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Sql / T-sql

Discussion in 'Web Design & Development' started by Couriant, Apr 18, 2008.

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  1. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    What is the difference between the two?
     
  2. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    T-SQL:

    Peace...
     
  3. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    OK, thanks :) if I wanted to go into SQL/T-SQL/mySQL, which one would you recommend?

    The reason I ask is that my bro-in-law is looking for someone to trust for his line of work and his system/databases is his livelyhood. I was thinking on helping him.
     
  4. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    Structured Query Language (SQL) is a standard language used to query Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). MySQL is a RDBMS like Oracle, DB2, Informix, Sybase, MS SQL Server, and others. Since T-SQL is a proprietary Microsoft extension to SQL, T-SQL statements won't be as "portable" (for lack of a better term) across various RDBMS implementations like standard SQL (or ANSI SQL) is.

    I would learn standard SQL and stay away from the proprietary extensions. Once you get good with standard SQL, you'll be able to readily use any modern/current RDBMS without much of a learning curve. Each RDBMS has its own intricacies but having a strong standard SQL background will allow you to write queries that will work with most RDBMS implementations without much tweaking, if any at all.

    You CAN use standard SQL to query Microsoft databases (SQL Server, Access, etc) so don't think you'll need T-SQL in order to use Microsoft databases.

    Peace...
     
  5. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    Hmm..


    OK i will look into those. I think I have SQL Server at home so I will install that.

    Thanks for the help so far... i will play around with it. Be on the lookout for my questions :)
     
  6. Couriant

    Couriant Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    Is there any major differences in SQL Server 2000 and 2003
     
  7. tomdkat

    tomdkat Retired Trusted Advisor

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    Those are Microsoft database server versions, similar to "MS Office 2003 and MS Office 2007". MS SQL Server 2003 is a newer version of MS SQL Server 2000. You should be able to look at the product descriptions for each to see what the differences are.

    Peace...
     
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