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Solved: Code

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by RootbeaR, Feb 17, 2007.

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  1. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    I have been thinking about trying out Linux.
    Browsing this forum, I see you need code to install programs and use properly.
    Where can I learn all this code?
    I asked this on another thread and was told to google it.
    So what do I google?
    Code?
    Computer code?
    Computer language code?
    Unix Code?
    Linux Code?
    C++?
    In my browsing of Linux, I have only come across one page so far that gave commands and description, but it was limited.
     
  2. Gibbs

    Gibbs

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    You don't code to install things. You can use commands to though. It depends on your distribution (linux OS) though.

    In Ubuntu installing a program can be as easy as going to Applications > Add/Remove. Typing in the application or what your looking for (i.e. Web Browser), tick it and click apply. It does everything for you, no need to download and execute. It downloads and installs everything for you. (Screenshot attached).

    Alternatively you can use commands in the shell terminal like:
    Code:
    sudo aptitude update
    sudo aptitude install mozilla-thunderbird
    It's very easy to remember things after a small amount of time. It depends on what you want to do. For example if I want to run a file I could use:
    Code:
    ./filename.ext
    Or to extract a bin file:
    Code:
    ./binfile.bin
    To update all your software something like:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get upgrade
    Password:
    Reading package lists... Done
    Building dependency tree       
    Reading state information... Done
    The following packages will be upgraded:
      beryl beryl-core beryl-manager beryl-plugins beryl-plugins-data
      beryl-settings beryl-settings-bindings emerald emerald-themes imagemagick
      libberyldecoration0 libberylsettings0 libemeraldengine0 libmagick9
    14 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
    Need to get 7354kB of archives.
    After unpacking 824kB of additional disk space will be used.
    Do you want to continue [Y/n]? 
    
    All I put in was "sudo apt-get upgrade" and the root password. Everything else is found and done and all you have to do it type in Y to continue.

    Some can be more difficult to install or run but the readme or google usually explains it all.

    The shell terminal is awesome. Theres lots of cool things like nano and pico that are text-editors inside the terminal. If you've ever used DOS it's similar to that.

    You pick it up very easily. It's not rocket science :). It can be good fun playing around and learning things too.

    But to answer your question don't worry. You won't be programming or writing lines of code to install a notepad. If things were that difficult very few people would even bother.

    I've been using Windows for roughly 10 years and Linux for around 10 days. It's well worth it.

    The best thing to do is pick a distribution, install it, setup an internet connection, sign up on the distros forums and go from there. There is lots of help and support for most Linux OS's.

    Heres a good resource for shell commands: http://linux.about.com/od/commands/l/blcmds.htm
     

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  3. vtel57

    vtel57

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    As I've stated elsewhere around here, for a Linux beginner, I recommend the Ubuntu distribution of Linux. As Gibbs explains above, it's very simple to install and use right "out of the box". However, there are some things you'll need to learn. Linux is NOT Windows.

    Here's a link to another forum where I'm a regular. This link has many useful links to anything and everything Ubuntu:

    http://forums.scotsnewsletter.com/index.php?showtopic=17087&hl=ubuntu+links

    Enjoy! :)
     
  4. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    Thank-you people.

    I am still a beginner with windows so I have a lot to read before I try Linux.

    I don't have a second computer for sure to try it on first, so I will have to do a dual boot, which I need to learn first as well.

    I do work at a College though, so I think the first chance I get, I will check the Library/IT for some reading material.

    Thanks for the links though. I have already been reading from them, but I will need a book with an index for when I try this as I don't want to make the book myself. Bookmarks are getting big, don't want to print everything then try to find what I am looking for, too much for me to have to refer to.

    Thanks again and enjoy the rest of your week-end.
    XPSP2
     
  5. vtel57

    vtel57

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    I would recommend a "Linux notebook". I keep a log of all my Linux experiences. It's definitely come in handy to have that at my fingertips when there's something that I can't remember off the top of my head. My notebook is handwritten. If you choose to keep your notebook on your computer, be sure to have multiple backups on external media. It would be a shame to lose it. I once had a huge "tips and tweaks" Windows diary on my system. The hard drive failed. I was very, very fortunate to have backups.

    Luck!

    ~Eric
     
  6. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    Yes that is good advice that I will be heeding but is also what I meant about an index. I guess I will just have to create and maintain an index.

    So, like a kid at Christmas, I couldn't wait. I am using the PCLinuxOS TR2 LiveCD now.

    I like it!

    So, what about SimplyMepis?
    I have it downloaded as well(LiveDVD). It also has 3 CD's of extras. I understand they are all the programs one may need to fully migrate to Linux.

    With windows, I can do pretty much whatever I like, one way or another.(I will always have to have windows and MS Office because of work)

    From what I have been reading, Linux is more specialized to do one type of thing.

    So, for me, it has come down to PCLinuxOS, SimplyMepis, and Ubuntu that was already suggested.
    Can anyone offer any more insight regarding these three systems?

    The only reason I am even considering a different system other than windows is security. I like XP and must be lucky as it is very stable for me. In the eighteen months I have had it, I have never had a BSOD. I have already had a bad experience with the sony rootkit though.

