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Solved: Help with 4G hotspot Internet serving to wired network W second Internet mode

Discussion in 'Networking' started by HalloweenWeed, Oct 24, 2012.

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  1. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    Hello, I am new to this forum. I need some help configuring a network for a future hotspot plan. Pardon my verbose, as my exact situation needs a lot of description and some explanation.

    I plan to get a Samsung SCH-LC11 via USCellular for Internet service, for both my daily on-site use of my computer, and at home for gaming, etc. Presently we have Wildblue (ViaSat) satellite Internet, connected to a D-Link DGL-4100 Gigabit Ethernet LAN modem. Unfortunately, satellite Internet has a lot of "lag" (ping time near 1000ms) so it can not be used for (multiplayer) gaming, and there is always a second or more delay when we click on stuff in web browsers. Some particular web sites take an excruciating amount of time to load a page, especially https, and all those sites that require access to multiple sites in order to load; and it is getting worse as the pages get more complicated. Whats more, when I upload things to my company website (that I administrate myself), it is also excruciatingly slow, as our upload speed is much less than download. We have a plan that allows for 17GB/mo. download and we currently are at 15 used. Big files download pretty fast, getting almost 200KB/sec; but uploads are <20KB/sec.

    The US Cellular hotspot offers 2, 5, and 10GB/mo. download limits, and 5 is the max. affordable for me (overages are nearly the same price/GB anyway). It uses the Samsung SCH-LC11 unit. I have 2 network printers, a Tivo, 2 continuously wired computers, one Asus Zenbook W/wi-fi that I hook up to the Ethernet when home, a NAS for company data backup (NOT a Windows Home Server), and one 7" tablet that currently uses a D-Link DIR-600 router (802.11g/n, 802.3(u)) hooked up to the LAN Ethernet too. And of course the satellite Internet modem. All these run through the D-Link DGL-4100 (and a couple of multi-port dumb switches).


    The question is, can I hook up the Samsung SCH-LC11 behind an Ethernet firewall router (my D-Link DGL-4100) along W/the Satellite modem, so both will supply the Internet connection (one at a time)? I have no problem with turning one or the other off so that only one will supply Internet. The thing is, I am not sure how to set up a wi-fi receiver behind the D-Link DGL-4100 firewall to supply the entire LAN. The D-Link DIR-600 router is set up to serve as an Internet connection for wilreless, not to receive one (via wireless) to serve the LAN. I am not adverse to setting up one computer as an Internet server for it, perhaps adding a network card for a second Ethernet port, but I just don't know if that's the best plan. The topology would change when I didn't have the Samsung hotspot, meaning at that point the system would have to get the Internet from the satellite modem. If I set up one of my computers to do that, then said couputer would have to have the Internet connections manually changed in order to get the Internet from the modem? PITA. What's more, I would have to leave said computer on 24/7 to get the US Cellular hotspot.

    Eventually I want to cancel the satellite Internet altogether. I have 11 mos. left on my contract, and it will cost the same if I cancel right now, and what's more I am unsure if the US Cellular hotspot reception will be good enough in my exact location (I am out in the boondocks, but the coverage map shows my spot to be "very good", with "good" just a couple hundred yards away). We have problems W/trees and the wet leaves and snow in the wintertime, as evident by the TV signal reception problems (we cannot get cable), so I need to test the reception - for many months - before relying on the US Cellular hotspot permanently. I use this for my business, so reliability is crucial.


    Here is a link to the US Cellular device page:
    http://www.uscellular.com/mobile-hotspots/index.html
     
  2. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    The routing seems too complicated to me. Plus I don't think the cell phone is a reliable solution for all of your devices.

    I understand about your situation though. My wife and I were looking into a gorgeous home to rent but it was not in a cable provided area. Wild Blue was the option but I couldn't say it would be viable and the 'data usage' is laughable.

    As to the ping time, I'm not sure if you saw their website but it does say it's not good for gaming -- something I would need myself.

    You say it's for your business... then Wild Blue should be fine, unless your business requires a lot of data over the internet.
     
  3. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    It's not a cell phone. It is a wireless hot spot. It does not use a cell phone either. The Samsung SCH-LC11 is almost exclusively for Internet service (although that would include Skype). Well I suppose some ppl just don't understand, since this is new tech.

    And yes, I knew that bfr I got Wildblue. As you said, it is for business. But now maybe I can get this 4G hotspot for gaming, and get lower latency too as a perk for my Internet browsing.

