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Solved: Can't (re-)seat memory - any ideas?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Airidh, Apr 29, 2012.

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  1. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    Can't use TSG Sysinfo as the machine has no memory at all at present, but it is a pretty old Fujitsu Scenic P300 with 2.4G Pentium (reasonable), enough disk space and 128MB memory. It belongs to a friend, and was running so slowly as to be unusable - you could practically cook and eat a meal while IE was loading, not that I would use IE anyway, but that's what she has. I put it down to the gradual bloating of security software over the years (I will post a question about that in the XP forum) and our broadband speed which is about a quarter of a megabit on a good day. For comparison, it's bearable on my machine, which is similar spec and XP also but I have 2G memory.

    So having tried all the usual things to speed up the Fujitsu, I decided to put more memory in - well, it was obvious, but hardware is not my thing, and I try to avoid opening up other people's cases. I have, however, replaced memory in my own box, and was reasonably confident. I downloaded the manuals both for the P300 and for the motherboard, and it looked straightforward.

    There was a 512MB stick left over from my own upgrade, and it seemd to fit the spec, so I tried that first, but couldn't get it to go down into the slot, and I was afraid to damage the m/b; so I gave that up and ran the Crucial diagnostic, ordered up a 1GB stick, and for good measure emailed their support with all the information to make sure I had the right thing - they said I had.

    It arrived and I opened up the case again. The accompanying notes said that the larger module should go in slot 0, so I pulled out the old module, with some difficulty, and tried to put the new one in. It wouldn't go. I pushed as hard as seemed reasonable, but nothing happened. So I removed it, compared it visually to the new one - they were identical - and tried to put the old one back. It wouldn't go in. My hands are not very strong, but I ended up putting practically my whole weight on it. (There was no cracking noise from the mobo.)

    The notes said not to "help" the clips into position, but with no memory in I wiggled the clips a bit, and it was incredibly difficult, but it could be done. So the question is: would it be so dangerous if I just helped them a little, gently, while pushing down on the module? I think they are just too stiff.

    Or has anyone any other ideas?

    Thank you in anticipation .....
     
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  3. managed

    managed Trusted Advisor

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    First make sure the cut-out in the bottom of the 2 ram sticks is in exactly the same place, lay one on top of the other and align both ends.
    If it is then check it's aligned with the key inside the motherboard ram slot before you push it in.
    Sometimes a lot of force is needed, the 2 catches at the sides should snap into place with an audible click when it's fully in.
    If you can't do it with just your hands place something flat across the top of the ram stick and push down on that, be careful to push straight down. I've used an old tobacco tin, a piece of straight wood etc would do too.
     
  4. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    Hi, Managed, thank you for your suggestions.

    Although I didn't actually lay the sticks over each other (will do), could I remind you that the original stick I pulled out wouldn't go back into the same slot I took it from? This also answers your second suggestion.

    I'll try to find something to push with, as you suggest. But these catches are very, very stiff.

    Thanks again. I'll report back.
     
  5. allheart55

    allheart55

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    It sounds to me as if you are trying to fit DDR2 RAM (240 pins) into a machine that takes DDR RAM (184 pins).
    According to the laptop spec's it takes PC2100 DDR SDRAM, not DDR2 RAM.
     

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  6. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    Thanks, allheart55, but this is not a laptop, it is a desktop machine.

    The new (extra) memory was specified by Crucial with their diagnostic scan, and also verified by them by email, just to be sure. But that is actually irrelevant, because having taken out the old memory stick I can't even get it back into the slot it came out of. I think brute force is the only thing that will do it, but I'm not keen on that.

    Thanks anyway.
     
  7. allheart55

    allheart55

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    My bad, (typo) I meant desktop not notebook. You may want to take a look at this link. It
    specifically states that the Fujitsu Scenic P300 runs on PC2100 DDR SDRAM (184 pin).

    http://www.memorystock.com/FujitsuSCENICP300i845GE.html



    Crucial website says Memory Type: DDR PC2700, DDR PC3200, DDR (non-ECC)
    Maximum Memory: 2GB Slots: 2
    Each memory slot can hold DDR PC2700, DDR PC3200 with a maximum of 1GB per slot.

    http://www.crucial.com/uk/upgrade/Fujitsu-memory/Scenic/Scenic+P300+with+Mainboard+D1761-upgrades.html

    I have checked a half dozen different sites and they all show DDR RAM 184 pin. It doesn't seem to
    matter what model or version your mobo is, all models accept only DDR RAM not DDR2.
     
