1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Thinking of Upgrading from Windows98

Discussion in 'Earlier Versions of Windows' started by Caos, Dec 30, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. Caos

    Caos Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    I'm running an eMachines Pentium Celeron Windows 98 (4.10.2222 A) with 256MB of memory. I have a 7 GIG C drive and an 80 GIG D drive. I also have Zone Alarm 3.1 installed on my system.

    I've never had any problems with the system, but I'm becoming more and more unsatisfied because other parts of the system (like Flash Player, Browsers, etc.) are no longer being supported.

    I couldn't use YouTube and I couldn't upgrade IE so I switched to Opera. After a few hours of working with it, I managed to get an older version of Flash Player up and running. The one recommended by Adobe didn't work so I had to install 9.0.16.0 - everything seemed great until Opera got a bug up its ... and decided to upgrade to a newer version all on its own. Then it didn't work any more. I tried installing older versions, but they didn't work as well and I couldn't figure out which old version I used to have or find a way to reinstall it. So now I'm running K-Meleon... but I'm not crazy about it.

    Now I'm having problems with Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 - I need to read some PDF files, but apparently I can't install a reader as new as I need.

    I don't want to go to XP. I use my computer mostly for playing older games that I still like (DOOM II, Civilization: Call to Power, Star Craft Brood War, Diablo II, etc.) and my four-year-old son likes watching videos on YouTube (mostly Doki and Pocoyo).

    So I'm thinking of trying Windows 2000 Professional. Will I have enough space on my C drive? Is it worth it? Any input would be appreciated.
     
  2. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    24,388
    Windows 2000 is a based on the NT kernel which is different from the Windows 9x kernel you're running now. You're likely to run into compatibility problems. I would suggest keeping the computer for the old games and programs and buy a new computer for newer applications.
     
  3. Caos

    Caos Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    What about the possibility of using KernelEx or some other similar program to run XP-rated programs on Win98? I've seen some websites that claim Opera 11 can run on Win98 using this program.
     
  4. Techyy

    Techyy

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    154
    -- Go for a new one !!!
     
  5. SDFOX 7

    SDFOX 7 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    386
    Youtube and Flash will work if you follow my instructions exactly. This procedure takes about 5 minutes.

    1) Download and install KernelEx. http://sourceforge.net/projects/kernelex/

    Note: You will need to reboot after the installation of KernelEx is complete, so save all your work before installing!

    2) Download and install the current version of Firefox from www.firefox.com

    Note: If you run into problems installing Firefox 3.x, you can always use the older Firefox 2.x version which is supported under Windows 98. This entire procedure will work regardless of whether the version is 2.x or 3.x.

    3) Download and install the Macromedia Flash Player 7 for Firefox here: http://fpdownload.macromedia.com/get/shockwave/flash/fp8_beta/install_flash_player_8.exe

    4) Close all programs and reboot. Open Firefox, go to Youtube and try playing a video.

    Youtube detects Flash 6, 7, 9, and non-current 10 versions as obsolete, and all old versions on Internet Explorer as obsolete, but for some reason does not detect version 8 on Firefox as being outdated. So this player works successfully.


    I have used this configuration on an old Win98 system for over a year with no problems. This trick also works on my Win95 and NT 4.0 systems; you can install Firefox 2.0 on Windows 95 if you follow my instructions here from June 8th of this year on TechGuy.org:


    [PENDING]: How to Successfully Install Mozilla Firefox 2.0 on Windows 95 (Finally!)


    Flash Player 8 is supported on Windows NT 4.0.

    However, to install Flash Player 8 on Windows 95, make the changes in the registry to read "Windows 98" and version "4.10.2222"; see my thread here:

    How to Watch Youtube and View Flash Sites in Windows NT 4.0 (and possibly Windows 95)

    (My first attempt failed because I tried this with Flash 7 instead of Flash 8).

    Let us know if it works!
     
  6. SDFOX 7

    SDFOX 7 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    386
    You should also check out this thread on the Microsoft forum network.

    If you are committed to Windows 9x as many of us are, there are 118 pages of information dedicated to projects aimed at keeping Windows 95/98/98SE/ME compatible with new programs.

