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TrueCrypt not performing fsck on restart

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by imagenesis, Nov 30, 2011.

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  1. imagenesis

    imagenesis Thread Starter

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    When starting fsck through Truecrypt on a mounted volume, it will return with a message that it will continue the operation on system restart. However, this never occurs. Please let me know if you have experienced this and what the solution is to complete a fsck on a mounted Truecrypt volume. Thanks
     
  2. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    What is "fsck"?
     
  3. imagenesis

    imagenesis Thread Starter

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    Sry, I meant chkdsk. Both are drive checking command line utilities.
     
  4. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    Is this a system volume? If so, I would think check disk would run after you enter your boot password.

    If it's not a system volume, you'll have to move the data, delete the container, and then scan the drive.
     
  5. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    You don't get the run on system restart because chkdsk will run before the volume is mounted and opened. In the case of a truecrypt volume, this is before it is available for use and chkdsk can't find a filesystem on it.

    I have no idea at all how you would check a truecrypt system partition when Windows is the OS. I would think that you can just unmount any partition that is not a system partition, then run chkdsk in repair mode on it as a dismounted volume.

    In Linux, of course, this would be simple. You might try it with a Linux Live CD and use the ntfsfix command. Ntfsfix only does basic things to an NTFS filesystem, and schedules it for a chkdsk run when next Windows starts, but it will at least tell you what kind of shape it is in. Also, testdisk might help with some ntfs problems.

    I've had ntfsfix successfully repair the NTFS partitions on my workstation (legacy...I now run Windows only in virtual machines hosted in Linux, but this system has a direct 14 year continuous history and there are a number of physical NTFS partitions whose history extends that far back) many, many times. In fact, the first time it ever failed to fix an NTFS partition was yesterday. However, I was able to mount the partition from Linux and copy everything off (it was backed up anyway...) then reformat the partition from within Windows and reload it.
     
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