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Solved: Is it possible with Comcast?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Jason08, Oct 13, 2008.

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  1. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    Hi,
    I'm trying would be to have 2 lines out of my modem (with Comcast High Speed Internet.) One would be Ethernet to the router, and one USB to the PC. People on the game and my modem manufacturer told me to have 2 lines out of the modem I would have to buy an additional IP address from my ISP. They said it would not work to have both connections with DHCP.
    But I was shocked and very disappointed to hear that Comcast does not support 2 lines out of the modem.
    For something (dealing with ports) I can't get to work with the router, I feel very confident it would work with this way; it works with a direct connection to the modem, but I want the router to still have Internet at the same time. So I was told from Comcast that while it may be possible to do this with my modem, it's impossible with Comcast.
    But I'm wondering, if I have the Ethernet line from modem>router as DHCP, and the USB line from the modem>PC as a static IP, does anyone know if that would work?
    Thanks, Jason
     
  2. avisitor

    avisitor

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    If Comcast won't sell you the extra IP, then nope, it won't work.

    However, why can't you put the PC behind your router? If you absolutely must, you can DMZ the PC.
     
  3. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    Hopefully this won't be too confusing, but I'll explain in detail about the router being dynamic and the PC being static:
    The router would still be dynamic as it is now, but when I make a direct connection to the modem (no router then) for what I'm doing, I get a DHCP address. After making the additional connection (USB to PC) out of the modem, do you think it could work to set that DHCP direct connection IP as a static IP? I feel pretty sure what I'm trying to do would work, but what I'm not sure about is if both the router and the PC could still have Internet that way.
    Believe it or not, for what I'm trying to do, I have tried putting the PC in DMZ and it does not work :(
     
  4. avisitor

    avisitor

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    You can't set it with a static IP unless you buy one from Comcast...

    What is it you're trying to do that you're having so much trouble with.
     
  5. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    Hmm, so even if I get the default gateway and DNS servers correct (with the settings from the direct connection IP), the most important things for setting static IPs, you're saying I wouldn't have Internet??
    Because there really wouldn't be any difference between the static numbers I would set and the DHCP IP, the real difference is that one can change, and one will not, so wouldn't that work, so set the numbers properly?
    It is a game server for Need For Speed Hot Pursuit 2 that I am trying to do, and can't do it with port forwarding and DMZ from behind my router. I don't want to get into too much detail particularly about the server and what I've done on the router because I have a thread for it in the games subforum.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Usually, as Avisitor has been saying, ISPs provide only one (dynamic) IP for residential service. Business service often includes multiple IP addresses, which can be static if desired. When the Comcast rep said "no" he/she may have been thinking of residential only. Ask them if you can get a business service with multiple static IPs.
     
  7. avisitor

    avisitor

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    FWIW, Comcast Business Class service gives your 5 Static IPs and the total service with those IPs is $99/mo.
     
  8. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    That does make sense, that they do only provide 1 for residential, but is it then that because they only provide 1 that if I set static with the correct numbers, it wouldn't work, because they don't have things setup for it to be possible to have 2, even though things may be set correctly?
     
  9. avisitor

    avisitor

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    Well, the problem is when that IP gets assigned to someone else because you no longer renew the DHCP lease, Comcast thinks it's no longer used. They assign it to someone else. Now, there's an IP conflict. Plus, it's probably in violation of the TOS if not something with ARIN.
     
  10. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    Ok, so if I understand correctly, then, if after having 2 lines out of the modem if the router's (the machine with DHCP) IP gets released, you're saying becasue of the static IP from the USB line with that address that's already the "1" IP that they provide you with for residental, so they wouldn't renew the router's IP? If so, then, wouldn't it work to click the "DHCP Renew" button on my router?
     
  11. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    You shouldn't need to pay for a business-class account and a static IP just to play one game that, I'm sure, millions of people are playing without requiring that type of setup.

    You cannot assign a public static IP address. It simply must come from your Internet Service Provider. You're fighting a losing battle with this one. It just isn't going to happen.
     
  12. avisitor

    avisitor

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    You can't have two computers/devices with the same IP. It's a resource conflict. So, if you converted either box (with or without the other) to a static IP, you'll loose the IP and hence connectivity in three days or you'll loose connectivity immediately when both have the same IP.

    EDIT: DoubleHelix beat me ;).
     
  13. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    I don't really understand that I couldn't assign a public IP static. I mean, if I get the default gateway and DNS numbers correct, the only difference would be one can change and the other can't.
     
  14. avisitor

    avisitor

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    Legal Reason: It's most likely against your ISP's TOS to do it. If it's not, they're crazy, because it's against their agreement with ARIN/their ISP. The ARIN has that responsibility to the US government. It's most likely illegal because it violates that agreement somewhere along the line.

    Technical Reason 1: If you have two devices with the same IP, it's not going to work. That is, your router and separate computer cannot have the same IP.

    Technical Reason 2: If you configure one of them with a static IP (and disconnect the other), you will loose connectivity in about three days since there is nothing to renew the DHCP lease. Comcast will then assign that IP to something else, which creates... an IP conflict. If you have both devices connected with the same IP, you have... an IP conflict. Whenever you have an IP conflict, stuff just doesn't work.
     
  15. Jason08

    Jason08 Thread Starter

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    No, they wouldn't have the same IP. Or at least they eventually could, but the odds of it happening are smaller than it happening in an LAN. The USB line to the PC would be static, and the Ethernet line to the router would be DHCP. So the router could get the PC's static IP, but it isn't a very likely possibility of it happening like in an LAN. And if it were to happen, in that situation, wouldn't it work to just renew the DHCP IP (router.)? The PC IP shouldn't change in that situation, because the numbers would be set static.
     
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