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Solved: how to free up space on c drive....??

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by nesh96, Mar 30, 2011.

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  1. nesh96

    nesh96 Thread Starter

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    okay.. before i start let me inform u that there are numerous threads on this and i have gone through all of em and tried quite a lot of solutions... nothing seemed to help much......
    i am running windows xp and i am gonna install windows 7... the windows 7 upgrade advisor says i need 16 gb of free space to install windows 7 (32bit), whereas i have only managed to clean up 11.5 gb of space. my total space (in c drive where xp is installed) is 29.2 gb... i deleted the temp files, downloaded many softwares to clean up etc as mentioned in the forums. but nothing seemed to help much. i checked the c drive and the major space occupying folders are :-
    1) documents and settings-( 5 gb after moving contents of my documents to an external hard disk)
    2) program files - ( 2.8gb after uninstalling all unwanted softwares..
    3) Windows - (4.7 gb)
    4) and there are lots of TEC files named "pc_eng.str_0A99CC00_0000927F.tec" and so on which i dont know what to do with!

    So any help would be greatly appreciated.........
     
  2. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    You'll need far more than 16. Within the first day of using it, it will use 20 even if you don't install anything. The next day, 30. You should have at least 50 GB's to be at all ready for 7, and should have 100.
     
  3. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    If you've already saved all your personal data to an external hard drive, why don't you do a hard drive format and clean install of Windows 7 instead of upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7 and leaving a bunch of Windows XP "debris" behind?

    --------------------------------------------------------------
     
  4. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    The "upgrade" will result in a semi clean install with the current installation moved to a Windows.old folder.
     
  5. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    You didn't provide a description of that computer nor a description of its devices.

    Have you confirmed that Windows 7 drivers are available for ALL of its devices?

    One of the biggest mistakes that people make is upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7 and then discovering that Windows 7 drivers don't exist for some or all of the computer's devices.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------
     
  6. rdu8791

    rdu8791

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    I agree with all of the above, especially Elvandil - Windows 7 will eat up all the room it can find.

    While it seems that the best solution for you seems to be to get a new machine, one slightly cheaper solution is to get another big hard disk, and I mean big - then clone your existing stuff onto your new hard disk, and use your old disk as a slave (D:)

    Just another idea.
     
  7. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    Sounds crazy that an OS needs 16 Gigs of room just for the install (compared to what XP needs) but its reality and as mentioned, unless you are on top of it constantly slicing and dicing and restricting processes that would otherwise pretty much double the size in a relatively short time, no matter what you do on a disk that size, it is going to be a short term solution.
    Clone to a bigger disk and give the system partition at least 50 gigs if you don't install much, 100 if you do, and 150 if you are a gamer and install many games.
     
  8. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    I've got Windows 7 installed in my 8-year old Gateway 500S(E-4000) desktop with a 38.2 GB hard drive.
    Between the operating system and my installed programs, they consume almost half of the hard drive.
    Even if you did the same with your 29.2 GB hard drive, you would only have a few GB's of free space to spare.
    You really need a larger capacity hard drive.

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  9. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    My Win7 installation is at 183 GB's now. I have many programs (obviously), but not too many really huge ones (except the Britannica and Rosetta Stone, which are very large). I could install to a second drive, but no reason, really. Acronis images are automatic and I don't notice when they are made, so the size is not an issue.

    But as recently as maybe last year, I would never have thought I would use that much. Just glad I gave it 250 GB's. :D
     
  10. nesh96

    nesh96 Thread Starter

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    guyz i agree with all the above comments, but that is not a solution to what i really wanted .... i need the c drive only for the windows 7 installation and i always install major programmes such as games, dictionary, etc on my other drives as i am doing now... my total hard disk space is 320 gb including all the drives.... but i dont want to install windows 7 in any other drive but c... so i am running xp now and if i delete all the xp files in c drive wouldn't the system crash?? or should i format only when i install win 7?
     
  11. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    Yes, while XP qualifies for for a Windows 7 upgrade, there is no upgrade path from XP to Win 7, so you might just as well format the drive at the time of install, as long as any resident data is safely backed up.
     
  12. sonexpc

    sonexpc

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    Yes you better format c driver and do a fresh installation ... it is not a good idea to put the program file in other driver letter ... The OS and Program better in the same drive.. because all the program need to register in the Window directory .... if your c is gone ... your program in other driver is also useless... ( Many will do OS and Program in different in window 98 because the program can run independent) but not in window 7 or XP ... and even you install Window 7 on C now the program in your other driver still won't run.... you can re-partitation your HD and install window 7 in C.
     
  13. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Just to be clear, there is no "drive C:". Partitions do not have drive letters. That was a long time ago on a different type of partition. They are assigned when Windows boots and stored in the registry. So you can have several logical drives named C: on the same physical drive. If you had XP, Vista, and 7 all installed to the same hard drive, each of them could be on C: when booted up. So if the drive letter is your reason for choosing a particular drive, it is not a reason.

    You can install 7 on any (internal) partition in your system and still have it on "drive C:" when it is booted up.
     
  14. nesh96

    nesh96 Thread Starter

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    thnx elvandil ... i didnt know that!! :)
     
  15. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    OK. Now that you do, keep in mind that setup will assign drive letters, too. So if it sees other partitions first, your Windows may get installed on H: or something.

    So, to be sure that setup sees only one partition and calls it C: for your installation, you need to remove other drives, or you can temporarily hide the partitions on the same drive until setup is done.

    This makes it slightly more difficult to set up dual boot since setup will not do it automatically, but it can still be done.

    So when you boot the new Windows, it will be on C:. But when you boot a different Windows installation, it may see itself as on C:, too, and call the partition with the other Windows D: or something else. You can even change the drive letter in a different Windows installation and when the first one is booted up, it will still see itself as being on C: since you only changed it in the other registry.

    Get it?

    If so, you see why you should never use letters to decide what drive to format from a booted tool or something since it may call drives by different names and you end up with all your stuff gone. Use size, contents, or location to identify drives to be on the safe side.
     
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