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Solved: Data Recover - Question

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by Speakersrock, Mar 25, 2008.

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  1. Speakersrock

    Speakersrock Thread Starter

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    Hi all,
    I have been wondering about something for a while, could someone maybe clarify?

    Do you just use the same programs for recovering over-writed worked in like word for example, as you would for say, a reformatted hard drive?

    Okay, here's and examaple.
    Like in My Docs. If you have a file called 'accounts', and a file called 'reports'

    eg1.
    You work on 'reports', and delete a bit of what the documents contains, and then save it. Then you realise that what you deleted is actually something you need.

    eg.2
    You work on 'accounts', and accidently overwrite 'accounts'

    How would you co about restoring this? would it e the same software again? but just with a decreased chance of succsess?


    Hope that makes sense,
    Many Thanks.
     
  2. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    I think you are confusing software with hardware. All programs, software right? Well if you open a file called reports and alter it in any way and save it that's it as far as software goes. ON the hardware side it depends, did the save save over the top of the actual file that you opened or did it save in a new place on the hard drive? If the former then there is just a fragment of unassigned data that used to be part of the file sitting there provided it took up a little less space when saving back. If the latter case, the entire old file is just sitting there on the hard drive without any assignment, the space it occupies ready to be used again when the time comes. That'e why everyone will say if you accidently delete a file and you need to get it back, stop using that drive immeadiately because almost any other process might write something over it and it will be lost.

    Does that clarify or mystify further?
     
  3. rodeognome

    rodeognome

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    This is an excellent question - I've often wondered myself - some software company outhere must of designed a piece of software for a data recovery job like this?
     
  4. Speakersrock

    Speakersrock Thread Starter

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    thanks rode! :)..
    I have done a fair bit of Data recovery recently, but just couldnt decide what you would do in the case of that sanario!!

    nooks, yeah, that does clarify well (sory for long resoponse on my part btw.)
    Can I just confirm though, for your former situation, are you saying that the little bit left is most proberbly non-recoverable? Or do you think a prgram may still be able to pull it back from hideing?
     
  5. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    The little bit would be there but it wouldn't have any type of file identification header on it that could be recognized by a recovery program so it would just be data (ones and zeros) which would most likely be exceedingly difficult to identify in and amongst all the other scraps of unattached and partially overwritten data, but not impossible.
     
  6. Speakersrock

    Speakersrock Thread Starter

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    Okay, Thanks a lot.
    So, you say about overwriting it in the same place on the drive or not, when you click save to something on work, to overwrite one, it does actually over-write it? and not just save a new one and change the assignments? - Just to clarify!

    Thanks a lot for your continued help.
     
  7. Gulo Luseus

    Gulo Luseus

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    Long and short wise, to all intents are purposes, if yo usave a file over a previous version, its gone. Dead. Killed. Finished. The one yo uhave is the one you stick with. You may be lucky and be able to undo things to go back to the point you wanted, but it would have to be saved again.
    I tend to copy the file I am working on, then paste it to a remporary location- desktop is usually a favourite- so if the worst comes to the worst, you have always got the original. :)
     
  8. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    Yeah, that's a hardware level question, does a file that grows or shrinks before its saved again and it doesn't fit in a sector (or all if it now fits in one less sector or someting like that) and there isn't a contiguous sector for the overflow does just the part that fits get written back in the same sector and the extra fragmented to a new sector somewhere else or does the whole file get written back to contiguous sectors somwhere else? How do the various file systems handle that? I don't know and don't care too much because I never want to have to go digging around to find out anyway when a good backup prevents all that possible consternation.
     
  9. Speakersrock

    Speakersrock Thread Starter

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    lolo!, Ok, gave me lot to think about there, thanks.

    Thanks for all the help everyone :)..I think that has well answered my question now :)
     
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