The "Science and Space" Thread #2

ekim68

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NASA astronauts have a new task: make videos of Estée Lauder products


The International Space Station has served as the world's most unique laboratory for two decades, hosting hundreds of scientific experiments, crews of astronauts and even the occasional slime.

But now, NASA, one of the space station's primary operators, is preparing to oversee the largest push of business activity aboard the ISS. Later this month, up to 10 bottles of a new Estée Lauder (EL) skincare serum will launch to the space station, a NASA spokesperson told CNN Business. NASA astronauts are expected to film the items in the microgravity environment of the ISS and the company will be able to use that footage in ad campaigns or other promotional material.
 

ekim68

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Cyclones of Color at Jupiter’s North Pole


Cyclones at the north pole of Jupiter appear as swirls of striking colors in this extreme false color rendering of an image from NASA’s Juno mission. The huge, persistent cyclone found at Jupiter’s north pole is visible at the center of the image, encircled by smaller cyclones that range in size from 2,500 to 2,900 miles (4,000 to 4,600 kilometers). Together, this pattern of storms covers an area that would dwarf the Earth.
pj25_26_27_28_poln_avrg_enh_denoise_cropdisc_sharp10a.jpg
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
56,696

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
56,696

Lunar orbiter to listen for radio signals from cosmic "Dark Ages"


The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) has announced a new addition to NASA’s upcoming moon-shot Artemis program. From the silent skies on the far side of the Moon, the DAPPER spacecraft will listen out for radio signals from the “Dark Ages” of the universe, before the first stars fired up.

Beginning around 370,000 years after the Big Bang, the universe settled into quite a dull existence. For millions of years after that, pretty much the only things around were huge clouds of hydrogen gas, but as everything started to cool down, pockets of that gas condensed and collapsed to form the first stars and black holes. With those stars came the first ever light, ending the Dark Ages and transitioning to a time often called the “Cosmic Dawn.”
 

ekim68

Mike
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Messages
56,696

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
56,696

Over 75% of space debris detected in new survey is unknown objects


All of this is mirrored in our expansion into the space domain. Since we started lobbing rockets into orbit in the 1950s, the amount of human-made trash whipping around the Earth has been steadily increasing.

Orbital debris is comprised of old, defunct satellites and the rockets that put them there. They range in size from flakes of paint to huge fairing sections. In February 2009 a worst-case scenario occurred, wherein two large defunct satellites – the commercial Iridium 33 and the Russian military-owned Kosmos-2251 – smashed into each other, creating a vast cloud of hazardous debris.

 

ekim68

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First Moon radiation measurements reveal risk to astronaut health

The instrument recorded an equivalent dose rate of around 60 microsieverts per hour. That’s about 200 times higher than what we’re exposed to here on the ground, between five and 10 times more than you’d get on a long-haul flight, and about 2.6 times more than experienced by astronauts on the International Space Station.

There are ways to reduce that exposure though. Moon bases could be set up in huge caverns and lava tubes that are believed to sprawl underground, or shelters constructed of moon dust could provide adequate protection on the surface.
assets.newatlas.jpg
 

ekim68

Mike
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Messages
56,696

Liquid water on Mars? New research indicates buried 'lakes'



The existence of liquid water on Mars — one of the more hotly debated matters about our cold, red neighbor — is looking increasingly likely.

New research published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy indicates that there really is a buried reservoir of super salty water near the south pole. Scientists say such a lake would significantly improve the likelihood that Mars just might harbor microscopic life of its own.
 

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