Solved: Story of Windows NT

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Geminiadam

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I'm curious, what is the story of Windows NT? I received several still-sealed copies of Windows NT, and I want to know if Windows NT is any good. I noticed that it is listed with Win 2000 and Win XP on this forum and not with Win 9x and ME. What's the story? Would it be cool to still use?


***EDIT*** I'm talking about Win NT Workstation, not Win NT Server. I also have Service Pack 4 for this as well.
 
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It's very old now. We're talking Windows 98 age range. Good luck finding drivers. Better just use the CD's as coasters.
 

Geminiadam

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I was just curious as I still use win 98 on an old Gateway laptop and was wanting to try it out.
 
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Microsoft doesnt support Win 98 anymore. This has been the case for some time. My sister in law still has a computer with Win 98 on it and it is a nightmare at times to tech and fix.
 
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WinNT was first released in 1993 (NT 3.1). It's the first true 32 bit operating system from Microsoft. Win1.0-3.11 and Win9x/WinME are 16/32 bit hybrids.
It actually started as version 3 of OS/2 aka NT OS/2 (jointly developed by IBM and MS), but when MS decided to change the API from OS/2 to Windows due to the success of Windows 3.0, they had a falling out with IBM and changed it to Windows NT.

NT is not based on MS-DOS, but it's command line interface has pretty much the same commands. It is not a plug and play operating system, so installing hardware can often be a hassle as resources like IRQ's, Memory, and I/O addresses often have to be manually set. On a laptop this also means you can't plug in or remove a PCMCIA/Cardbus card without shutting down first (at least not without 3rd party apps that often created more issues).

NT 4.0 borrowed the look of Win95, but as it was designed more for business use, it's not that great as a gaming system, as drivers for high end video/audio cards often don't exist, and many games won't run on it at all

Win2K added plug-n-play hardware installation, but is still NT based, as are all later versions of windows.

For basic computing on older systems (pentiums) I've found NT 4.0 to be more stable, and slightly faster at number crunching than win98, 98SE, or WinME. Prime95 typically runs 2-5% faster on NT for example. For PII systems I prefer Win2K.

The latest SP for NT 4.0 is 6a, and can be downloaded from here:
Downloads for Windows NT

You'd definitely want to make sure that your laptop is compatible with NT 4.0 -- some laptops simply wouldn't run it, or needed a different BIOS. Also make sure you can get the drivers from Gateway for your laptop. Hopefully they have a guide for installing NT as well, as you'll likely have to change settings in the BIOS due to it not being Plug and Play.

Certainly not a step up, but if you have an older system and time to play, it can be educational.

Jerry
 

Geminiadam

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Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
118
WinNT was first released in 1993 (NT 3.1). It's the first true 32 bit operating system from Microsoft. Win1.0-3.11 and Win9x/WinME are 16/32 bit hybrids.
It actually started as version 3 of OS/2 aka NT OS/2 (jointly developed by IBM and MS), but when MS decided to change the API from OS/2 to Windows due to the success of Windows 3.0, they had a falling out with IBM and changed it to Windows NT.

NT is not based on MS-DOS, but it's command line interface has pretty much the same commands. It is not a plug and play operating system, so installing hardware can often be a hassle as resources like IRQ's, Memory, and I/O addresses often have to be manually set. On a laptop this also means you can't plug in or remove a PCMCIA/Cardbus card without shutting down first (at least not without 3rd party apps that often created more issues).

NT 4.0 borrowed the look of Win95, but as it was designed more for business use, it's not that great as a gaming system, as drivers for high end video/audio cards often don't exist, and many games won't run on it at all

Win2K added plug-n-play hardware installation, but is still NT based, as are all later versions of windows.

For basic computing on older systems (pentiums) I've found NT 4.0 to be more stable, and slightly faster at number crunching than win98, 98SE, or WinME. Prime95 typically runs 2-5% faster on NT for example. For PII systems I prefer Win2K.

The latest SP for NT 4.0 is 6a, and can be downloaded from here:
Downloads for Windows NT

You'd definitely want to make sure that your laptop is compatible with NT 4.0 -- some laptops simply wouldn't run it, or needed a different BIOS. Also make sure you can get the drivers from Gateway for your laptop. Hopefully they have a guide for installing NT as well, as you'll likely have to change settings in the BIOS due to it not being Plug and Play.

Certainly not a step up, but if you have an older system and time to play, it can be educational.

Jerry
That was the whole point in what I was asking. Thanks for taking the time to explain it to me, I understand it much better.
 
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