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SO confused with BSOD in new system. I'll give you the power of flight if you help :D

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by neoralis, Nov 1, 2011.

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  1. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Normally with any computer related problem I feel I learn more by fixing it myself even if I almost go off the deep end. This one is different because it's been lasting for months and I have actually gone off the deep end :( a handful of months ago I built my own rig for the first time. I did research and I'm computer savvy enough to feel like I didn't make any obvious mistakes (clearly I did something wrong though) and since all my pieces are new and to my understanding completely compatible I am baffled. My specs are on the bottom and I put it all together piece by piece attaching the motherboard, the CPU, the PSU, and the GPU, as well as the RAM, SSD, and old HDD in a new case. I also installed an old old modem in the PCI slot (which was pointless and stupid in retrospect but I just wanted to put in a shout out to the days of old). I turned on the power for the first time and there seemed to be no problem. I installed windows 7 ultimate and proceeded to install the software associated with the CPU, motherboard, and downloaded the latest drivers for the GPU. To my understanding I assembled correctly a new computer with new components that should be compatible with one another, updated basic software, and I would suspect zero problems.

    It was not long after this that I would get seemingly random BSODs, and occasionally freezes, as well as this bizarre thing where part of the left side of the screen would suddenly be on the right side of my secondary screen as if the whole thing shifted over. I reformatted and reinstalled Windows kept the software simple and it still seemed to be there. I did this multiple times so this leads me to believe it's hardware. It seems at this point to largely revolve around the Internet especially with heavy use such as flash and multiple windows. The problem was exacerbated when I doubled my bandwidth from 6.0 to 12.0. I did remove the modem early on and since then I wiped the system clean so I don't think there should be any drivers left. My best guess is that with the heavy processing needed for the Internet it might throttle the RAM and throw something off. I'm fairly confident the RAM is compatible and I just find it hard to believe that that would be the issue. Obviously though, I don't really know.

    This dump might suggest that various things aren't updated but I'm not sure that's relevant because I've tried that before and the problem just won't seem to go away.

    Here is my crash dump without much third party software:
    Problem signature:
    Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
    OS Version: 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1
    Locale ID: 1033

    Additional information about the problem:
    BCCode: d1
    BCP1: 0000000000000008
    BCP2: 0000000000000002
    BCP3: 0000000000000000
    BCP4: FFFFF8800167CF60
    OS Version: 6_1_7600
    Service Pack: 0_0
    Product: 256_1

    As promised, if you help me solve this problem I will summon angels from above to grant you the gift of flight... Or at least be eternally grateful :D

    Thanks for looking!
     
  2. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Hmmmm... maybe my specs weren't on the bottom :D

    Memory: 12. GB (1333 DDR3 Crucial and I believe it is compatible)
    Processor: AMD Phenom ™ 2 1100T Processor 3.31 GHz
    64-bit operating system Windows 7 ultimate
    Network Adapter: Intel (R) 82583V Gigabit Network Connection
    GPU: AMD Radeon HD 6800 (Black) Series
    Motherboard: Crosshair IV Extreme (Asus) Republic of Gamers
    128 GB SSD Primary drive
    250 GB Secondary HSS
     
  3. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    if this is the computer in your specs, you don't list your power supply, please post the Manufacturer, model wattage and amperage on the +12Vdc rail(s)
     
  4. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Wow! You're fast :D

    I am 95% sure this is it but it's funny that to be positive I have to unscrew it since the info is against the hidden side.

    Thermaltake TR2 RX Cable Management Power supply - 650 Watt

    "Complies with ATX 12V 2.2 Version Compatible with PCI-Express and Dual Core CPU configuration Modularized cable management improves internal airflow PFC function improves energy efficiency Super quiet and stable ball bearing fan Gold-plated connector for better conductivity Built-in industrial-grade protections"


    Since I have a hexa core I'm wondering if this doesn't work. I believe I just needed a min of 600w and since the problem is BSOD rather than power. But I don't have a clue at this point.

    This is also on the RAM but I"m not finding the speed.
    crucial 4gb 240 - pin dimm 512mx72

    Thanks!
     
