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Strange periodic distortion in sound when watching .ts files

Discussion in 'Multimedia' started by seconds, Apr 6, 2014.

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  1. seconds

    seconds Thread Starter

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    Strange periodic distortion in sound when watching videos with any video players. The distortion doesn't happen in games or with other file types. The distortion sounds like the audio goes to some kind of fast loop every 15 seconds (it essentially sounds like brrrrrr). The video plays totally fine and the distortion only happens for maybe half a second. It is annoying though.

    I had this problem on my old computer and on my new computer so it is probably settings issue. Here are my computer specs:
    Tech Support Guy System Info Utility version 1.0.0.2
    OS Version: Microsoft Windows 8.1, 64 bit
    Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4440 CPU @ 3.10GHz, Intel64 Family 6 Model 60 Stepping 3
    Processor Count: 4
    RAM: 8120 Mb
    Graphics Card: AMD Radeon HD 6900 Series, 1024 Mb
    Hard Drives: C: Total - 228407 MB, Free - 159882 MB; E: Total - 1897854 MB, Free - 939402 MB;
    Motherboard: MSI, H87M-E33 (MS-7817)
    Antivirus: Bitdefender Antivirus Free Edition, Updated: Yes, On-Demand Scanner: Enabled

    Old computer had windows xp with older versions of the programs.

    I have all drivers up to date.

    I have tried messing with the audio settings in drivers and in vlc/windows media player but the problem stays.
     
  2. Oddba11

    Oddba11

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    Jim
    Hardware (ie: not sufficient for the file type) or codec issue.

    If the PC isn't fast enough to process the video file, the first item to have noticeable issues will be audio.

    As you note using a .ts file, that would imply blu-ray source material. So it could be high bitrate 1080P material that the PC can't process.

    It could also be audio codec related. Ensure you have the proper codecs needed for playback.

    Open Task Manager and watch cpu usage during playback.
     
  3. seconds

    seconds Thread Starter

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    I think vlc uses different codecs than windows media player yet both have the same problem so I doubt it is codec issue. I don't even have any codecs installed as this is fairly new machine where I installed win 8.1 on a fresh hard drive.

    This is also fairly new machine and it would be seriously strange if the machine was not fast enough. The .ts file in question has resolution of 960x540 so it is not a big file. CPU usages stays at 6-7% when I watch the file and there are no spikes or any abnormalities in the cpu usage graphs when the sound distortion occurs.

    I can't think of anything else than a settings issue simply because I had thise same problem on my old pc with had vlc but everything else (hardware and software) were different.
     
  4. Oddba11

    Oddba11

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    So multiple files or a single file? Or just .ts files?
     
  5. seconds

    seconds Thread Starter

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    Sorry for the late responses, I'm really busy with work.

    Just .ts files are causing problems as far as I know. Seems to be the same problem with all .ts files.
     
  6. Oddba11

    Oddba11

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    If it's a specific file type, it's likely codec related. Keep in mind there are two types of codecs, audio and video. In regards to Blu-Ray files, there are new HD audio tracks to consider. For best results (even with DVD), hardware decoding is suggested.

    DVD had three formats: PCM, Dolby Digital 5.1, and DTS

    Blu-Ray supports:
    Linear PCM (LPCM) - up to 8 channels of uncompressed audio. (mandatory)
    Dolby Digital (DD) - format used for DVDs, 5.1-channel surround sound. (mandatory)
    Dolby Digital Plus (DD+) - extension of Dolby Digital, 7.1-channel surround sound. (optional)
    Dolby TrueHD - lossless encoding of up to 8 channels of audio. (optional)
    DTS Digital Surround - format used for DVDs, 5.1-channel surround sound. (mandatory)
    DTS-HD High Resolution Audio - extension of DTS, 7.1-channel surround sound. (optional)
    DTS-HD Master Audio - lossless encoding of up to 8 channels of audio. (optional)
     
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