1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Solved: So Confused and feeling dumb!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by tamilynn63, Jan 27, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. tamilynn63

    tamilynn63 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    250
    I have been working with graphics programs now for 2-3 years. I do a lot of things needed for work but still just an amateur. It is never more apparent (my amateur status) than it is now when I am supposed to be updating our web site and all of my new stuff is creating larger files than the images that are currently in place.
    I am sizing them the same and I upload them and they are bigger. I thought I was going crazy so I tried this. I downloaded one from our site and tried the following just for an example.
    The photo is
    6KB/6542bytes 275w x160h pixels /res 305
    then I did nothing more than reduce the resolution down to 92. The size of the object stayed the same , still 275x160 pixels. I go to upload it and now it is twice the size than it was before I reduced the pixels. :eek: The reduced pixels made the photo only slightly smaller but bigger files. Our web master is going to kill me if I update with larger files sizes. What is the deal? Am I missing something?:confused:
    using Serif Photo Plus 10

    I attached both photos.

    before: 6KB/6542bytes 275w x160h /res 305
    after: 13KB/13841 and still 275x160 pixels resolution is 92
     

    Attached Files:

  2. buck52

    buck52 Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2001
    Messages:
    8,373
    Are they saved as the same file type?

    Are they saved at the same compression?
     
  3. tamilynn63

    tamilynn63 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    250
    as you can see I included both of the photos. I saved them the same way and they are not compressed. both are jpg
     
  4. buck52

    buck52 Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2001
    Messages:
    8,373
    Jpg is a compressed format... most good programs allow you to control the amount of compression

    The image on the right is a better quality image to my eye

    buck
     
  5. D0C_Hol1d@y

    [email protected]

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    944
    two things actually. 1, the amount of compression applied and 2, are you saving a preview icon with the file? nIf you are that can lead to a larger size file than needed.
     
  6. tamilynn63

    tamilynn63 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    250
    no. I am not doing anything other than downloading it from our server and opening it with my photo program. I saved both the exact same way
     
  7. D0C_Hol1d@y

    [email protected]

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    944
    it doesn't make any sense at all. Changing the DPI without changing the actual pixels should not effect image size at all. The pixel information dictates the size not the DPI for instance if I had an image 200 pixels wide set at 600 DPI and an image 200 pixels wide at 72 DPI they should be the same size because there is the same amount of information on each image. The print size changes but a web browser has no idea what print size is. I think it's that program you're using. Can't your company afford professional software?
     
  8. tamilynn63

    tamilynn63 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    250
    you have never used Serif apparently.
     
  9. erick295

    erick295

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2005
    Messages:
    2,208
    This happened because you saved the new JPEG with a higher quality compression than the old one. To correct this, change the JPEG compression level when you save your images. A level of about 60% usually works for photos. If that file is 13-14KB, then you are probably using something close to 100%.

    You should know that what you are doing is unneccessary to begin with. There is no reason for you to change the DPI unless the image is being printed. It might save you some time to know that :)
     
  10. hewee

    hewee

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    57,791
    The type of compression in your options can also change the file size even if you save it at 100%(no compression) on a .jpg

    On the Somma-Aire-4-Star-Cutaway, 6KB/6542bytes 275w x160h /res 305
    Using PhotoImpact I opened it up and picked saved and it was bigger under each compression type too so I don't know what is going on.
    Same thing happen using PSP.


    You can try this to clean up added junk other programs may of added to the file.

    JPG Cleaner v2.6

    http://www.rainbow-software.org/programs.html#JPG Cleaner

    Just unzip it to its own folder and read the readme.
     
  11. lister

    lister

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,993
    To parrot what everyone else has said, adjust the compression settings when you save the jpeg (btw, repeated editing of a jpeg will degrade the image no matter what compression setting is used).

    Seems like Serif also adds some metadata to the image as well.

    A pro graphics program like Photoshop or Fireworks would suit you better in the long run if you need to continue image editing.

    I think this thread should be marked as solved.
     
  12. buck52

    buck52 Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2001
    Messages:
    8,373
    Hi lister... until tamilynn63 requests it, I think the thread should stay open

    tamilynn63 needs to come to grips with the compression/resolution thing

    I, as well as any of you, can save his/her original at the same file size by setting the compression amount...

    One question would be... why are the images being resize to begin with?

    buck
     
  13. lister

    lister

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Messages:
    1,993
    Good point Buck.
    Tamilynn63, resolution makes no difference for web images - images will display the same whether at 300 ppi, or 92 ppi; the pixel dimensions are the main consideration.
     
  14. ChuckE

    ChuckE

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Messages:
    2,311
    Hoping to clarify... the DPI information is NOT what you want to change.
    The webpage will almost always display an image depending upon the pixel quantities of the horizontal and vertical dimension.
    Such as, a picture of 400x300 (HxV) will be half the size of another picture that measures 800x600 (you might argue that is 1/4th the size - if you are talking area - I am not).

    Pictures that are in the JPG file format are in a compressed format. JPG has an adjustable amount of how much you want your image compressed. The more compression you "dial in" the more detail you are going to lose. Any graphic program, worth anything, that saves in the JPG format, will allow you to adjust how much compression you desire. It is possible to have a JPG image that is smaller (pixel-wise) than some other picture, and still have it take more bytes as a file. It all depends upon what the picture is and how much compression is used.

    All that probably does not help you in your current situation. If you want images to appear to be the same size, then you have to ensure that your pixel dimensions are identical.

    OK, now if you think you got all that, you might now be wondering what is the DPI value you have been changing, and what is it used for?
    Some printing programs, and a few graphics programs, might use the DPI value to "know" how physically large to print the image at. Or conversely, at what resolution to print at.
    For example, if you have a 600x300 pixel image, and it has the DPI set at 75DPI, then the image will print out at a 8"x4" size. If you take that very same image, and use a tool to change the DPI value to 300DPI, then that very same image (still 600x300 pixels) will now print out at a 2"x1" size.
    Note that the image in either instance (still 600x300 pixels) will probably show identical in size on a web page, or in most graphic viewers. It is only the printing that will be affected by the changed DPI value. (All that can still be overridden by your webpage parameters or your particular image viewer, but usually, what I've said is true.)

    I have attached 4 identical appearing images. All in JPG format, all taking up nearly identical number of bytes, all are the same dimensions (512x384 pixels) but the DPI information is different. The four DPI values are 1000, 300, 72 and finally 2 DPI, check out the name of each file. If you open these images up in most image viewers you will probably see that that appear to be identical. But if you use a program that uses the DPI value to either show it on the screen, or (more likely) to print it out, you will see they print out at four different hardcopy sizes. You can override that size to print any of them out (the one at 2 DPI is unlikely to print out on your printer - unless you have a printer that can actually print out at a 256"x192" or 22x16 foot size ;) )
     

    Attached Files:

  15. hewee

    hewee

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    Messages:
    57,791
    Great info Chuck. I just downloaded and looked at each image and they do like you said all look the same. Then I can look at the info on each to see the print size.
     
  16. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/437690

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice