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Two Hard Disks and GRUB location /dev/hdb6

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by zillah, Jan 13, 2006.

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  1. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    Does that mean I am going to intsall the grub on the second hard disk ?
     
  2. saikee

    saikee

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    You are already booting from the 2nd disk.
     
  3. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    I am going to try your suggestion and let you know.

    By the way about the problem read this please :

    {{
    zillah,
    I decided to try and duplicate your setup in my lab. So I did a clean install of Windows Server 2003 on /dev/hda and FC4 on /dev/hdb and told GRUB to install itself in the MBR of /dev/hda.

    Here's my problem. GRUB doesn't seem to even be in the MBR. When I use a rescue boot into FC4 and try to reinstall GRUB with the command grub-install /dev/hda it reports back with an error message that there is no BIOS drive /dev/hdb. This may or may not be similiar to your situation. I wil have to investigate mine }}.
     
  4. saikee

    saikee

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    You can then advise him/her to do a
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    to see all the disks and partitions in the PC.

    It is possible the guy has hooked a CD drive with the first disk and use the second IDE cable for the second disk. In such a case he/she has a hdc and the hdb would have been given to the CD drive.
     
  5. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    Done,,,thanks saikee
     
  6. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    After this lengthy threda we have started on 13-January,,,I want to ask you few questions:

    1- From geometry out ,,,,does the it indicate to some sort of physicall order problem ? (i.e are they in right place,,,,, hda and hdb),,,,Or there is something wrong I am not aware of it ?,,,,,for me by looking at the physicall location for HDs they are alright ?

    2- Can I now install Solaris ? What precaution I have to take in consideration before installation ?

    3- I will read the thread again and again to clarify any ambiguity.
     
  7. saikee

    saikee

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    Yes it has been a long thread and you should start a new one once your current booting problem is over. Using the thread to gain more insight is OK as long as you know how to provide the information. It is a pig's job to pick information from your previous posts to convince you.

    Regarding your questions here are my thought

    (1) Linux is reiable because it names the physical connection positions of the 4 IDE cable connection positions as hda, hdb, hdc and hdd. The master of the primary IDE is always hda even if you hook a CD drive to it. The slave of the primary IDE is hdb. hdc and hdd belong to the master and slave of secondary IDE cable. Therefore these information will never change as they are the physical connection points of the hardware. Modern Bios do not call these positions as masters and slaves and have to call them by the device model names, like Maxtor 6L300R0, Hitachi Deskstar T7K250 etc in order to be able to select any one as the first bootable device. Then there are Sata disks, usually provided in pairs and any of them can be nominated as the first bootable disk too.

    Therefore a user can arrange the boot disk order virtually in any way he/she likes, although it is customary to select either hda or sda as the first bootable disk to minimize confusion. Thus the boot disk order of (hd0), (hd1), (hd2) etc are not necessarily has to correspond to the oder of hda, hdb, hdc, hdd, sda, sdb, sdc...

    Grub has ambition outside Linux and it uses the boot disk order directly from to Bios and hence it refers the disks by number because Dos/Windows can call hda as "C" drive wile BSD may like the same disk refered to as wd1.

    The geometry command is therefore the boot disk order arranged by the user. It so happens that you have not bothered much with the BIOS setup and did not realise it was wholly under your control (as you can always overide whatever BIOS has come up with)

    (2) You can install Solaris any time you wish. The precaution I would advise is to install it on a disk where there is no extended partition. Solaris needs to be installed and booted from a primary partition. It only take up one primary partition and divides it internally for Swap and other directories. If Solaris is denied the use of the MBR it will install its boot loader inside its root partition and automatically chainloadable by Grub just like a Windows. If you have to put Solaris in a disk with logical partitions then it pay to hide the extended partition when booting Solaris. My signature on 100+ systems shows a complete Grub menu on dealing with Solaris and a few other BSD systems.

    (3) I have tried another set of disks to experiement Solaris installation "without" hiding the Linux in the extended partition and have suffered the partition table corruption for the 4th time. Therefore make sure you do not have important data in the disk where you want Solaris to be installed. I advocate hiding the entended partition because the entire logical partition set is hidden and revealed by one Grub command. If you run Grub then it will be necessary to have Grub installed in one of the primary partition so that its menu.lst does not become unavilable when host partition is hidden.
     
  8. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    What did you mean by order virtually ?Does it soething oppose to physical order for instance ?


    Does that mean that hd0 can be correspond to hda on one machine or it can be correspond to hdc on another box ? How can I verify its correspondence ? does it through geometry command ? or fdisk -l or something else ?


    I did not get this ? physical boot disk or something else?


    Believe me I did bother myself for two days asking people in differents forum about the BOIS for my motherboard,,,but till now , I could not find any option I can change the order for the booted devices,,,I wish I can send the motherboard to you via email to look at it,,,.
    I am going to discuss this issue with IBM (PC that I have got at work form IBM ) and let you know
     
  9. saikee

    saikee

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    The boot disk order is selectable from the BIOS screen by the user.

    You can select hdc as the first bootable disk on the same machine. I have 2 IDE and 2 Sata and can arrange the booting order any way I want between hda, hdc, sda and sdb.

    Only fairly older BIOS permits the two master disk positions to be selected (not slaves) but to be able to select which disk to boot first is as old as the first generation of DOS. I certainly started using it when the biggest disks were not bigger than 20Mb but twice as high. When I had my first 8086 PC it has four 5.25" bays populated by 2 No. of 5.25" floppy drives and 2 No. of 10 Mb hard drives. I personally added the 10Mb Seagate hard disk at a price I could buy one with 500Gb today.

    If you can tell the BIOS to alter the booting queue you are effectively control the outcome of the geometry command in Grub.

    I can believe your BIOS may be restricted. This one of the reasosns I never buy branded PCs because you pay more to get less.
     
  10. zillah

    zillah Thread Starter

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    I just did another test right now,,,I used Hirens CD V7.2 (Has got heaps of DOS utility) i think you have heard about it,,,and I use partition utility,,,they have got all of them

    1- I used Partition Magic v8,,,,it showed me that the hard disk with four partitions is Drive 1 and the hard disk with 3 partitions is Drive 2.

    2- I System commander v9.01,,,,it showed me that the hard disk with four partitions is Drive 0 and the hard disk with 3 partitions is Drive 1.

    3- I used Ranish partition,,,,it showed me that the hard disk with four partitions is Drive 0 and the hard disk with 3 partitions is Drive 1.

    4- I used Paragon partition manager,,,,it showed me that the hard disk with four partitions is Drive 0 and the hard disk with 3 partitions is Drive 1

    What does that mean ? does the drive 0 mean Master ? or it does mean Slave ? I get confused form this PC,,,,,Drive 0 it should refer to Master,,,Am I right ?
     
  11. saikee

    saikee

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    To me they all confirm the 4-partition disk is the first one in the booting queue. Some software counts from 0 while others count from 1. That is all.

    You should regard the first disk is the one at the head of the booting queue.

    A Bios usually has an option to go into rest of the booting queue to search for a bootable primary partition if one isn't found in the first boot disk. This option may not always be switched off though.
     
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