1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Solved: Basic monitor questions

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by number9, Jul 20, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. number9

    number9 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    40
    I want to finally replace my CRT monitor with an Asus widescreen 19" LCD. This is for basic home/office use--mainly web browsing and word processing. Won't be gaming or watching/editing much video or photos.

    My current monitor is set at 1024 x 768 (4:3), which seems optimal for me, esp for word processing.

    The 19" Asus monitors I'm considering show a recommended resolution of 1440 x 900.

    So I'm wondering: Won't a 1440 x 900 resolution reduce the size of the text in documents? I read someplace that with LCD monitors, using a different (lower) resolution than native resolution degrades the visual quality of the display--is this correct? So if I were to use a lower resolution, would that mean larger text size but worse image quality? If so, then I'm not sure a widescreen 1440x900 monitor is best for my purposes.

    Am I understanding this correctly? Maybe I want a non-widescreen monitor with a lower optimal resolution? Is there a "best" resolution for word processing? Does my video chipset play a role? I have onboard video--Mobo=Gigabyte GA-785GMT-USB3.

    Much thanks for help!--Fyi, these are the three Asus monitors I'm considering--seem like good quality for home/office, under $130, with both D-sub and DVI:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100006519%2050001315%2040000020&IsNodeId=1&bop=And&ActiveSearchResult=True&CompareItemList=20|24-236-068^24-236-068-TS%2C24-236-087^24-236-087-TS%2C24-236-072^24-236-072-TS
     
  2. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    60,900
    First Name:
    Chuck
    You did not tell us the size in inches of your current monitor. There is no way for us to determine if text displayed on the 19 inch monitor will appear smaller or larger than what you are now seeing.
     
  3. number9

    number9 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    40
    Old monitor is 15 inches. My ignorance again--I thought text size [excluding zoom in WP pgm] was a function of the monitor's resolution, not its viewing area. Maybe I'm conceiving or expressing this incorrectly? I'm referring to the inverse relationship between resolution and program window size+contents. Higher resolution, smaller window size+contents; lower resolution, larger window size+contents.
     
  4. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    60,900
    First Name:
    Chuck
    The actual size of the text (in inches or millimeters) as seen by the eye depends on both the physical size of the viewing area and the resolution of the display.

    CRT computer monitor dimensions followed the same dimensioning method used for CRT TV sets. This was the diagonal measurement of the picture tube. Some of this was covered by the bezel of the TV or monitor housing. A typical 15 inch CRT monitor would have about a 13.8 inch diagonal viewing area. With a 4:3 Aspect Ratio, the active viewing area is abut 11.04 inches wide by 8.28 inches high.

    Running at a resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels, your CRT monitor is displaying 92.75 pixels per inch horizontally and vertically. If you're comfortable with looking at text that, for example, appears about 1/8 inch high, that text is being displayed 12 pixels high (for an actual text height of 0.129 inches).

    Now. lets look at the 19 inch wide screen ASUS VW195T-P LCD monitor. LCD monitors are usually marketed by the diagonal size of the viewing area. There may be a bit of rounding off of the actual size but it is very close. The monitor specifications list it has having a 16:10 aspect ratio. This works out to an active pixel area 16.11 inches wide and 10.07 inches high.

    Running at the recommended resolution of 1440 x 900 pixels, that monitor is displaying 89.37 pixels per inch. On that monitor, 12 pixel high text would be 0.134 inches high or about 4 percent larger than the same text on your CRT monitor; which may not be enough to notice.

    In summary, text and other items would appear to be very close to the same physical size on both your CRT monitor and on the ASUS monitor but you would be able to see more of it on the ASUS monitor.

    Running an LCD monitor at a resolution other than its recommend or native resolution is usually not a good idea. The individual pixels would need to be stretched or compressed to fit the native resolution. This could result in fuzzy text.

    You would also need to check the specifications for your motherboard's video controller to see if it supports the resolution and recommended refresh rate of the ASUS or any other monitor you might want to buy.

    Let me know if I cleared things up or made them more confusing to you.
     
  5. number9

    number9 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    40
    "Let me know if I cleared things up or made them more confusing to you."

    Outstanding tutorial, Chuck W--a keeper, exactly what I need. A thousand thanks!
     
  6. cwwozniak

    cwwozniak Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    60,900
    First Name:
    Chuck
    You're welcome. Glad to have helped out.
     
  7. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Similar Threads - Solved Basic monitor
  1. ravihcs94
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    187
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/937116

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice