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TP-Link AD7200 wired speeds cut in half

Discussion in 'Networking' started by bloodta, Jan 8, 2018.

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  1. bloodta

    bloodta Thread Starter

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    My wired speeds have been cut In half since I upgraded my router to the Talon AD7200. I can plug in my old router in and I get my normal speedsAnyone knowhow to fix this, I read in other forums about the C7 and disabling hardware NAT and switch to software NAT. I don't see that option on the AD7200. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Describe your network--from ISP to device(s).

    What were some of your "wired speeds"?

    How did you "upgrade" your router?

    How do you "plug in [your] old router in"?
     
  3. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    As an aside, it astounds me the amount of wrong information being pushed around the Internet. This is in reference to what you found about NAT. When one mentions something being done in hardware, usually there is a specific chip such as an ASIC or a coprocessor which is used to help off load a specific task from the main CPU. This subsystem is optimized to run a specific task or set of tasks. When you hear something is being run in software, this means the main CPU is crunching the processing along with other processes and tasks it has to do. Why running something in hardware is more desirable is because the chip which was designed to do the task is optimized to efficiently run this task(s). This frees up the CPU to do other things. So the benefit is better overall performance. To hear someone say disable hardware processing just doesn't know what he/she is talking about.

    For consumer grade equipment, it is highly doubtful the manufacturer has gone through the expense of including a ASIC or coprocessor. You only find these features in higher end business grade equipment.

    Back to the statement of turning off hardware NAT processing. I've never seen a specific chip designed to deal with NAT tasks. The ASICs I've seen are to do offloading tasks to deal with things like VPN/encryption which does hammer the CPU due to the heavy computations involved.
     
  4. bloodta

    bloodta Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the reply. I have Charter Spectrum. I used to have a DIR-655 and an Asus rt-N66u , with it wired speeds were between 90-110 megs, now with the AD7200 they are between 30-45 megs wired. If I switch out the AD7200 to the DIR-655, speeds go back to 90+ megs. I have 1 PC wired, Roku wired and a smart TV wired. I have iPhones that all connect wirelessly. Again, this was not a problem with the DIR-655. Reason I "upgraded " to the Talon AD7200 was too many disconnects with the other 2 routers.
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Thanks for the partial description of your network.

    You had two wireless routers--a DIR-655 and an Asus rt-N66u. How were they connected and configured?

    You now have, apparently, two wireless routers--AD7200 and an Asus rt-N66u. Connected and configured the same way with the replacement of DIR-655 by AD7200?

    What modem?
     
  6. bloodta

    bloodta Thread Starter

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    I had the DIR-655 a few years ago. I pulled it of retirement when my Asus rt-N66u went down a month ago. I've only had one router connected at a time. All routers when in use were configured with "stock" settings. The modem is an Arris TM1602.
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    That modem is a modem/router combo, right? If so, are it and the new router using different LAN IP subnets? If they use the same subnets internet access through the second router is often non-existent, unreliable, or slowed.
     
  8. bloodta

    bloodta Thread Starter

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    The modem is not a modem/router combo.
     
  9. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I can think of no other possible issues other than the new router being defective.
     
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