    Windows 95/98/98SE/ME - MSFN:

    As of right now the Firefox 4.x beta works on Windows 98 as long as you have the current version of KernelEx installed on your system. See here: Firefox 4

    If you are not running the most current version of KernelEx you risk instability and data corruption!!!
     
  7. SDFOX 7

    SDFOX 7 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    386
    The KernelEx creator posted a list of several programs that were buggy or not working with KernelEx 4.0 and older, but are now working with 4.0 RC2 and later.

    According to the list, Acrobat Reader 9 works but is unstable; you should either use Acrobat Reader 7, 8, or use Foxit Reader instead. Office 2003 and viewers also apparently work, along with Java 6.x.

    http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/130936-kernelex-45-final/
     
  8. Caos

    Caos Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Well, SDFOX7 emboldened me and I downloaded KernelEx 4.5 Final (which is the version past RC5) and installed it. After rebooting, everything seemed normal and I took some time to check that my older programs worked. Even Ultima IV - Quest of the Avatar still works and I didn't need to twiddle with compatibility settings.

    Then I installed Opera 10.63, but it didn't run due to a 'missing' OUniAnsi.DLL file. I searched for the file and found it at c:\Program Files\Opera\
    After placing an additional copy in c:\windows\system\ it fired up perfectly and started to download Opera 11. I managed to get that shut down and after a Google search I found out how to shut off the automatic update.

    Next step: Flash Player 10, which worked fine. I haven't messed with Java or Adobe Reader yet, but if you want more updates reply and I'll continue providing information.
     
  9. Caos

    Caos Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    I can't get Java to run. Well, I checked and it said Java wouldn't work with Opera, which was fine by me as I have two other browsers (IE and K-Meleon) but I couldn't get it to work well. I tried downloading Java 5.0 but it won't run and it doesn't leave an error message. When I try it there's just an hourglass for 5 seconds and then nothing.

    I have Java v 1.4.0 working but I haven't been able to get anything more modern than that. I think it might be due to a shortage of space on drive C. I'm trying to install VLC Player on Drive D so I can delete Windows Player and free more space, but I think it should at least give me some sort of error message. Any insight?
     
  10. SDFOX 7

    SDFOX 7 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    386
    According to this link (scroll down to reply #32), Java 6.x doesn't necessarily work properly in Opera but works fine in IE (and you may try Firefox):

    http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/144723-opera-106-beta-doesnt-start/page__st__20

    Until I have more time to research, use the archived Java 6 Update 7; should work fine in IE 6. I recommend you download the "offline installer--the second link"--the online installers tend to be buggy. Should work without a problem. Post back.

    Also, according to reply #35, Opera 10.5x needed KernelEx to run on Windows 98, while 10.6x will run without KernelEx.

    Just so you know, I usually recommend Firefox over Opera as it has a far higher installed base (#2 browser) and most of the bugs have been worked out. There are far more Windows 9x users with Firefox than Opera, so it's easier to hack Firefox to run on 9x than it is to hack Opera to run on 9x.
     
  11. aka Brett

    aka Brett Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Messages:
    16,918
    Out of the blue here...a person should be able to pick up an old box for a decent price and move up to xp.
    I would give up on 98 for a main os...the time is approaching where one will have to give up 98 for any online use IMO
     
  12. SDFOX 7

    SDFOX 7 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    386
    You are missing the point.

    I thought the purpose of this forum was obvious, but I'll state it anyway.

    People that are still using Windows 9x this many years later are doing so out of choice.

    I also believe that for the majority of people, they surf the web, create documents, and check e-mail. In that case Windows 9x IS sufficient.

    I'd wager that Windows 9x is a far safer OS to use online than XP or Vista or 7. One reason is that Windows 9x doesn't have the numerous unnecessary services that come bundled with XP/Vista/7, and the other reason is that much of the malware out there simply won't run the DOS codebase that is Windows 9x.

    Many of us use Windows XP everyday but choose to use the old systems for old games and 16-bit applications that don't run properly on XP, if they run at all.

    Just as there are those that still enjoy the DOS forum, there are many that enjoy the Windows 9x/NT/2000 forum.

    It's called "retrocomputing" and it's actually quite a fun hobby.

    The office formats for Office (.doc, .xls, and .ppt) worked fine for almost 20 years. Why did Microsoft have to change the formats? Because they needed to either a)force people to upgrade and/or to cripple the old versions of Office.

