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Solved: Raid levels

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Skynrd, Jan 24, 2011.

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  1. Skynrd

    Skynrd Thread Starter

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    I've gotten conflicting descriptions on Raid levels. All I want to do is have a mirrored copy for redundancy, but also have protection against system failure do to a hard drive failure.

    I was given the impression that raid 1 would do that. I want to run a raid array of 2 drives for my OS so system keeps running under a drive failure and until bad drive is replaced and still be able to work while the replacement drive is rebuilding.

    Also run a second array with same functionality for media storage.

    Which level would be required or is this hardware and software dependent?
     
  2. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    It is RAID 1 for mirroring, but I would suggest that doesn't protect you as well as an image of the system partition, made and set aside for a rainy day; subsequently imaging just before a major change and then just after if all goes well is also a good idea. That way not only can you get that image off site to be better protected against natural disaster but also have a good copy preserved; in RAID 1 if one gets corrupted, then so does the other.
    So RAID 1 basically only protects you if one drive up and dies a natural death, whereas an image protects you in many more ways. You will have a little more down time with an image, unless the RAID 1 doesn't fail in the only way it can and still be of use, in that case the RAID 1 will have a lot more down time.
     
  3. Skynrd

    Skynrd Thread Starter

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    Yes I do keep a copy of the drive at home. This is on a computer which I use to DJ at clubs, so I'm not online when doing so. The hard drive being the most likely to physically fail as to my understanding. There is nothing being done but playing music which I want stored on a separate Raid 1 with my 2 1TB drives so music will still be available if I loose a 1TB drive and should actually speed up a search for a song, Correct? And a single OS drive failure which would be a raid 1 80gb pair should keep me going until I bring it home replace & rebuild with a new drive.
     
  4. Noyb

    Noyb Trusted Advisor

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    I'm in favor of Raid JBOD ... (Just a Bunch Of discs)
    In case of a crash or corruption ... my Next System drives are already built .. (Fresh System installs)
    If disc 0 crashes .. I can boot to disc 1 .. Or physically swap Disks 0 <> 6
    In case of a total drive failure, I still have two copies of my Data.
     

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  5. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Raid of any type is NOT a backup plan. It is hardware redundant only. What happens when you get a virus, malware, corrupted driver install, accidentally delete a file, etc? Every error is mirrored.

    I always recommend against raid for the home user; raid is for servers that need drive redundancy and hot swap/rebuild capability. Next if you really really must have raid, then buy a real raid card like a promise or highpoint card. IMO onboard raid is less than useless. Here is an example of a decent raid controller. There is a reason why they cost as much or more than a mb; performance and reliability.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16816102080

    Image the raid array to a third hard drive, NAS, network share, etc. If you have a problem, then you can restore the image.
     
  6. calvin-c

    calvin-c Banned

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    With 2 drives the only RAID level that allows redundancy is RAID 1. That will keep your system running when one drive fails, but it'll probably be hardware dependent. If you think about it, software RAID requires that the system boot before the RAID software is loaded-so your boot drive really can't be part of the RAID array (in this scenario). Hardware RAID has the RAID software on the controller so it's loaded as part of the BIOS, thus allowing you to boot from the RAID array.

    You could implement the second RAID array via software though since you won't be booting from it. Note that RAID only protects you against drive failure-if the controller fails then you can't boot from either drive, and if a corrupted driver is installed then it'll be installed to both drives, etc. Or Noyb's solution if your software works with it. Mine won't-I'd need to manually copy everything whenever I made changes, whether that be creating a new document or installing a new driver. RAID is pretty automatic, for me.
     
  7. fairnooks

    fairnooks Banned

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    Ok, yes, I mean, no!...its not a bad way to go and there's only so much one can do when going mobile like that. If it were me, I would prefer to have a seperate USB drive with the data on it and even a clone disk of the OS, so its ready to swap out at any time, both of which travel securely and seperately from the computer (actually, I'd probably carry a spare computer) so they are not subject to whatever accident might befall with all the eggs in one basket, so to speak.
    But if you are always very physically careful with the equipment and that sort of thing just never happens to you, it is a bit more convenient to carry all your eggs in one basket, so to speak. So, yes....and no.:p
     
  8. Skynrd

    Skynrd Thread Starter

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    I thank everyone for the info. Raid 1 is what I'm looking for.I do carry my duplicate drives and my laptop for backup. And give myself enough time if I had a problem before starting to change out whatever. Once I'm up and running I don't do anything that would corrupt the programs or hard drives from functioning. I'm just looking to keep running. In a five hour job even a 1/2 hour of down time is not a good thing.
     
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