Stop user from installing Windows 11?

Alex Ethridge

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Is there a way to prevent the installation of Windows 11, even if the user does it deliberately? A registry edit, a program, a policy edit (which I know almost nothing about), anything?

I'm trying to prevent a mentally challenged person from destroying her only link to outside the assisted living facility she lives in. When I went there today after she said her "computer won't do anything", I found Windows 11 had been installed, which was totally confusing to her (me too, by the way). She did this same thing when Windows 8 came out and her life coach destroyed the Windows 8 disk to keep her from doing it again. This time, it must have been foisted on her by a M$ upgrade.
 
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flavallee

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You say she's mentally challenged, so I doubt she installed and set up Windows 11 herself.
Does anyone else have access to her computer?

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Alex Ethridge

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Thanks for the reply.

I wish I knew who it is. I'm sure someone beside me is doing something to her computer. I have set up a remote control program on her computer several times that is to run 24/7/365 so I can log in and maintain the computer from my home and reduce the service calls and down time. It runs every time I re-install or re-configure it for just a day or two and is then disabled.

I'm hoping that whomever is screwing things up is not technically savvy enough to undo whatever I might hide in the registry to block Windows 11 (if there is such a thing).

So, what can anyone suggest? Set her up as a guest on her own computer? Set her up maybe as a Standard user instead of Administrator?

Remember, whatever it is, it must prevent even a deliberate attempt.
 

crjdriver

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Alex change the user account now in use to standard so that the person cannot install any new software. Make the admin account in your name with full privileges. Have the system auto log into the standard account and you should not have to worry about any software being installed or whatever.
 

Alex Ethridge

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Alex, I've not tried any of these, and am not endorsing anything, but it is from a reputable source ...

https://www.easeus.com/knowledge-center/stop-windows-11-update.html
Thanks, I found that link and several others similar last night but none are clear to me that they would stop her or an interloper from deliberately overriding those settings.

This may be wrong thinking on my part but we have antiviris on our computers but sometimes when those warnings pop up that something might be unsafe, some users override the warnings and end up with the miscreant anyway. So what about stopping Windows 11 installs when an unwary user attempts to deliberately bypass the "blockade" against 11 that I might set up?
 

Alex Ethridge

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Alex change the user account now in use to standard so that the person cannot install any new software. Make the admin account in your name with full privileges. Have the system auto log into the standard account and you should not have to worry about any software being installed or whatever.
Thanks, that's what I've done so far and unless I find something else to go with the belt and suspenders, I guess I'm ready to take it back.

Oh, and I also used GPEdit and did this:

Went to Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update > Windows Update for Business

Double-clicked on “Select the target feature update version”.

Set it to Enabled.

Typed 21H1 into the field.

She can still install programs as Standard User but, according to M$, only programs that affect her own account. Hopefully, the Admin account will still be intact in the event she crashes her own.
 
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My method might be a bit odd. But you can create a system image and store it outside the PC. If something goes wrong, restore it from the image.

There are also methods to create a backup partition from which you can restore. But storing externally might help in this case.
 

Alex Ethridge

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My method might be a bit odd. But you can create a system image and store it outside the PC. If something goes wrong, restore it from the image.

There are also methods to create a backup partition from which you can restore. But storing externally might help in this case.
Thanks for the suggestion but that doesn't always work as you can see in this thread. Additionally, on this particular crash, I attempted to restore an image that I have used successfully twice before. It failed this time booting only to a troubleshooting screen offering various options to repair, restore to factory settings, etc. I also tried another copy of that source image I had made months ago as a backup.

To be clear, the image that I restored successfully twice from the same source to the same destination, did not work the third time around. The source and destination disks tested and passed.
 

Alex Ethridge

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9,387
You say she's mentally challenged, so I doubt she installed and set up Windows 11 herself.
Does anyone else have access to her computer?

-------------------------------------------------
I asked her today and found she in the one who has been disabling the remote program and the one who installed Windows 11 all on her own. She seemed to already understand that installing 11 was a bad idea and said she will not do that again.
 

Alex Ethridge

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Microsoft struck out much of the work I enumerated above. I got a call from the lady today. Long story short, I found Microsoft had updated her computer to 21H1 and destroyed her account, all her desktop icons, set her up again as Administrator, deleted all her bookmarks and set her up on a Microsoft account instead of the Local she had yesterday.

I spent about an hour-and-a-half putting everything back like it was yesterday.

RANT: Microsoft are bullies and if the Federal communications laws passed in the early twentieth century applied to them, there would be a lot of them in prison for what they do to private citizens' computers.
 

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