Solved: Overclocking Core 2 Duo E6550

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McNavdo1990

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I am looking to overclock my Core 2 Duo E6550 on a ASUS P5K motherboard which is currently running at it's stock speed of 2.33GHz. I have been reading up on it and have an understanding of how to achieve the overclock but what I am not sure of is what I could get away with and what I should be changing the values to in the BIOS. I have attached a report of my hardware which I created through AIDA for anyone who is willing to help me out and needs extra information. I would also like to add that this overclock will be a short term thing as I will be upgrading to a new motherboard, ram and an i5 processor in the next few weeks. I appreciate any help that you can give me.
 

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crjdriver

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Have you read the overclocking guide at the top of the page?

I am not sure of is what I could get away with
There is NO safe overclock. Do not overclock with parts you cannot afford to replace.

Whatever overclock [if any] you can achieve, is predicated on ALL of your hardware including the pw supply. OEM type pw supplies are just not going to overclock well. If you have a corsair, seasonic, pcpower&cooling or other high end pw supply, that increases your chances of achieving an overclock.
 

crjdriver

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Since you have an asus board, the very first thing I would do would be to download the latest version of probe from the support page for your board. Install probe and get a baseline of temps and voltages while running a stress test app like prime95. Once you get an idea of your temps and voltages while under 100% load, enter the bios and up the FSB from the stock of 333 to something like 340. Save settings and restart. Run prime95 for at least 15min and check your temps. If all is well ie no errors and temps are ok, restart and enter the bios. Up the FSB to 345 or so; repeat the stability test. Keep going until temps rise too high or you get errors or a reboot. When you do, then either up vcore or back-off to a known stable overclock.

Remember if an overclock is not prime95 stable, it is worthless.
 

McNavdo1990

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Since you have an asus board, the very first thing I would do would be to download the latest version of probe from the support page for your board. Install probe and get a baseline of temps and voltages while running a stress test app like prime95. Once you get an idea of your temps and voltages while under 100% load, enter the bios and up the FSB from the stock of 333 to something like 340. Save settings and restart. Run prime95 for at least 15min and check your temps. If all is well ie no errors and temps are ok, restart and enter the bios. Up the FSB to 345 or so; repeat the stability test. Keep going until temps rise too high or you get errors or a reboot. When you do, then either up vcore or back-off to a known stable overclock.

Remember if an overclock is not prime95 stable, it is worthless.
Thanks for your help. I've managed to turn the FSB to 385 with a max temp of 62 degrees on both cores which leaves me a few degrees below the max of 72 degrees so will see how that works for a while.
 

Triple6

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With a better cooler you may be able to go much higher. I still have a PC with an Asus P5K-E motherboard and an E6550 as a spare but it use to be my main PC. With an aftermarket Zalman 9700 cooler and stock voltage I was able to run that processor at 3.33Ghz 100% stable for years. Thats a 475Mhz FSB or 1900Mhz effective bus speed. But it's all up to luck too, some won't come close to that, for that matter I could not get the system to even boot properly at a single megaherz higher without error but at 475 absolutely no problems during any benchmarks, tests, or games.
 

McNavdo1990

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With a better cooler you may be able to go much higher. I still have a PC with an Asus P5K-E motherboard and an E6550 as a spare but it use to be my main PC. With an aftermarket Zalman 9700 cooler and stock voltage I was able to run that processor at 3.33Ghz 100% stable for years. Thats a 475Mhz FSB or 1900Mhz effective bus speed. But it's all up to luck too, some won't come close to that, for that matter I could not get the system to even boot properly at a single megaherz higher without error but at 475 absolutely no problems during any benchmarks, tests, or games.
I've turned it up to 400 now with the max temperature staying around 63 degrees when using Prime95. I've been looking around the Bios and I know that sometimes the CPU voltage and Ram speed can sometimes have an affect, both are set to Auto on the Bios but do you think it would make any difference if I was to change them and if so what would you recommend? I would imagine those settings would all depend on the system itself
 

Triple6

Rob
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Increasing the voltage can improve stability at higher overclocks, but that also brings a lot more risk for damage to the processor. I wouldn't increase the voltage until you find the system becomes unstable and then only by small increments and never beyond 1.5v for those chips, in fact you probably shouldn't go above 1.45. For me i didn't need to increase the voltage at all and increasing the voltage beyond the 475Mhz FSB wall didn't help whatsoever. But it does indeed depend on each individual chip and motherboard.
 
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