thoughts on anything else I need to check / adjust etc
It depends. It could be. There are other variables as to how far away you are from the access point? What type of wireless NIC you have in your device(s)? How many wireless devices do you have on your network at any given time? What type of traffic are you sending over the wireless network? A dual band access point just means there are two radios in the unit. One for 2.4 and one for 5. Which means whatever is going on with the 2.4 or 5 won't affect the other. As I mentioned, the 5 GHz range has much more latitude in terms of the number of non overlapping channels to use to attempt at getting to optimal. If you upgrade to 802.11ac, you will gain further enhancements which will provide the potential for more performance.
 

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