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Solved: Home Domain Set-Up

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Tech3, Apr 1, 2010.

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  1. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    I wish to set up a Windows Server Domain at home. I previously had a basic home LAN, but have recently bought a server and wish to expand the functionality of my network.

    I wish to run the domain, dns and dhcp from the server according to the following diagram. The diagram is based on the hardware available to me and how I think it would need to be set up.

    My questions are:


    • What IP address should I set on the Modem router?
    • For the server NIC 1 and NIC 2, what should their IPs be and what IP address scope(s) should I set on the server DHCP?
    • What IP address should I set for the Wireless AP?
    • Any other information to achieve the desired configuration or things I would have to do differently?
    The Server is running Server 2008 Enterprise R2, the NAS is a linux box, Laptop-L is running XP Professional and Laptop-M is running Win 7 Professional.

    Please let me know if you need any other information and feel fry to add detail to the diagram and re-upload.

    Thanks,

    Matthew.
     

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  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Why are you not plugging the server up to the wireless router acting as a AP only?
     
  3. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    I originally tried that and ended up not being able to connect to the domain - a client could see it but not connect because it was pointing to the dns from the router not the server, I believe. I tweaked some more and ended up in a right configuration mess. If it is possible to do it this way with the server running the domain, dns and dhcp, please let me know how you would configure it.
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    So you need to have your clients use your DC as their DNS server. Your DC would then point to your ISP's DNS server. This will allow your clients to still get name resolution with internet resources while still being able to work in your domain. Having your DC act as a router is unnecessary and has its own set of issues which is how you have it set up in your diagram.
     
  5. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    The main reason I wanted DHCP on the server is because we have DHCP on the server at my school and it would be good to implement it at home to a degree so I can experiment and learn. Although I can learn from my setup at school (I am a casual ICT Technician), I can learn a bit about it to a degree, but I can't afford to mess it up which could affect up to 800 PCs. At home, I can learn without worrying so much about messing it up and have more flexibility as to when I can learn.

    If it can't be done feasibly at home and such as setup would only be feasible at a school, I suppose that is learning something in itself, but if it's possible to run the DHCP on the server at home without too much hassle, I would like to have a go at that.

    If it's not possible, would the following setup diagram be reasonable and if so, could you propose how I would set up the IP addresses/other basic configurations to make it work.

    Thanks,

    Matthew.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Your updated diagram is better. There's nothing wrong with running the DHCP server on your DC. But you have to turn off the DHCP server on your modem/router. You can't have both running on the same layer 2 network. There's nothing precluding you from doing this setup at home. In fact, it's really a simple domain/network setup.
     
  7. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    Setting up my original LAN IP addresses was simple because it was a straight-forward logical setup. However, this setup is a bit more complicated and I don't know what IP addresses/ranges to set on the devices. If you know what the IP setup would be for either the setup with 'server as DHCP, router DHCP off' or the 'router as DHCP, server not a DHCP' setup, please could you let me know.

    Thanks,
     
  8. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Well what's your current IP addressing scheme?
     
  9. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    For my current, basic LAN setup, the router has internal IP 192.168.0.1. All of the following are reserved by the router's DHCP:

    Laptop-L: 192.168.0.2
    Laptop-M: 192.168.0.3
    NAS: 192.168.0.4
    Printer: 192.168.0.5

    This is totally flexible.

    For the 'router DHCP' option, I can probably just have splitter going to one router which is a wireless modem DHCP AP which goes out to the devices, but if possible I would like to do the 'server as DHCP option'.
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    So keep your wiring scheme as you have in your second diagram.

    Now, set up your DC as your DHCP server and turn off the DHCP server on your modem/router.

    Set the DHCP settings on your DC as follows:

    DHCP scope range: 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.254
    DHCP scope subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
    DHCP gateway: 192.168.0.1
    DHCP DNS: [IP address of your DC]

    That should be everything you need. But I would make the NAS a static IP as it's customary practice to have static IPs assigned to servers/devices providing services. If you want to use static IPs, you can either make IP reservations in your DHCP scope settings or just shrink the range of available addresses. Say from .2 to .100 or something of that manner.
     
  11. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    So my router should be 192.168.0.1 and what static IP should I assign to the DC, something outside the range 192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.254, for example 192.168.1.1?
     
  12. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    No, if you're using a subnet mask of /24 or 255.255.255.0. If you set your DC at 192.168.1.1, then it's on a different network. Your computers will not be able to get to it unless you put a router in there which can route to that address. If you set your DHCP range to be 192.168.0.2 to .100 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, then you can assign your DC an address of 192.168.0.101 or any number from 101 up to 254.
     
  13. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

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    You should keep this simple and just keep everything on the same physical network as zx10guy has suggested. I would have the wireless AP coming off the main router and acting just as a wireless access point and dumb switch. Turn off the DHCP on both routers and get the servers DHCP up and running with a DHCP pool of addresses. I personally like reserving the lower ip address for all my devices and the DHCP for the higher but too each his own.
     
  14. Tech3

    Tech3 Guest Thread Starter

    I managed to get it up and running.

    Thanks for all your help,

    Matthew.
     
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