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Static IP from ISP on Windows Server w/DHCP

Discussion in 'Networking' started by techwrecked, Aug 22, 2011.

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  1. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    Hi, I hope the title didn't confuse you...
    I'm totally new to using Windows Server 2003 (or any windows server edition) but I do have a basic understand of networking. :D

    Ok, so here's what's going on... I have a machine with Windows Server 2003 running an Exchange Server in a office with 5 workstations attached. The server is being used for a basic outlook calendar across the various workstations, nothing major. Our current ISP provides us with a Static IP address. The party that installed and configured the server set it up to run the DHCP server on the server PC itself. As in, the machine running windows server is also running a software DHCP server for the entire network.

    THE SETUP: As of right now we have a wall port (internet access) with a cable running to a 8 port unmanaged netgear switch that has cables hooked up to the 5 workstations as well as the server itself. Pretty simple.

    THE QUESTION: How do I configure the ISP static settings on the DHCP Server portion of the Server PC? We may be getting a new ISP with a dynamic address OR a new static address.

    WHAT I'VE TRIED: I've tried configuring the IP address on the Server PC the way I would via the NIC adapter settings but it already has a internal IP address from the DHCP Server running on that PC so changing that was no good. I guess what I'm basically looking for is a screen like this (I hope you're familiar with the configuration pages of Linksys Routers)
    http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/Claws224/2009-11-28_234053_LinksysSetupScreen.jpg
    [​IMG]

    I hope this all made sense, please post back any questions if you're confused or need clarification and also, please take the time to correct my usage of terms in my explanation if at all possible! :rolleyes:

    Thanks in advance for all your help! :)
     
  2. valis

    valis Moderator

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    I'm going to move this to networking, as you'll get a few more views.

    But what I'm thinking reading this is that your static IP is for your far-side of the router; inside you set it up to assign DHCP addresses to your 5 workstations.
     
  3. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    I'm sorry for posting here but I appriciate the quick response and the relocation of my post.

    Again, I'm sorry but my knowledge is limited and this includes my network terminology... I'm not sure what you mean by "far-side of the router" Isn't the Server PC acting as the router since it's running the DHCP server and assigning the internal IP addresses out to the various workstations?
     
  4. Rockn

    Rockn

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    Is DHCP currently running on the server and assigning IP addresses to the workstations. You do not have to set the ISP's static IP addresses anywhere on the LAN at all. If you want the email server to send and recieve email outside of your LAN you will need to set up port forwarding on the router for SMTP (port 25), DNS (port 53) and forward traffic to your server.
     
  5. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the reply and pardon my ignorance but logic tells me that the Static IP address my ISP gave me has to be entered in somewhere... If i were going to run this setup with DHCP on a router then the Static IP given to me by my ISP would be entered in the page above. (see screenshot in my first post) I just need to know where that configuration page is for the software DHCP servr built into Windows Server 2003.

    To answer your question, Yes, DHCP is currently running on the server and assigning the workstations internal IP addresses ranging from 192.168.2.100-192.168.2.200
     
  6. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    Oh, I forgot to mention I have no email needs at all... Thanks
     
  7. valis

    valis Moderator

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    I'll defer to Rockn this one, but I think we should probably see an ipconfig from the server.......
     
  8. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    I'll get you a screenshot the next time I'm in the office. Nothing is actually wrong with the setup as we speak but when we get a new ISP (which is soon) I'm assuming I'll have to change the Static IP settings to the new Static IP settings somewhere on the server. I just need to know where that configuration page is... It must exist. Please advise.
     
  9. valis

    valis Moderator

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    start > run > ncpa.cpl will take you there.
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    The picture for the configuration page you've put is the correct spot to configure the static IP information you've received from your ISP. This is assuming you only receive one static IP from your ISP. You would then need to configure port forwarding per what Rockn mentioned. You may also have to set up POP3 depending on your setup but it's not as commonly used anymore. Also, for your email server, you want to assign a static private address to it and then make a reservation in the router's DHCP configuration to not use that address or just shrink the DHCP scope so it won't use the address assigned to your email server.
     
  11. valis

    valis Moderator

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    And they will walk you through resetting your router to their specs as well......

    Is everything currently fine with the network?
     
  12. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    Ok, I understand what you guys are saying but I don't think we are on the same page here.

    FACTS:
    1.) I DO NOT have any email needs or concerns.

    2.) I DO NOT own or use a linksys router in this setup. The actual server is the router since it's running the DHCP server. I only used the linksys config page screenshot to illustrate the configuration page I'm looking for on the Windows Server.

    3.) My ISP gave me ONE static IP address.

    4.) The network is CURRENTLY running fine. I will however have to enter in a different static IP address when we change ISP's next week.

    5.) I have ALREADY tried to change the settings at "start > run > ncpa.cpl" but my NIC has an IP address that has been assigned by the DHCP running on that same computer/server.

    Does this make sense?
    Thanks again for everyone's help! =)
     
  13. valis

    valis Moderator

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    1. That makes it easier.

    2. At some place in your network, there is a router/switch that will allow your server to push out IP addresses. The ISP assigns the far side address, you configure the router to push out DHCP OR static addresses. But somewhere there is a router or a switch.

    3. All you need is one static IP; the router will assign the DHCP addresses on your internal network, most likely with 192.160.x.x addresses.

    4. Cool. The new ISP will most likely walk you through most of this; however, you are still going to have to configure your router on the inside; they will most likely not have access to that.

    5. Again, you need to track down the router.
     
  14. techwrecked

    techwrecked Thread Starter

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    ok! so your saying that there has to be a router somewhere??? The server running the DHCP doesn't replace the "router" in this case??? Is it possible that there is just the switch on the floor connecting everything and that the router functionality is being handled by the server's software DHCP server? Thanks!
     
  15. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    I'll take a swing at this.

    How are all the other computers connected? To what device? A router perhaps? Or just a switch?

    If the server is getting a connection from an ISP and providing DHCP services to multiple computers via a switch, then it must have 2 network cards.
     
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