    Can a liveCD ISO be burnt to a DVD and work? I don't see why not, but I know nothing.
     
  7. Gibbs

    Gibbs

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    On the topic of security. With Windows you can avoid errors and infections etc. The only problem is there are so many flaws with OS's like Windows XP that sometimes you can't help it. With Windows it's ad ware this, anti-virus that, spy ware removal this it's pathetic. Not only does it cost money but it effects the reasons the majority of people use computers for.

    Now with Linux it's completely different. Don't get me wrong every operating system has flaws, exploits, holes and virus's but with Linux theres less. Why? Because you are in control. If something wants to install you have to give it permission etc. It's very simple.

    Linux is about many things. I love the fact that most things are open source. How does this help? Well lets have an example. Say that theres an error in launching the terminal. You or the many other millions of Linux users can fix it. You don't have to wait for Microsoft to (because they won't release their source).

    Linux doesn't do "one thing". Guess what? TSG (these forums) most likely run on Linux. So does the majority of other websites/servers. I can't think of anything Linux can't do that Windows can apart from some native Windows DirectX games...

    Now onto needing MS Office. First of all OpenOffice can open MS Office files, so theres no problem there. Also if you have a Windows installation disc you can actually run Windows inside of Linux with software like VMWare and Parellel (see attachment below). Not only does it allow Windows to run inside of your Linux distro but you don't have to create a partition. Backups consist of copying and pasting one file for the entire system. It's really nice.

    If it sounds like I'm ranting at you I'm not by the way :p
     

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  8. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    I have to have MS Office because I help students with it. I usually need to do the course myself to ensure the book is giving proper instruction, such as creating the database and make sure it works. If not, I need to modify the instructions to get it working properly and pass this on to students. It is also my preference between it, Open Office and MS Works.

    A couple of other questions.

    Can I use speech recognition with Linux and what is the program needed if I can?
    (I saw an Icon on your desktop that looks like it may be for that)

    What Linux OS are you using? (If you don't mind my asking)

    Also, just went to yahoo to try to play cribbage. What is needed in order for yahoo to enable and open an applet?
     
  9. vtel57

    vtel57

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    PCLinuxOS is a fine distribution. It's a child of RedHat and the old Mandrake Linux. It has very good roots.

    Simply Mepis is based on Debian GNU/Linux, also a fine distribution.

    Ubuntu direct child of Debian. I find it to be a fine distribution. It's my primary OS, as a matter of fact.

    A new one that I just found recently and am playing around with is Foresight Desktop Linux, based on rPath Linux, a direct descendant of RedHat. It's not bad. I'm having some minor bugaboos with Nvidia drivers, but I'm sure I'll get that resolved.

    For simplicity of use, Ubuntu is still the winner, though, in my opinion.

    Have FUN with it! :)
     
  10. vtel57

    vtel57

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    On my system...

    Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS Dapper Drake (Primary OS)

    Debian Etch (testing version of Debian)

    Fedora Core 6

    OpenSuSE 10.1 (free version of SuSE)

    Slackware 11.0

    Foresight Desktop Linux 1.0

    I also have WinXP/SP2 on my system, but I haven't booted to it in months. ;)
     
  11. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    Yes. This is why I want to try Linux and once I am comfortable with it, get it for a friend of mine as well. He has just started to use computers and I can tell he finds it frustrating. Not only does he have to change the oil, but he needs to do a complete engine overhaul everytime he starts the thing up. Various scans etc... He spends more time doing maintenance than he does anything else.
    I don't want him getting discouraged from computers mostly for his sons' sake. His son just turned 8 today, yesterday now. I also think it will be good for his son to learn Linux at home and MS at school.
     
  12. Gibbs

    Gibbs

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    If you look at my attachment Windows can be run inside of Linux. It can also be done in full screen with whatever resolution :).

    The Linux OS being used in the screenshot is Ubuntu Edgy.

    Java is a cross-platform language. Providing you have the run-time environment (which you can get for Linux, Windows, Mac and Solaris) you can run applications, applets and servlets identically.
     
  13. RootbeaR

    RootbeaR Thread Starter

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    I have only been using for a few hours and a LiveCD to boot, no pun intended, but I feel Firefox is much more stable. FF 2.0 has been giving me grief with windows. Random crashes etc...
    I may try all three systems mentioned. Partitions are already in place after moving only a few files onto another partition. Just need to format them as they are NTFS. I have three 20 Gb partitions I can use for OSs' and a 40 Gb partition for video editing which I may split in half so I can still use for same purpose but with windows on one half and Linux on the other. Just in case of difficulties learning new Linux programs to do what I want.

    Thank-you for your replies and input.
     
  14. vtel57

    vtel57

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    I hated FF in Windows. I quit using it completely. However, when I came to Linux, I found that FF is truly in its element within Linux. It's my primary browser on all my Linux operating systems, with Opera as a backup browser.
     
  15. Gibbs

    Gibbs

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    Firefox is horrible on Linux, it's one of the slowest browsers around.
     
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