    Here is a link to the US Cellular device page:
    http://www.uscellular.com/mobile-hotspots/index.html


    If it were easy, I wouldn't need to ask; I am net+ & A+ certified and as you can guess by my equipment list I am quite capable of setting up and administrating a network. I would try a local service Co, but my experiences with that have been that I know as much as they do, speaking of SOHO networks and computers, the big difference being they have exp W/enterprise-class networks (and many brands and types of routers) and I don't. Not only that, if I had to pay for that service to get this, I can't afford it anyway.

    FYI my forte is computer hardware, you can find me on the Asus ROG Rampage series motherboards forum. I just don't have enough networking exp to help other ppl on this forum, I usually can't figure out what they are talking about (I have to read the manuals).
     
  4. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    That was my error :eek: i deal with (majority of) sub-average end-users and my mind was not focused on the device.

    You can set up computers to have alternate IP addresses so if the original IP setting (must be on DHCP) does not pick up an IP address from DHCP, then it will use the hardcoded IP.... for example:

    Your mobile hotspot is using 192.168.1.x for IP address and your router for WB is on 192.168.10.x. You would set the NIC to DHCP and then connect to your mobile hotspot. Whenever you don't have the connection to the hotspot (out of range/been turned off etc) then it will use the alternate IP which would be static and pointing to your router for WB.

    Failing that, and if its all wireless, simply ensure your computers have the SSID/security key in the preferred network list entered in and just turn off from power the device you don't want to use. I don't know if normal end-user routers would be able to route automatically to without having some heavy duty router. That's beyond my level (hardware wise)

    Incidentally, have you looked into Clear mobile hotspot? They supposedly offer unlimited connection (had a brief look) and supports up to 8 devices where yours does 5. Here is their coverage area

    EDIT: perhaps if you have maybe a wireless access point pulling from the mobile hotspot which is connected to a hub/switch which the other connection (WB) is connected to and with both set to DHCP, simply connect the cable you want to use... if that helps? Just thinking out of the box here.
     
  5. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    Um, I'm not sure I understand your answer, Couriant. Are you saying to use wireless on my computers, for LAN? Presently they are wired, and do not have wireless. How is the hotspot going to get the info to the LAN? And if I did what I think you said, how would that serve Tivo Internet?

    And like I said, we live in the boondocks. No Clear mobile available here. There is limited brands serving our area.
     
  6. AtlasG

    AtlasG Banned

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    If you're currently using 15 GB of bandwidth, then the hotspot won't meed that need. That's what I would be most concerned about.

    I don't know of a way to connect both the hotspot and your satellite modem as simultaneous providers that you ca switch between on demand. You'd have to disconnect one, and re-connect the other.

    There should be no problem using the 4G hotspot for your network. I'm not sure I understand what your questions are about things like getting it "behind" the LAN or "on" the LAN. You just plug it in, and connect your devices to it.
     
  7. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    The Samsung SCH-LC11 doesn't appear to have an Ethernet connection hence why I was mentioning the wireless repeater or something to that effect, unless the model on Samsung's website is not the same one as you are planning to get.
     
  8. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    Overages are only $10/GB more charge, they don't shut me down. I can do that on demand, when I cancel Wildblue. I have that covered. My usage lately is atypical.

    As I said in my OP, I have no problem W/turning the other one off. What I would have a problem with is reworking my computer Internet connections every time I do so.

    Well here is where my experience is slim.
    A. Presently we have a firewall in the D-Link DGL-4100 between any of my LAN devices and the Internet. This is why it has an "Internet" RJ-45 port. I would prefer to keep a firewall such as this between the Internet and my LAN. Is this not correct, or flawed?

    B. The Samsung SCH-LC11 is designed to "serve" the Internet to wireless devices. So is my D-Link DIR-600, aren't they one-way in that respect? i.e. my D-Link DIR-600 will not "get" the Internet connection from the Samsung SCH-LC11? I have no other permanent wireless on my network. So the Q is, how does the Internet get from the Samsung SCH-LC11 into my LAN?
     
  9. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    I am running a NAS on my LAN, and I don't want it to be exposed to the Internet. This is the #1 reason I need the LAN firewall. Security.
     
  10. AtlasG

    AtlasG Banned

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    The D-Link seems to be a wireless router. What is it connected to for Internet access?

    The Samsung device is both a modem and a wireless router. Using it means you don't need anything else. You don't need another modem or another router.

    This means you have two completely separate Internet providers. They have nothing to do with each other.