  8. allheart55

    allheart55

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  9. managed

    managed Trusted Advisor

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    Make sure the old stick has it's cut-out over the key-way in the slot, it will start to go in either way round but will only go all the way down if they are aligned.
     
  10. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    @allheart55 - Yes, but you've missed the point - even the memory that has been in the machine for years wouldn't go back into its own slot. I think it's a purely mechanical problem - rusty? :)

    Thanks for the research. I'll check it out.

    @Managed - yes, I did. Honest. Good thought, though.
     
  11. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    @allheart55 - I see what you mean. Crucial and Fujitsu don't agree. So I went back to the machine and the original stick is indeed a PC2100 184-pin, and the new one from Crucial is a PC2700 184-pin. Laying them one on top of the other as Managed suggests, they match exactly.

    It is now 2.20 am. Sorry, but I have to go to bed. I'll take it up with both Crucial and Fujitsu in the morning.

    Still doesn't explain why the original PC2100 won't go back into its own slot :(

    Goodnight both!
     
  12. managed

    managed Trusted Advisor

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    The new stick is a little faster than the old but it's the right type and should work although it may run at the lower sticks speed which is perfectly normal.

    Both sticks should fit the socket, push the 2 side catches outwards before trying again.

    EDIT : Good night !
     
  13. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    Airidh:

    A computer that comes with 184-pin DDR PC2100 modules will usually accept 184-pin DDR PC2700 or DDR PC3200 modules.

    They will just run at the slower DDR PC2100 speed.

    ------------------------------------------------------------
     
  14. Airidh

    Airidh Thread Starter

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    Manager and flavallee, yes, I was beginning to suspect that myself, and you have confirmed it. I didn't think Crucial was really likely to be wrong. I have bought memory from them in the past.

    I note what you say about speed, and I wonder: would it be just as well to forget about the 128 stick, especially as it won't go back in, and just concentrate on fitting the 1G one? After all, it is to go in slot 0 anyway. I have, of course, already tried the new stick in that slot, but maybe I didn't try hard enough. I will have another go, paying particular attention to the catches.

    It comes to me that I have not yet tried your suggestion, Manager, about pushing it down with a hard flat object. I still think it's a matter of brute force. If I can only get the new module fitted, I could then evaluate it, and there is still the possibility of getting another 1G if necessary.

    I'm sure I have a tobacco tin somewhere.... No, I don't smoke; it is full of pen nibs :).
     
  15. MedicMorphine

    MedicMorphine

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    When removing memory sticks from a motherboard. Discharge static from yourself by holding onto something that is earthed such as a radiator, or if the computer is still connected to a power outlet but switched off (uk only) then the matal case. Remove the case and locate the two (usually white) plastic catches at each end of the ram. push these outwards and the ram should arise as if by magic out of the slot. Remove ram, it should involve little or no effort to remove them. Check that the replacement ram has the cut-out on the circuit board end lines up exactly with the old one. Offer up the new ram, (there are two guide slots in the catch mechanism) the ram has to be inserted absolutley vertical to the motherboard. once the ram has been inserted into the guide slots it needs to be firmly and slowly pushed against the resistance. You will be able to see the catches moving into the closed position as the ram is inserted. CLICK and the ram is in. Job Done! On first boot the computer BIOS may recognise the increase in ram capacity and give a warning message, but it should auto re-configure. If you can't get the original ram back in. Your doing it wrong.
     
  16. allheart55

    allheart55

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    My sincerest apologies Airidh. I could have sworn your initial post stated you were replacing/adding DDR2 RAM to the Fujitsu machine.
    My concern was the huge difference between DDR2 240 pin and DDR 184 pin RAM. I've apparently misread the issue, my fault, not yours.
     
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