  5. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    What you have is a very power hungry system. It may be that the power supply is not handling the load well. Except the Dialup Modem all parts were new when you put it together right?
     
  6. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    The only one that was old is the simple maxtor HDD. Could an under powered setup still show up as a BSOD perhaps and revolve around a key issue like the internet?
     
  7. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Your little quote rocks by the way :D
     
  8. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    Thanks, it is actually my life philosophy. Yes Power supply problems are tricky. They can mimick almost any other malfunction that a computer can experience. Older IDE Drives do tend to draw a little more current whe running, but not terribly so. As a personal preference I tend to go a little overboard with my power supplies. If a system would call for a minimum of 600 watts (and remember that is a minimum) I would have a 750 -800W PSU by a high quality manufacturer Such as OCZ, Corsair, Enermax, Seasonic, PC Power and Cooling. Thermaltake is generally a good quality unit, and I used to use them a lot. But have opted for better quality and better warranties.
     
  9. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    Check core voltage, memory voltage, and memory latencies. Make sure latencies set by mobo match the memory (it might not). If the core voltage and memory voltage are at the bottom of the allowed range, turn them up a bit.
     
  10. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Initially I tried to streamline cost but more and more I see the wisdom with overkill power... better safe than sorry. I am now willing to just throw money at this project. If I were to go out and get a quality 750w psu what do you think is the likelihood this nightmare will go away. Obviously I don't need 100% but ballpark like 40%, 50%,60% etc. Also, offhand do you see any other possiblites? I think you nailed it with the power though. It makes sense and I think the web will use the heaviest processing. Thanks man... you rock :D
     
  11. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    @jiml8: would I just look in the mobo's booklet? I'm pretty sure they match up or do I have to find it somehow in the rig? ROG does a great job in allowing you to check voltages but that is largely where my knowledge base ends. Would I turn the voltages up in the BIOS?
     
  12. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    Yes you would set the voltages in BIOS. Turn 'em up a few millivolts at a time, then boot the system. More than likely, it'll be stable after some point of adjusting the voltage.

    A 600 Watt PS should be adequate for your system though you did not list the model, only the manufacturer. Going larger on the PS wouldn't hurt a bit but I wouldn't do it until I was sure it was necessary.

    Your problem is likely associated with the power. So start by turning up the voltages a bit. While doing that, also monitor power supply output voltages when the system is in use. If you see voltages dropping more than 5% from nominal output, replace the power supply since it is either defective or overloaded.
     
  13. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Would turning them up bit by bit be that risky or overload the PSU? from what you said I doubt it but this is the realm of OC where I don't really know anything and I'm always paranoid something will magically explode :D
     
  14. neoralis

    neoralis Thread Starter

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    Also, I'm currently looking at a ton of voltages I can tweak such as CPU and NB Voltage, DRAM voltage, SB voltage, VDDR voltage, etc What should I focus on upping?
     
  15. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    All the voltages are fair game. Normally when I'm getting a system to run stably, I turn up any voltage that is at the minimum level, and then I focus on whatever I am overclocking. If I am not overclocking, I will focus on CPU core and memory core voltages. You seldom need to change the northbridge or southbridge voltage if you don't overclock the bus.

    Also be sure to check that the mobo set the right latencies for the memory. I've seen mobos set this wrong and it will cause intermittent BSOD problems. You usually can turn down the latencies if you turn the memory voltage up, but don't fool with this until the system is already stable.

    As a rule of thumb, if the system tends to hang or crash when the CPU is heavily loaded, turn up the CPU core voltage a few millivolts. If the system gives random BSODs with different software modules identified as the problem, turn up the memory voltage a few millivolts.

    Don't do it much; one step up in the settings if there are settings, and just a few millivolts if you are free to set it. Then run the system. If it crashes again, turn up the relevant voltage a tiny bit more. Keep doing this until the system is stable.

    I'm running a quad-core Phenom-II with 8 Gigs RAM on an Asus mobo, and I'm overclocking everything. I'm not extremely overclocking, but I have the memory turned up about 20%, the CPU turned up about 8%, and the northbridge and southbridge turned up enough to make them synchronous with the overclocks. I spent a bit of time tweaking voltages to levels that make the system stable, but it now runs for months without reboot.
     
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