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Solved: Rookie question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by Skivvywaver, Jan 24, 2006.

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  1. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver Thread Starter

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    Folks, I am trying to catalog my wife's life and I want to get this right. I am making some CD's and and using a scanner using the highest DPI setting but I need to know what format will transfer better to CD so that her family can have their own photos made.

    Unfortunately this is because my wife is recently deseased as some of you know. Would tiff be the best? I know JPEG is "lossy" and not the best but photography is not, and never will be my thing. This is a one time deal and I just want to do the best I can.
     
  2. linskyjack

    linskyjack

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    jpeg is the most common photographic format. Pretty much anyone can open them.
     
  3. 911

    911

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    Unless you expect them to make large prints, I would use Jpeg, too. You can set it for the highest quality, and it will look good in almost any viewer. Most digital cameras default to Jpeg. If you save the original scans in Bitmap or Tiff, you could always send them a better copy of any particular photo.
     
  4. hewee

    hewee

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  5. KMW

    KMW

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    I save mine in tiff as well, for the reasons hewee points to.

    quality
     
  6. hewee

    hewee

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    Yea with all the time you have to take to scan all the images you may as well make them all good as you can because then you will have better use of them for other things like prints etc.

    Even if you did use .jpg make sure you do not compress them. But tiff and png would be best and they are not compress.
     
  7. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver Thread Starter

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    That is what I thought, .tiff is the better for making pictures from them and that is my intention. I have quite a few I want to get made for myself and quite a few I want to share with her family. My originals are not leaving my house, they are not for loan to anybody so I will make a CDrom and anybody that asks for pictures will get a disk burned for them.

    I will scan them at the highest DPI my scanner will do and save them as .tiff. Becky was our family photographer and she is hard to find pictures of unfortunately. I should have taken the camera from her more often but you never think about stuff like that at the time. I have more pictures of my stupid dogs than I do of my wife.

    Hindsight is 20/20. :(
     
  8. etaf

    etaf Moderator

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    make sure you use good quality CD's and I would suggest your make two CD's just in case one fails at any time.
     
  9. buck52

    buck52 Banned

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    A thought for you

    Saving a .jpg to .tiff does not increase the quality of the original much if any... it allows you to work on the tiff with out further compression... The software will interpolate to the size you have set no matter what/if ... ie... 8x10 300 dpi... 3x5 200 dpi

    buck
     
  10. belithrawien

    belithrawien

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    Just a small note of my own , I did this for a friend who lost his Mom quite suddenly,
    and photos were scarce. I scanned and archived them as png files, as well as tiff's, and burned them to several dvd's to archive. Then I converted them to jpegs and burned them to cd, to dispense and use as they willed, keeping the lossless full res archived away.
     
  11. slipe

    slipe

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    You are spinning your wheels scanning at higher than 300 PPI. You will just get enormous files with no more detail scanning higher than that. Go to the next page where he uses a shot taken with a fixed focal length Nikon on a tripod and couldn’t get more detail over 300 PPI. http://scantips.com/basics08.html

    You won’t see any difference in a print made from a TIFF and from a highest quality JPG. But many scanners don’t give you a quality choice in JPG so it is best to scan as a TIFF. A 4 X 6 print scanned at 300 PPI is only around a 2Mb TIFF, so it isn’t really necessary to convert to JPG. If you do convert to JPG, use a program that gives a quality choice and use best quality. I recommend the free Irfanview at 100% quality. www.irfanview.com
     
  12. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver Thread Starter

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    I have paint shop pro 9 as well as photoimpact 10 to work with the photos for mailing and such. I really like PSP for this work. I am not good at "fixing" bad shots with anything. I always seem to try to get them "just a little better" and screw them up and have to start working all over again. I keep the original scans on my slave drive and save the "fixed" pictures to my C drive so I never totally destroy a shot or a scan.

    I will just scan them and burn them to the disk. I am saving as .tiff and I have bought a 25 pack of DVDs to burn them to. Size doesn't matter so I scan them heavily. I have a few I want to have 8x10's made from and they are snapshots. I scan those at 600 DPI hoping the quality will still be there when they "stretch" them out. Maybe it will work, maybe it won't. I have to try though.
     
  13. D0C_Hol1d@y

    [email protected]

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    hold on video and print are two different things. You are using these for a photo slide show? will you print them later? in any case the best way to save a ton of pictures is as a jpg or jpeg file format. Video doesn't need as many pixels as a print does. So if you save the photos to be displayed only on a TV you don't need large files. Making it possible to put thousands on cd. you only need 72 dpi for TV and 300 for print. If you are printing yourself on a inkjet you can get away with 150 dpi. That will save you some ink. Not to mention hours of scanning will be reduced because of the scan times for 150 and 300 are night and day. Trust me 150 to 200 DPI scans will be fine for non commercial use. 300 DPI is usually used for commercial professional offset printing. Inkjets are definately not in that catagory.
     
  14. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver Thread Starter

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    These are for print and I will have them done at a store. I want real pictures instead of inkjet.
     
  15. buck52

    buck52 Banned

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    must be a qoute from the dark ages... ;)

    My Epson 2200 produces prints as good as any store... as far as the dozen or so people I print for are concerned

    buck
     
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