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Solved: Internet2, Abilene, bandwidth bottlenecks?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by tjamnz, Jan 30, 2007.

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  1. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    I pulled this data from a Qwest website:

    Abilene, the farthest reaching and most advanced research and education network in the US, today announced that the first transcontinental path in its nationwide upgrade to the next generation of networking is in service. When completed later this year, the upgrade will quadruple the capacity of more than 13,000 miles of network to 10 gigabits per second, more than 15,000 times faster than a typical home broadband connection

    I think its great that we can transfer data this fast, however, how long do you think it will be before devices can write data even close to these speeds? Im wondering what type of consumer level hardware will ever be able to support bus transfers of this magnitude? In regards to modern day pc's. (The Best Buy, and Circuit City variety).

    Im just looking for some ideas, as to how this could benefit the avg comsumer today, and if anyone has any input on this very interesting subject.
     
  2. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    In regards to bandwidth, Ive discovered that the telcos will someday surpass cable modem bandwidth capabilities with fttc in particular, and in the process offer real competition for content that viewers really want to subscribe to. For instance like being able to subscribe to "error free" streaming of your favorite tv channel for lets say 5 bucks a month ect... (Im sure the cable companies are concerned about this). Other than that, Im still hoping to discuss this topic with a few members who have an interest in Abilene, or those who might have some info in regards to maximizing download speeds when bandwidth wont really be an isuue. (hopefully in the near future.).
     
  3. O111111O

    O111111O

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    I2's "revolutionary" bandwidth is finally catching up to commercial carriers.....

    You're right about broadband. FTTC/GPON is delivering 75mbps in some urban areas.

    WRT 10GIG to the desktop, I think that's quite a bit off. Even running 30gig Infiniband channels (PCI-X extensions for SAN/LAN connectivity in servers) have a hard time keeping the pipe filled.
     
  4. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I find that my 15mbit FiOS service is seldom the bottleneck when I go to a site for a large download. Until the infrastructure gets a lot faster, I don't see much point in 75mbit connections to the home.
     
  5. O111111O

    O111111O

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  6. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    Hey... there IS an acutal loonix distro on the interweeb :D
     
  7. O111111O

    O111111O

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    Yes, Alex shares my sense of humor.
     
  8. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Reread post #4. :rolleyes: Remember that a chain is only as strong as the weakest link. Nowadays, that's turning out to be other than the last hop to the subscriber.
     
  9. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    That's what my instr "Bill Ferguson" always sais at vtc.com. (in referral to a few netwk courses im takin there (weakest link comment)) Anyways.. it looks like Cisco and Qwest are going to be the big winners in the future with vBNS ready hardware. Maybe, now would be a good time to invest in a few of those companies that manufacture high quality silica glass, and companies that make the cable too. Will the whole world be fiber ready in 10 years?

    I'm imagining an infrastructure where one could download at 10 to 14 terabytes per second. The transfer rate would be the equivalent of downloading approximately 3000 DVD quality movies in a single second, or for instance I read The print collections of the U.S. Library of Congress are only (only? lol) 10 Terabyes.

    But unfortunately sysboard bus speeds dont even come close, and the ability/storage capacity to cache the data, let alone write at those speeds, right?:confused: . For instance, I think the fastest hdd's can write around 40,000 KB. Whew.
     
  10. O111111O

    O111111O

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    I'm working on a project to roll Unicast VOD and "broadcast" Multicast HDTV channels over IP into hotels/MTU's. All via GPON.

    1 Unicast HDTV feed @ 1080p before lossy compression is 230mbps. In practice with MPEG-4 this can be signifigantly reduced. However, there's alot of color loss and even macroblocking in most cases.

    For the hotel, a pair of G652 fiber is dropped into hotel from CO. The CO is connected into a longhaul network that in turn connects to an IRT satellite farm. As a pilot 2 10GIG Lamda total - 1 demuxs 8 1-GIG HDTV DVI's, that carries about a total of 20 HDTV channels, 1 carries VOD unicast traffic.

    Hotel room selects VOD channel, 20TB [Netapp] NAS appliance downloads/caches video and begins unicast stream to IP address of DHCT in the hotel room. Normal 480p/720p stuff takes seconds to transfer, full 1080p resolution videos take about 3-5 minutes to transfer to hotel.

    Hotel chain in question expects to have this all paid for in under 2 years. It's a huge draw and a differentiator. Assuming all of the DRM bugs are worked out.

    Now, pull all of that infrastructure back into a pop/CO. In the areas that FIOS or GPON are being rolled out, for subscribers that are willing to pay 150-200 per month for their Internet/TV service, there's enough ROI to warrant doing this. It's only a matter of time.
     
  11. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    That totally rocks!
    [​IMG]
     
  12. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I think the sticking point is getting people to pay $200/mo for Internet access! I sure hope that's not the way prices are going. :rolleyes:
     
  13. tjamnz

    tjamnz Thread Starter

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    Maybe we can get uncle sam to subsidize fiber backbones, or give telcos the tax breaks to do it, that way... all of the costs wouldnt have to be passed on to consumers, and the net nuetrality issue can finally be water under the bridge.

    Also...With that kind of speed someone at home could host a popular site with lots of traffic utilizing ddns


    (y)
     
  14. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    I'm not saying that I wouldn't like a really fast connection, but I'm a realist. :)
     
  15. O111111O

    O111111O

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    I agree, $200 per month is pretty tough to swallow....... Don't hold your breath on tax breaks, I have a feeling consumers will take the brunt of that. Much like the first ADSL users.
     
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