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Solved: Boots Normally - no internet - service dependencies problems

Discussion in 'Networking' started by boweasel, Feb 17, 2013.

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  1. boweasel

    boweasel Banned Thread Starter

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    Have a 64 bit Windows 7 Home Premium emachines desktop. Although it boots normally, I cannot connect to the internet with a wired connection.

    The erhernet adapter seems fine, but the netwqork services are a mess. The computer service browser won't start because of a dependency service, but when I click on the dependencies tab I get The service cannot be started, either because it is disabled or because it has no enabled devices associated with it. Same thing for the DNS Client and DHCP Client and Network Connections and Netwok Location Awareness and Server and , frankly, who knows what else.

    sfc scannow failed to find any intergrity violations. What? 'Course, I have to run it from the command prompt using a W7 CD and having to type sfc /scannow /offbootdir=e:\ /offwindir=e:\windows, since E: was the Windows directory in the recovery environment. So I'm confused .

    Doesn't Windows 7 have any kind of a Repair Install like good ol' XP did? And if not, anyone know how to get these (obscenity deleted) services to work?
     
  2. Rocs747

    Rocs747

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    I am definitely not an expert but I did have a thought about your problem. Have you checked to make sure all your drivers are up to date? And Win7 does have an internet connection troubleshooter you could try. I hope this will help. Take care.
     
  3. boweasel

    boweasel Banned Thread Starter

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    Oooh, and I was so hoping for an expert ;)
    How does one do that? I have no internet connection with this desktop. The only way I know how to check the drivers in an unconnected machine is to use another PC, go to the emachines website, download all the drivers onto a flash drive, and extract them to the non-connector. Of course that really doesn't check the drivers - it just overlays them. If you know a method to actually check the existing drivers I'd be interested. And please don't think I'm being sarcastic. My computer knowledge is woefully inadequate. And if I do end up overwriting the current drivers, do you think it will allow me to start all the services that I believe are preventing a connection?
    Thanks. Windows 7 internet connection troubleshooter couldn't identify the problem - I think it suggested I call a friend. I kid you not.
     
  4. Rocs747

    Rocs747

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    Ok sorry but that is all I knew to tell you, I have no idea about trying to use a zip drive with info from another computer that is hooked up to the internet. I'm sure there is someone that can help you, if I remember right you can ask for help from one of the experts here on TechGuy. I wish you the best.
     
  5. Rocs747

    Rocs747

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    Sorry I meant a flash drive.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Sorta does. Do an "update" (not "custom") install of Windows 7 over itself and if/when it works all data and installed programs are preserved. It should be obvious that the warning to have data backed up applies.
     
  7. boweasel

    boweasel Banned Thread Starter

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    Well, the Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit CD I have predates the SP1 installation that was done on the tower, so it can't be used for the in-place upgrade. I get a msg that the OS on my PC is newer than what's on the disk, disallowing the upgrade.

    Thanks Microsoft!

    So then I found a site where I could download W7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit. So I did that. It took hours. Then I burned the iso image to a DVD, and tried the upgrade again. This time it worked, but it wanted a product key. It's an in-place upgrade. Why does it want a product key for a machine that was successfully activated years ago?

    Of course it was only then that I discovered a fairly tiny scratch on the sticker on the bottom of the tower. A scratch that rendered 2 of the 25 characters unreadable. I made 2 attempts, both unsuccessful, so now I went from a validated PC that wouldn't connect to the internet, to one that does connect, but is not valid.

    Thanks Microsoft!
     
  8. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    It's really rare that a PC comes with Windows 7 pre-installed and with an installation DVD (instead of just a Recovery Partition or Recovery DVDs). I'm only pointing that out in case you actually had an earlier version of Windows pre-installed, and the scratched key is for that version; if that were the situation your installation DVD would have come with its own Product Key, and that is the one you would need to use.

    Maybe you can (with a phone call) convince Microsoft to provide you with a new key. If you try this be prepared with as much info as you can gather--the partial key you now have, the PC brand and model, the date and place of purchase, etc.
     
  9. boweasel

    boweasel Banned Thread Starter

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    You are correct sir. This actually came with nothing at all in the way of Recovery or Partition or Installation disks. The original CD I used was one I downloaded shortly after I bought the PC and realized that fact. The PC did come with the 64 bit version of Windows Home Premium already installed and already activated. I created the disk so I'd have something if I ever needed to repair that installation. Probably a year or so later I updated the tower to SP1, never dreaming that the disk I spent so much time creating would be useless in the repair scenario I just encountered.
    Gee, I dunno....I hate to anticipate negative outcomes in life, but I've knocked heads so many times with Microsoft over the years that I think they've got me on some kind of list.

    This situation should not even call for a product key. I purchased the computer. It came with a valid product key that was part of the purchase price. The operating system was never removed or reinstalled. I simply performed the upgraded that was suggested her. Which I my mind is no different from the upgrade I did when I downloaded SP1. That upgrade never asked me for a product key. (sigh...).

    If only I had gone into the registry or used Belarc Advisor before the upgrade I'd already have the key.

    At this point I don't know what I'm going to do.
     
  10. boweasel

    boweasel Banned Thread Starter

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    I just did a not authorized 'work-around' ;)
     
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