    In my opinion, Office 97 works just as good as Office 2007, so why would I spend $600 every two to three years (for the Professional version) just to do the same thing with my computer that I have done for years?

    I'll tell you, most people I know are actually AVOIDING the new versions of office (2007 and later) because the documents that they send to other people can't be opened with the older versions. Why would you want to send files to your customers if they can't open them?
     
  13. aka Brett

    aka Brett Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Messages:
    16,918
    While much of the above may be true..we still have an old kernel that is without support with less and less software being available as time passes

    Many obstacles in the way as far as online browsing.

    I agree with you on the office issues...Microsoft didnt need to go through all the changes.
    But they did,,which further puts older operating systems behind.

    Taking the fact that 98 is an old OS and is no longer supported.
    Less software available everyday.
    Backwards compatibility is disappearing.

    All good reasons to not have it as the main OS.
    The OP is even thinking about upgrading ;)
     
  14. Caos

    Caos Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Ok thanks I'll try the other browser. I assume most of you haven't read my profile but I'm an American-born English teacher living in Peru. I make about $1,000 a month on which I support a family of four.

    Now you're right - I could spend some cash and get a more modern, but not WAY modern machine and retire my eMachine. In fact, I had a machine like that while I was running a small business. There were, however, several problems.

    First of all, the OS was in Spanish. While my Spanish isn't terrible, I'd just rather have it in English. The keyboard was also the Latin American standard with the ñ instead of the : and that was also annoying. I also had MS Office in Spanish. Then XP downloaded its updates and one of them was one that told me my OS was a pirated version, and offered to formalize me for a small fee payable to Microsoft. It was annoying... and without that program installed, Microsoft wouldn't let me download the security updates needed for XP (I think they have since changed their policy). The MS Office was very probably also pirated.

    Additionally, the only thing I really ever used the machine for was to run a small spreadsheet that let me keep track of my accounts receivable. In short, I had a monster of an OS when I probably would have been fine with Tinycore and Openoffice.

    Finally, after less than 18 months, the machine died. It had been cobbled together with a mix of low quality Korean and Chinese parts to get the price down and it just didn't last whereas my eMachine is still going strong after 11 years.

    So SDFOX7 thanks for your suggestions. They have been very helpful so far. aka Brett you're probably right I will need to eventually buy a new computer... but that day is not today.
     
  15. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2,634
    I'm quite interested in the fact that you have an 11 year old emachines computer that has been reliable. They weren't noted for that.

    Given your divergent goals, I think your ultimate solution will be to upgrade...but not upgrade. The problems you are having with compatibility using Win98 are just going to get worse - you clearly recognize that - but when you upgrade you'll lose a lot of the history that you are familiar with...the old games, the old software that works perfectly well, and so forth.

    So what you need to do is upgrade to a fairly modern machine, then install a virtual machine in it and load your Win98 system as a virtual machine. This will give you everything you want.

    For the hardware, you'd have to obtain a box using your own resources; I don't know what is easily available to you in that region or what it costs. For this type of migration, you would be able to move your emachines keyboard over, which would solve the keyboard issue.

    For the OS, if you didn't want to give Microsoft your money, you could install a Linux system. That OS is free, and modern. It supports virtual machines very well. You would have to learn a new OS, of course, but you have to do that anyway if you migrate from Win98 to something more modern; Win7 doesn't really resemble Win98 in any substantive way.

    I personally run a Linux workstation with a virtual machine (VMware Workstation) installed. In that virtual machine, I still have a copy of Windows NT that I can boot (though I no longer do) and I have a copy of Windows 2000 that I use daily. In my Windows 2000 I have Office 97 that I use sometimes, and Corel Wordperfect 8 that I use all the time. I also have virtual machines for Windows 7 Professional, and several different Linux distributions that I need for this or for that. In Win7 Pro, I also have Office 2007.

    The point is that modern technology can be employed to maintain a legacy environment perfectly well. You are therefore not locked into old hardware and an old environment; you really can take it with you.

    I personally think that virtual machines are the way to go anyway; your system is then freed from the underlying hardware and you can move it to any new platform you want to use for the indefinite future.
     
  16. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/971573

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice