Solved: Okay is this good for the hardware.

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zergpc208

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Okay is this good for the hardware.Now and than the lights go dim in my room .Some one was saying it is a voltage change or some thing .And can do damage to the computer and TV is this true.:eek:
 
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zergpc208 said:
Okay is this good for the hardware.Now and than the lights go dim in my room .Some one was saying it is a voltage change or some thing .And can do damage to the computer and TV is this true.:eek:
Patrick Norton from the now defunct screensavers (computer call in help show) called that "dirty power" and no it is not good at all. you need at least a powerstrip. but that is like peeing on a fire and wont protect yopu from power surges. you need a good back up battery to help protect you from bad bower. this lets the 50-200$ backup battery take the power surge hits and leaves the pc safe.

if it were hit just right power surges can kill most electrical items.
 
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Wow, I remember when that episode aired. Can't you get simple surge protecters that your PC plugs into?
 

zergpc208

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A power surge is too much power it can damage electronics.A voltage drop is lack of electricity or voltage and thus make the computer turn off or re-start..

That's what people tell me :eek: Any thing electronic needs the right corrent and voltage too little it will not work too much it will overheat ..

number of volts is a measure of the strength of an electrical source and the fuse in the basement trips if the voltage is too high..

I think you can get some thing that trips if the computer voltage is higher than 10 volts.

Any thing higher than 10 volts the computer will overheat.
 

JohnWill

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You need a UPS if you have that kind of unreliable power. It will protect you against power surges, power sags, and even momentary interruptions.
 

JohnWill

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zergpc208 said:
I think you can get some thing that trips if the computer voltage is higher than 10 volts.

Any thing higher than 10 volts the computer will overheat.
In truth, the switching power supply in your machine is considerably more flexible than that. For instance, I have a Vantec P/S sitting here, and it's specification is 88VAC through 264VAC, it'll supply it's rated power over that entire range. It's quite common for even a 110/220 switchable P/S to run from 95 - 135VAC on the 110VAC setting.
 

zergpc208

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You need a UPS if you have that kind of unreliable power. It will protect you against power surges, power sags, and even momentary interruptions.

I thought that a voltage drop is fine or blackout.But a power surges is not..:confused:
 
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As an indication, using an incandescent light bulb on a 230v supply, you will "see" a dip of 4 volts or more with the eye.

Same with a voltage rise, it's about 4 volts before its visible.

You will seldom see a voltage "surge" as they generally last a few milliseconds.

Surge diverters are fine for low level "disturbances" that may give small power fluctuations but a serious fault (e.g. car hits pole) can cause major strife. In my installation here, the fault current possible is 26,000 amperes.

Thats 8,000++ horsepower if you want to visualise it, now imagine that small plastic surge diverter absorbing that amount of grunt even for a few milliseconds....

I run a pair of UPS's here that disconnect from the supply and run on batteries, isolated from the supply. They will disconnect in a few milliseconds of sensing a disturbance but would still be a blackened lump in the worst case of a direct hit from high voltage or lightening. But as JW above states, they offer superior protection in most cases.
 

JohnWill

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zergpc208 said:
I thought that a voltage drop is fine or blackout.But a power surges is not..:confused:
I recently had a problem where my 110VAC went to over 150VAC, there was apparently some problem outside the house, never did get a straight answer from the power company. I lost a couple of small electrical devices, and a few light bulbs. All of the UPS systems started beeping madly and disconnected from the power as they should. So yes, a power surge is covered, at least by APC, Belkin, and Tripplite UPS units. :)
 

zergpc208

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I recently had a problem where my 110VAC went to over 150VAC, there was apparently some problem outside the house, never did get a straight answer from the power company. I lost a couple of small electrical devices, and a few light bulbs. All of the UPS systems started beeping madly and disconnected from the power as they should. So yes, a power surge is covered, at least by APC, Belkin, and Tripplite UPS units
It had to be problem on the street and not your house.So big surges on the street will go to your house.

A voltage drop is fine or blackout.You coomputer should re-start or shut off my it self if this happens.
 
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Personally, I have a line filter/surge surpressor placed on the junction box for the entire house. It's enough for any serious lightning strike. It's basically a box with the lines side by side with a ground, that's filled with sand or other semi-conductive material to allow a surge to ground. These are quite cheap, normally around $25, but you need an electrician to install them.

For the PCs, I suggest using a "Quality" power supply. By this, I mean one made by Antec, Super-flower, TTGI, Fortran, cool-max, etc. Not one by POWMAX, MGE, ore the generic that shipped with the case. This will normally make much more difference in the life of your components than what power-strip you use.

For power-strips, even though most offer a circuit breaker, they're not equal.
Make sure it supports EMI filtering. That way a faulty appliance is not back-feeding line interference into your household circuit. Make sure that a circuit breaker and or fuse is included and is working correctly. I really recommend using a power-strip with EMI filtering for any plug-in appliance, not just your PC's. I also recommend buying EMI filters for any high voltage appliances, such as washers/driers, refrigerators, microwaves, florescent lighting, etc. They can be found at home automation stores, since line interference plays hell on remote controls. Read the specs on any strip you buy, and price shop. Most power-strips offering EMI filtering cost more the $30, but I bought several a few weeks ago from officemax for less than $5 each. Some cheap strips DO offer EMI filtering with adaquate breakers, while some $30+ models sold for home theater equipment aren't as capable.

For a UPS,
Make sure it's rated a high enough wattage to protect every piece of equipment you plan to use it for. On today's PC's, a off the shelf 350W UPS is rarely enough, and not really a good deal at any price. In fact, buy one with the highest wattage rating you can afford, because it's common that you plan for it only to be used for this and that, but when you get it you end up finding other things to plug into it. Also, you need to compare the wattage rating with the amount of standby time. If you compare two 650W units, at first look they might seem identical, until you notice that one gives five minutes of standby while the other gives fifteen minutes.
 

JohnWill

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zergpc208 said:
It had to be problem on the street and not your house.So big surges on the street will go to your house.

A voltage drop is fine or blackout.You coomputer should re-start or shut off my it self if this happens.
Well, it could have been in the house, or the wiring from the street, but there was no evidence of that. I had the power company come out, and they did a pretty complete inspection of things, and we never did figure out what happened. It has also never reoccured... A voltage drop or blackout isn't fine with me, I want my computer to have the chance to shutdown normally, that's another reason for the UPS. Also, many times you'll get a momentary power glitch that would knock the system off, but with a UPS, you just compute on. :)
 
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