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Solved: Need Cable Wall Connectors in rooms of house???

Discussion in 'Networking' started by doug1234, Nov 28, 2008.

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  1. doug1234

    doug1234 Thread Starter

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    Hello
    I don't have cable wall hookups in my rooms, and would like to install wall plugs but am not sure what kind or where to buy cable.
    Would solid cable as used by Road Runner be best?
    Should I have a main connection panel in garage and then feed indivudal cable to each room?

    Thanks

    Doug
     
  2. leroys1000

    leroys1000 Banned

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    You should be able to get the cable TV cable,wall plates,boxes and connectors.
    At home depot.
    Ask for assistance there and they should be able to help you.
    A splitter or amplifier would probably best be placed in the garage
    to keep it accessable and out of site.
    The cables will probably need to be run overhead,inside the ceiling
    then dropped down through the walls.
    Means drilling holes in the top plate of the wall.
     
  3. doug1234

    doug1234 Thread Starter

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    Thanks Leroy
    I know a guy who ran cat 5 through out his house, but then read where solid cable was best, so thought I would ask.
    I am putting recessed lights in several room, so have the space open above the ceiling and thought this would be a good time to run cable and install wall plates
     
  4. Frank4d

    Frank4d Retired Trusted Advisor

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    Is this for computer network hookups in every room, or TV, or both?
     
  5. leroys1000

    leroys1000 Banned

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    Depends on what you are doing.
    The standard cable TV cable is best for cable TV and internet.
    It has a center conductor and a braided conductor that shields
    from interference.
    Looks just like the stuff the cable company uses.
    Sounds like the guy running the CAT5 was setting up easy
    access to a home computer network.
    Different type cable for a different application.
     
  6. doug1234

    doug1234 Thread Starter

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    The cable will be for TV and computer
    I haven't checked Home Depot yet, but did see Capital Lighting has RG 6U which I think is the right cable for $43 / 1000'
     
  7. leroys1000

    leroys1000 Banned

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  8. Frank4d

    Frank4d Retired Trusted Advisor

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    RG-6U is excellent for TV in every room, but not to network computers.

    I would install a passive splitter where the TV cable comes into the house, and connect a TV cable distribution amplifier to it, along with your cable modem (more about the modem later).

    Connect the various TV connectors to the distribution amplifier outputs. You can also connect for example two TVs through a passive splitter to each distribution amplifier output (to minimize the number of distribution amplifier outputs needed; but keep in mind the signal quality deteriorates rapidly if splitters are connected to other splitters in a daisy chain configuration.

    For the computers you want to get a (wireless or wired) router and/or ethernet switch, and connect that to the modem output using Cat5 or Cat6 cable. Then connect the computer connectors for each room to the router or ethernet switch ports.

    You could only wire RG-6 to each room and omit the modem and router all together. But you would have to install a cable modem in each room that has a computer. You would likely have to pay your ISP for separate accounts for each (which gets expensive), so I would avoid that route. Networking them together also becomes very complicated.
     
  9. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    You need to have a "homerun" from each connection box to a central location where your network switch/router will be located. You can't daisy-chain Ethernet like you do telephone wiring. Solid conductor cable is correct for in-wall wiring and has superior transmission characteristics to stranded cable.

    I'd run one of the RG-6 lines and a CAT6 to each location, cover all the bases. :)
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    I would actually pull at a minimum 2 RG6 and 2 Cat5e/Cat6 drops per room.
     
  11. doug1234

    doug1234 Thread Starter

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    Thanks
    I have Road Runner now
    TV and their modum plus my wireless router.
    Existing cable is run to the garage and up through the floor, but it is attached outside under the eve and around the house to get to the TV
    I'm hoping for a cleaner look than cable poking through the walls as it is now.
     
  12. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Well, that may be a bit of overkill, but what the hell. :D
     
  13. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    The reason why I recommend a minimum of 2 RG6 and 2 Cat5e/6 is because you want to have some flexibility. If you're going through the trouble of pulling those cables, it doesn't take much more to double up the runs. What precludes many people from attempting to pull the initial drops is because how much of a pain in the rear it is. So you want to at least not have to do it twice when you realize you needed more drops.

    Now why would one want more drops? Well, in the case of my dedicated sound room, I had pulled 2 RG6 and 2 Cat5e/6 in there. When I recently had DirecTV come out to install a new HD DVR, you couldn't ask for a simpler installation. The 2 RG6s came in handy for the dual tuner setup of the DVR. One of the Cat5e drops is used to network the DVR. The other is for the obligatory phone connection for the DVR.

    So having two RG6 drops will allow better flexibility with your video needs where you can accommodate dual tuner devices or have two different sources (one satellite...one cable.) For the dual Cat drops, you can dedicate one for data and the other for analog voice. Or you can use the second drop for whole house automation or A/V distribution.

    I learned this lesson along the way with wiring up my house. All my 2nd floor rooms are wired with one LAN drop. But I wished I had pulled more. The various rooms on the main level reflect what I've learned as I have multiple drops at each location. My family room has the 2 RG6/2 Cat5e combo. My office/study has 2 Cat 5e drop on the wall for my office printer for network printing and fax functions, a single RG6 on another corner for video for my TV, and 3 Cat 5e drops on the floor under my desk with 2 for LAN and one for voice.

    A conduit should also be considered where possible to allow for easier future expansion.
     
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