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Too much light

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by dano_61, Apr 4, 2010.

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  1. dano_61

    dano_61 Thread Starter

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    Hi

    I took some pictures at the beach and they are very bright ( overexposed) , i have two questions, can i fix them and how do i change settings,
    i have a Sony DSC-S-75

    Dan
     
  2. Noyb

    Noyb Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Maybe .. If not too overexposed .. or underexposed
    Adobe Photoshop or Elements has a Shadow/Highlight tool that can make some amazing adjustments.
    Can you attach a sample photo ???
     
  3. dano_61

    dano_61 Thread Starter

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  4. Noyb

    Noyb Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Most of my digital photos usually need some Shadow/Highlight adjustments to suit me.

    Too much adjustment can result in Noise ..
    But this one looks like it's too overexposed ... The picture info is missing and I can't drag it out.
    Looks like you're into the camera settings first
     

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  5. dano_61

    dano_61 Thread Starter

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    This is a bad example, its way too gone, i think i need to write this bunch off and read more on my settings

    Thanks Noyb
     
  6. Noyb

    Noyb Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Yes .. Check back if you find the adjustments in the camera .

    Here's the Light <> Dark levels of your original Picture ...
    you can see that about 2/3rds of the dark info is missing .. (the left side of the level Histogram)
     

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  7. wowzer

    wowzer

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    I have an old dsc s-70 and there are many settings to study...

    I can't even find it at the moment...sorry

    Next time you could try spot metering(on a darker area) in manual mode.

    Up the shutter speed, again in manual mode

    In aperture mode try dialing in some exposure compensation to the minus side

    just a few thoughts. I'll see if I can find mine which should be very similiar
     
  8. dano_61

    dano_61 Thread Starter

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    Thanks Wowzer

    I think it maybe time for a new camera, the battery life really sucks its older camera but i will try that

    Dan
     
  9. antimoth

    antimoth

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    I also had a Sony from that era, and it was not a bad little camera when outside.

    OK. Here's what the EXIF setting on your picture said. It tells us exactly why it's overexposed.

    ISO: 100
    Shutter: 1/1000
    Aperture: f2.1
    Mode: Aperture Priority
    Metering: Spot

    In aperture priority, the lens was fixed wide open at f2.1. The Sony meter saw a bright scene and tried to cut the exposure as short as possible. It maxed out at 1/1000 second, but that wasn't fast enough Still too much light. Scene is overexposed. In general, use a wide aperture when light is poor. Use a smaller aperture if there is strong light.

    The quick fix here would have been to set the aperture to something like f11 in aperture mode and the Sony could have cut off the light at a slower speed. Or you could have gone into Program mode and it would have found a suitable aperture/speed combo. Or you could have picked 1/1000 sec in shutter priority mode, and the Sony would have picked the right aperture.

    I and the other photo enthusiasts could type pages of stuff about exposure. It is not a difficult concept, although too many authors make it seem so. Your old Sony is a nice camera to learn on, because it does offer manual, program, shutter, and aperture modes.
     
  10. dano_61

    dano_61 Thread Starter

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    Thank you Antimoth very informative, i will try that
     
  11. kaktex

    kaktex

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    "Metering: Spot" didn't help at all.
    It was trying to expose that narrow band of trees in the exact center of the photo to 18% grey, and succeeded.
    If you see a cross in the center of your screen, that is the ONLY place where exposure will be measured.

    I only use spot metering when trying to get something dark within a bright area to expose well, rather than as a silhouette.
    The background will blow out like your pics did, so I only use it in select situations.
     
  12. wowzer

    wowzer

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    I actually use spot-metering quite a bit.

    One key is to know where to meter then recompose. If that option is available in the camera being used.

    On newer cameras matrix and multi-point metering has improved greatly unlike older systems.
     
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