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Solved: Data Backup versus Music backup

Discussion in 'Multimedia' started by Morny, Feb 17, 2007.

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  1. Morny

    Morny Thread Starter

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    Not sure how to explain what I mean but can anyone please tell me if there is any difference between backing up files as 'data' files or making a music CD as a means for backing up? I normally backup my music files, using Nero, as 'data' files. Once burnt, I can also use this same DVD/CD on my PC and play the music files in the normal way, so what is the difference between choosing 'data' as opposed to just backing up the files as music files, please? Does it perhaps take up less room when choosing the 'data' method?

    I should be grateful for any replies.
    Many thanks
    Morny
     
  2. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

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    If the files are MP3, WMA etc they are just "data".

    If you chose to create a "music" CD, they get converted to .cda files in the process which will play on most ordinary stereos, but will take up about 10 times the space.

    You would need to tell us the format before we could advise precisely
     
  3. Morny

    Morny Thread Starter

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    Hi Kiwiguy, Sorry I haven't got back to you sooner but the site was busy and I then had to go out. Yes, they are MP3 files. When I back up my music files as 'data' and reinsert the CD/DVD I noticed that I am still able to play the music as I normally would do direct from my computer and I cannot directly hear any difference in quality. I know I cannot play MP3s on the Hi-Fi, although I can on our DVD recorder. Thank you very much for your reply because at least I know now it takes up so much more room making just a music CD.

    I wonder if I may ask one more question, please? The only other thing that often puzzles me is this licence backup from Windows Media Player. A few years ago I paid for and downloaded a CD from Napster. This CD, along with tons of other music is backed up to an external drive and also burnt (for safe-keeping). In the meantime I bought another computer and I found none of the tracks of this CD would play. A message from WMP said about the licence needed. Luckily I had made a music CD of the tracks so I could play them and mix and match them to my desire. I had saved the licence details but somehow putting it back on my new computer didn't work. I have since learned about 'telling' the player about 'restoring' the files BUT what I wondered was why I need these licences? I mean, when I buy a CD in a normal shop, I can rip the tracks to convert to MP3 and all is well. Probably not strictly legal,although it is only for my own pleasure. I am able to play the music whenever I want without being asked for any licence. I wonder if you could enlighten me, please?
    With kindest regards
    Morny
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Downloaded music requires a license, you're a happy user of DRM (Digital Rights Management). :D The reason most store bought CD's don't require it is you're buying the physical media. However, even new CD's are starting to incorporate copy protection. Surely, you remember the Sony debacle where they installed a rootkit to attempt to protect their CD's, right? ;)
     
  5. Morny

    Morny Thread Starter

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    Hi JohnWill, Yes I certainly do remember that business with Sony and believe they (or someone) is trying to curb this. It's just that I don't want the hassle of having to remember to keep these licences on my external drive as well as all the music. I want to be able just to play them as and when I want. The only option I thought of is making a music CD of each track so that I can always revert to these if some tracks decide not to play. Bit of a pain, but I see no other option.
    Thank you for your reply
    Kindest Regards
    Maureen
     
  6. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    The "approved" method of fixing this issue is to burn them to a CD as audio files, then rip them with any of the many popular ripping utilities to the format of your choice. AFAIK, that's still legal, and you end up with the music without DRM restrictions. Obviously, sharing these files after you do that is illegal.
     
  7. Morny

    Morny Thread Starter

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    Ok, thank you all very much for your help.
    Morny
     
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