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Solved: Connectivity Loss

Discussion in 'Networking' started by rainforest123, Dec 27, 2006.

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  1. rainforest123

    rainforest123 Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    This may turn out to be a malware problem. For that I have a plan. I posted the problem in the network forum to gather your thoughts & advice as to how to approach the issue from a networking standpoint.

    About a month ago, the LAN began losing connectivity. The office closes at 1530 & re-opens at 0630. The computers are left on all of the time. The loss occurs between 1530 & 0630.

    Network consists of 14 PCs, in 2 locations. "A" & "B" are separated by about 500 meters, connected by a fiber optic line.

    Also, the local server connects to a server, remote by a distance of hundreds of miles. This is supposed to occur at night.

    The site has 2 locations; 4 PCs & a server at "A"; 10 PCs at "B". The server runs Win 2000 Pro SP4. The PCs are a mix of Win 2000 Pro SP4 & Win XP Pro SP2. All PCs & the server run Symantec AV Corporate. All 14 users are supposed to store their data on the server at "A".

    Internet is currently DSL , at 128 kbps. A T1 line will be installed within the next 30 days.

    The computers arrive from the remote, corporate office, configured for the local LAN, with Symantec AV Corp, static IP addresses, et al. The local office has no IT person on staff.

    "A" is staffed by users who state they do not engage in dangerous internet activities. "B" is staffed by users who, among other things, play "Party Poker" at lunch time. They have been playing PP for > 1 year.

    The users in "A" & "B" get onto the network by unplugging the power of the SpeedStream 5871 modem, Cisco PIX firewall & HP router & turning off all of the computers. Then they re-connect the devices & turn on the PCs.

    None of the PCs have antispyware. The Win 2000 PCs have no firewalls.

    About a month ago, our weather turned cooler. The "B" users state their connectivity is slower, during the day, when the temps are cooler.

    I doubt that the cold weather is related to the cause of the problem, but the users seem convinced so I thought I would mention it.

    About a month ago, the owner brought in a laptop & a Blackberry [ could be another PDA; I haven't see it nor have I spoken with the owner. The person who used the term Blackberry may have used it generically, like "calling all tissue paper Kleenix. ]

    Finally, about a month ago, the "home office" was purchased by a larger company. The local users state they lost access to their email at the same time they began to lose their connectivity.

    Tonight, we are going to turn off all of the PCs in "B". The users in "A" will check their connectivity when they return to work. It will be cold tonight. My theory is that if 1 of the PCs in "B" are causing the problem, tomorrow morning, the PCs in "A" will be able to get onto the network.

    The ISP has documented 44 calls, from the staff & other IT people. The ISP believes the problem is not on their end. The ISP stated they monitored the LAN activity on 2 occasions, 1 time for 24 hours. On that occasion, they noted a spike of activity between 0910 and 0919. They noted no spikes between 1530 & 0630.


    Sincerely,
    RF123
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
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    Terry
    You're far ahead of me on this whole issue, but I'll throw out a couple ideas in case you can build on any of them.

    "... get onto the network by unplugging the power of the SpeedStream 5871 modem, Cisco PIX firewall & HP router & turning off all of the computers ... "

    No way to tell from this where the disconnect occurs--ISP/modem? modem/router? router/computers? Maybe you already know, but it would certainly help to know if the computers can still communicate with (ping) the router in the morning; or if the router still has an internet connection; etc. Has anybody tried to reconnect by trying just one of the quoted fixes?

    Phone lines and coax cables can give slower service and/or disconnects in colder (or hotter) weather because of an insecure connection or a faulty component. W/o any knowledge I'm guessing that fiber optic connections can also be imperfect. So it is not impossible that the cold is an issue.
     
  3. O111111O

    O111111O

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2005
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    Are you using anything to monitor, well, uh. Anything? i.e. What'supGold?

    I'm curious what your ISP says your DSL is trained at. It sounds like you're experiencing symptoms of lousy signal-to-noise and your DSL modem is retraining periodically. [Which in turn may make you need to reboot the PIX to force it to acquire a new dynamic address]
     
  4. rainforest123

    rainforest123 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    Messages:
    8,256
    TN:
    Thanks for your comments.

    "No way to tell from this where the disconnect occurs--ISP/modem? modem/router? router/computers? Maybe you already know, but it would certainly help to know if the computers can still communicate with (ping) the router in the morning; or if the router still has an internet connection; etc. Has anybody tried to reconnect by trying just one of the quoted fixes?"

    No, I don't know. I wish I had that knowledge. I tried to ping the SpeedStream & router, using the default IP addresses, but the pings timed out. I think someone has changed their IP addresses.

    00:
    Yours are also appreciated.
    Today was my first visit to the site. Their ?regular? IT consultant was not available, so they called me. They asked me to return tomorrow [ Thurs ]. I will read about Whatsup.

    I may try netdiag.

    "ISP says your DSL is trained at". What do you mean by "training"?

    I was going to run a line quality test from DSL reports.com , but ran out of time.


    I forgot to mention that the "test" LED on the SpeedStream is mostly solid green; with a rare flicker. 1 of the employees stated that "someone" said that meant the SS was defective. I read a little about the 5871 & "test" LED status. Again, I need to educate myself.

    Thanks again for your advice. Additional advice & comments will be appreciated.

    Sincerely,
    RF123
     
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