    If you don't want to change any settings on your devices, you should configure both the D-Link router and the Samsung hotspot to have the same SSID and wireless encryption key. Then you can only have one or the other connected at a time. You can't have them both turned on.

    I don't understand your firewall settings. Do you have other hardware between the satellite modem and the D-Link router that you want to use with the Samsung hotspot?
     
  11. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    If you mean the DIR-600, and I think you do, it is connected to my LAN. Nothing is plugged into it's "Internet" port. It gets the internet from my LAN. My LAN gets the Internet from the DGL-4100, the Wildblue modem is plugged into it's "Internet" port.


    Yes I know this. Do you mean I would not need the other firewall, i.e. the Samsung is a firewall?


    Um, it is becoming obvious to me you either don't understand that the Samsung has no Ethernet ports, or you don't understand that without the DIR-600 I don't have anything to constantly receive the wireless signals ("Internet") from the Samsung device - unless I buy another wireless device. Then I would want to know what device I would need to buy.


    Which D-link router? I have two. The Wireless DIR-600, or the wired DGL-4100. If you mean the 4100, answer is no other devices. If you mean the 600, yeah, the 4100 is between them. The 4100 assigns all my Ethernet DHCP (I also need to use use static MAC assigned IP addresses).
     
  12. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    Oh, let me try clarifying it this way:
    The Samsung SCH-LC11 "mobile hotspot" will only serve up to four devices. So something needs to do network address translation to get my 5 internet devices to work with it. This is done with a router, or a dedicated Windows ICS (Internet Connection Sharing) on an always-on computer (not an option for me). A router needs to be in-between my wi-fi Internet receiver and my LAN. I cannot connect all my 8 devices via wi-fi, and I wouldn't want to either. So the Q is, how do I do that? Will the DIR-600 do that - in backwards configuration - with nothing connected to the "Internet" port? Or do I need to connect my LAN to it's "Internet" port, and turn off the 600's integral firewall to get this to happen? Do I plug the DIR-600 into the DGL-4100 "Internet" port to get the NAT to work? Because essentially, my DIR-600 is becoming the Internet modem of the wired portion of my LAN in these cases.
     
  13. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    The problem we have is the connectivity of your wired CPEs. Once we can figure that part out, we should have a better time here.

    Having said that, I don't think the D-Link DIR600 has the ability to catch other signals. You will need some kind of a repeater/ wifi catcher that has an Ethernet port to connect a switch or router if you are looking at more than 4 CPEs.

    Worse case scenario, you could use Internet Connection Sharing on a computer with wireless connection and make the LAN a gateway to other devices, but I wouldn't recommend that. You would need to use static and it would be a mess.
     
  14. HalloweenWeed

    HalloweenWeed Thread Starter

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    What about using one of these for the Wi-fi client Internet catcher:

    EnGenius N-EAP350 KIT Indoor Wireless-N Access Point with Gigabit PoE Injector

    EnGenius EAP9550 Wireless Access Point/Repeater 802.11 b/g/n

    These two units are designed W/802.3af PoE, for use W/security cams. I'm thinking it would give me an Internet source to my "Internet" port on my DGL-4100 router, and that router would do the NAT as long as I set them up W/different private network addresses. Of course, I would need to direct connect Ethernet to the EnGenius Ethernet port in order to configure the network addresses before connecting it to the DGL-4100.

    Or this cheaper unit:
    Netis WF-2403 Pocket-sized Wireless-N Mini AP / Repeater / Client

    It should work the same way, this one says can be used as a "client" and has a 4-port Ethernet switch.


    No matter which, in the end I would have the network map like this:
    The Samsung SCH-LC11 "mobile hotspot" receives the Internet and serves it to up to 4 wi-fi connections, one of which would be my client receiver unit. The output of that would go to my D-Link DGL-4100 router "Internet" port, this router would do NAT to act like a single connection to the wi-fi "client" unit. And the DGL-4100 would serve all my wired network on the LAN side. Theoretically, this would mean I could then have 3 additional wi-fi devices on the Samsung SCH-LC11 "mobile hotspot."

    Is this correct? Any ideas/opinions? The latter unit is cheap enough to try even if there is a good chance of failure.
     
  15. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor

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    I didn't realize there were such a common item... I may need one for my new home :)

    I think the second link would be the better choice, but if you are willing to use the 3rd option, then by all means go for it. For the second link, you may need a separate Ethernet switch (a small cheapo one) to connect the devices, or 2 routers, but I think you are now on the right track! :)
     
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