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Solved: Windows 2003 Server as Router

Discussion in 'Networking' started by karl_009, Aug 7, 2008.

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  1. karl_009

    karl_009 Thread Starter

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    Hello,

    Am looking at configuring one of are Windows 2003 Servers as a Router.

    I have gone though the basic set-up which was;

    1. Start RRAS by going to Start | All Programs | Administrative Tools | Routing and Remote Access.
    2. Locate the server in the left-hand pane, and right-click it.
    3. Select Configure and Enable Routing And Remote Access from the shortcut menu. This launches a wizard.
    4. On the first step of the wizard, select Custom Configuration, and click Next.
    5. On the Custom Configuration page in the wizard, select the LAN Routing option.
    6. Click Next, and click Finish.

    In the RRAS window, right-click the server, and select Properties. On the General tab, you'll see the Enable This Computer as a Router option selected, along with the Perform LAN Routing Only option. On the IP tab, you'll see the Enable IP Routing option selected.


    An yet I am still unable to connect to the other side.

    The setup that is required is;

    The main network which is 10.15.1.x 255.255.0.0 and on the other network is two routers which connect to a WAN, the internal IP addresses are 10.15.127.254, 10.15.127.253 and a HSRP address of 10.15.127.252 and the subnet mask of 255.255.0.0.

    The routers are connected via a hub and the server with the RRAS is also connected to the hub, I am able to ping the LAN but unable to ping the routers but if i disable the NIC connected to the LAN I am able to ping the routers then.

    Any ideas what might be causing this?

    Many Thanks
    Karl
     
  2. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    If I understand you correctly, the 10.15.1.0/16 network is hanging off of one NIC of the server and the 10.15.127.0/16 is the other network hanging off the second NIC to connect to the routers. If this is correct, your subnet mask is wrong. Both networks are presenting to be on the same network. Your subnet mask needs to be /24 or 255.255.255.0.
     
  3. karl_009

    karl_009 Thread Starter

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    So because they are using the same subnet mask of 255.255.0 0 or /16 the RRAS see's them as the same network.

    So in order to solve this its best if the routers that are on the 10.15.217.x are put on a 255.255.255.0 or /24 subnet mask that way the 2003 would be able to route them and the server would become the default gateway for the rest if the main network.

    Just one thing would a Cisco router be able to route between two networks that are physically separate but with the same IP addressing scheme.

    Many Thanks for your help.
    Karl
     
  4. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Yes. Because both subnets are really the same network, your server has no way of being able to best choose which interface to talk out of to gain access to the 10.15.0.0 block which is what you set when you used the 255.255.0.0 mask. This also explains why when you pull the cable to the 10.15.1.0 connected NIC, you regained communication to the 10.15.127.0. It boils down to which NIC is bound first and has highest priority.

    You would have to set the /24 subnet mask for both interfaces on your server. Even if you set a /24 on one and not the other, you're going to confuse your server's routing because the other will still have a /16 which encompasses the range you set by using the /24 mask.

    I'm assuming when you say same IP addressing scheme, you mean they are logically on the same subnet. If that is the case, no. Routing is a layer 3 function. If the IPs you are trying to talk between are on the same subnet, no routing is needed and the router won't forward the packets even if the two networks are separated physically.
     
  5. karl_009

    karl_009 Thread Starter

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    Thank you for that information, itÂ’s been very helpful.

    The task that was set was to put a router between the routers that connect to a data centre and are local network, the routers that connect to the data centre have been given the IP address of 10.15.127.x/16 which is similar to are internal network of 10.15.1.x/16.

    The router in between they say into become the default gateway and a way of controlling what gets on to the local LAN.

    Dose this configuration make sense to you, or is who planning this out got a bit wrong somewhere?

    Thanks again.
    Karl
     
  6. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Well, based on what you've given me, someone has to give in on how their IP addressing scheme is. Either you or the datacenter. I doubt the datacenter is going to cave in and change their IP addressing scheme. So it looks like you'll probably have to change your scheme.

    There is one way which you can probably preserve your IP scheme but it's a long shot and this is assuming you won't be addressing any resources directly at the data center on the network 10.15.0.0. You can slide another router between your server and the datacenter. You can make the network between the server and the router be something like 192.168.1.0/24 or whatever. The interface where the new router and the datacenter's routers connect would be anything on the 10.15.0.0. It could be 10.15.100.1 for the new router. It really doesn't matter as they're all on the same network. You now must have this new router NAT any addresses coming from your internal side to the datacenter.

    I don't know what your using this connection to the datacenter for...whether you're trying to access some resource there or if it's your default gateway out to the internet. A lot of how you plan out your integration plan is based on what this connection to the datacenter is doing.
     
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