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Some help please in trying to use an SCSI hard drive.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by john1, Oct 5, 2008.

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  1. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi,

    I've just bought some hard drives.
    They weren't expensive, i got them in a clearance sale, they are SCSI types.

    One of my PCs uses an SCSI hard drive as its local drive 'C',
    However this PC has a power supply feed to the SCSI hard drive, and also the
    SCSI connector ribbon cable.
    Thats two separate cables.
    One for signal, and one for supply.

    The SCSI hard drives i bought have no feed point for a power supply.

    So i don't know how to try them.
    They must use some supply to operate, so could it come via the SCSI cable ?
    I suppose it must come from there ... ?

    Ive never seen ones like this before.

    I dont want to try them without checking first.
    Any comments or suggestions would be welcome.

    Model: WDE18300-6029A8
    Made: 26th May 1999

    I got eight in all, some like this one, and some others.
    Now i'm a bit worried about trying them, as they might try to draw more current
    from the SCSI signal wires than they were meant to give.
    These ones come in a sort of Slot-in carrier, what difference that might make
    i don't know.

    Cheers, John :)
     

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  2. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    Hi John, long time no see!

    Sounds like these may have an 80 pin SCA connector (see top pic in attached, bottom is 68 pin), designed for hot swap drives.

    If that's the case, you need an adapter to convert them to 68 pin+power, just search for SCA to 68 pin adapter

    Jerry
     

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  3. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi Outcaste,

    Yes, you are quite right. That picture shows exactly what is what.
    However, i only paid a few quid for a bunch of these drives, and those adapters you mention cost about twenty quid each.

    They are each on a sort of 'carrier' and curiously i was given a unit last year which looks like it will accept them on their 'carriers', i don't know what this unit is, i could take a picture and post it.
    It sort of looks like a special computer.
    If it will accept these drives (complete with their carriers) then maybe i can still use them.

    That would be better for me than buying adapters for each of the drives, cos i got the drives quite cheap.

    I am going to see if that unit has a name on it, or any numbers.

    Cheers, John :)
     
  4. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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  5. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi Outcaste,

    Hope things are well with you.
    Things are Ok here, except for the usual money worries. Which seem to be bothering everyone now.

    I did have a look at a few sites selling the adapters, but they were all much dearer than that.
    That site is very reasonable indeed, its probably worth getting a few from there.

    Just been looking at that unit i was given last year, by a friend who was moving house.
    Its in an awkward place, but i managed to see the name, its called a 'Compaq Proliant'
    I have no idea what it is, but its not an ordinary PC.
    It has slots for eight items that can plug into it.

    That box of hard drives i got at a clearance sale a few days ago, has eight drives, and they look like they might plug into that 'Proliant' thing.

    Maybe they could then be accessed by my PC ... ??

    Included are pics of the box of drives, bought cos i noticed they were SCSI, not realising that they were not the type of SCSI that i expected.
    And a pic of a 'carrier' with a drive in it.
    And 2 pics of the 'Compaq Proliant'.

    If you know what that unit is, i would be interested. I will be Googling it anyway.

    Cheers, John :)
     

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  6. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    It seems that the Compaq Proliant range covers a lot of machines.
    I'll have to go back and see if i can find a number somewhere on it.

    John :)
     
  7. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    The unit with it is a 'Compaq Proliant 2500R' and i think they are a pair.
    Couldn't find any (sensible) numbers on the stacking or racking bit.
    The guy that gave me it didn't say much about it, only that he was
    going to use it, but never got round to it.
    It appears that it might be some sort of server arrangement.

    I know very little about servers.

    John :)
     
  8. TheOutcaste

    TheOutcaste

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    You'd definitely need the model number. The hot swap bays are for SCSI drives configured in a RAID array. As that is a server, you should have RAID 5 as well as RAID 0 and RAID 1.
    Hopefully the system already has an OS installed, and has the tools to configure the raid array, otherwise you'd need to download them from the HP web site.
    The carriers are Compaq, hopefully they will work. Don't know hardly anything about the Proliant line so don't know if they have different versions of carriers such that a particular carrier will only work in a particular model.

    Once configured, you can access them as a shared network drive.

    Sounds like your chance to learn more about servers.

    Here's the web page for info:
    Proliant 2500 Series

    Jerry
     
  9. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi,

    Thanks for the web page info.
    I will read up a bit on it, but not tonight.

    'hot swap bays' ?? i take it thats the slots ... ?

    RAID ??

    "as that is a server" So its a server.

    This made me perk up ...
    "Once configured, you can access them as a shared network drive."

    That sounds very interesting, that i would definitely like to do.
    That alone might make it worth getting it up and running.

    I will try to check up on the carriers to see if they will suit.

    John :)
     
  10. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    "Hot swap" means the hardware can be connected and disconnected while the computer is on and running (i.e. the term "hot").

    RAID is a type of hard drive configuration. It does not mean "server" as that is a type of computer, defined by either physical hardware or purpose.

    You're likely going to suck a ton of power running all these drives. Is this just a fun hobby for you, or did you plan to actually run these? A rack server is going to sound like a small jet plane revving up, and you'll notice a definite increase in your power bill.

    The reason the drives were cheap is because they probably contain all sorts of nasty, toxic components that a disposal company would have actually charged them to get rid of. This is a common ploy by companies to save money. They just foist the costs and environmental hazards onto unsuspecting bargain hunting geeks.
     
  11. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi,

    So it seems i was given a 'Compaq Proliant 2500R' server unit, with its associated rack unit, which is apparently power hungry.
    And the Scsi drives i bought might actually cost money to get rid of.

    I never even considered that the hard drives might cost money for disposal.

    I will have to have a re-think.

    Maybe getting some of those adapters is the way to go, then i could just use those drives as and when i want to.

    Our local (free) domestic refuse centre has a section for computer stuff, i think they pass crate-loads of the stuff on to places for re-use, or recycling.

    It might be possible to fix it up so that it will only start if its accessed. If its put out of the way somewhere, and only used for back-ups or storing infrequently accessed information, then maybe it could be used 'as-is'. Dunno, i will have to think about it.

    Cheers, John :)
     
  12. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    I wouldn't recommend using the drive as back up storage. They're clearly old and probably heavily used. They likely only have an expected life span of about 3 years.
     
  13. john1

    john1 Thread Starter

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    Hi,

    Well ive had a bit of a think.
    Cant see that i have any use for a server on that scale, interesting though it sounds.

    I think i'll get some of those adapters, and try out all these drives. I can run scandisk on them, and maybe spinrite. Any of the drives that have excessive un-useable sectors would be regarded as risky.

    Thats about as far as i'm prepared to go for the time being.
    I now have a much better idea of what they are, what they're for, and what that Proliant is all about.

    Many thanks to TheOutcaste and to DoubleHelix for their explanations and suggestions.

    Regards, John :)
     
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