Two Routers on one phone line

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boatyben

Thread Starter
Joined
Jun 4, 2004
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30
Hi There :)

I am trying to increase the range of my internet at home, and am having some difficulty!
1) Originally I had one wireless router ("Siemens"), which covered two computers at home
2) I have added a third pc, which is too far from Siemens to connect to the wireless network
3) It's also too far away to run an ethernet cable from Siemens to the third pc
4) Their is a second phone socket (same phone number) by the third pc...
5) ...I have tried putting a second router ("dlink") on this second socket, and connecting it directly to the third pc
6) However, dlink can only connect to the internet intermittently, unlike the Siemens one which is always on



I've attached an image of the setup. If you have any suggestions as to how I can modify this setup to get fast, reliable internet to the third pc I would be very grateful! (Ideally the fastest internet connection to the house would now go to the third pc.)

Many thanks in advance,

Ben
 

etaf

Wayne
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Joined
Oct 2, 2003
Messages
65,484
i would not expect you to be able to connect to routers to the same ISP on a phone line - does the third PC need wireless or can it use a LAN cable - you could use a powersupply LAN connection - this type of thing - NOT used this make myself http://www.amazon.co.uk/Max-Value-M...1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1272201216&sr=8-1
But I have used one and it worked really well (cant remember the make now, its in a friends house - NOTE - it did not work on an extension lead )
I'm also not sure - but you then maybe able to use this LAN connection to connect a 2nd router and then use the wireless - but you need someone like johnwill / Terrynet to confirm that
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From a JohnWill post

Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router

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Frank4d

Retired Trusted Advisor
Joined
Sep 10, 2006
Messages
9,126
One option would be the ethernet over powerline adapters as mentioned be etaf. Or better, run an ethenet cable and connect it to a LAN port on each router.

Running an ethernet cable require a drill and wood bits, a fish tape, and the correct mindset (I am going to run the cable up inside wall 'A', across the attic, and down inside wall 'B', if it takes me all weekend to do it).
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
The other folks are right, you can't connect two DSL modems to one phone line, that will never work properly!

Running an ethernet cable require a drill and wood bits, a fish tape, and the correct mindset (I am going to run the cable up inside wall 'A', across the attic, and down inside wall 'B', if it takes me all weekend to do it).
And it just might take all weekend! :D

Another route is increase the range of the primary router.

Hawking Tech has a number of products that will help you increase your wireless range. The root page is Hawking Hi-Gain™ WiFi Range Extending Products.

Some of the more interesting products are this Hawking [HSB2] Hi-Gain WiFi Signal Booster, which can be used on either end of a wireless connection to boost the signal power.

Another way to increase your signal strength is by the use of hi-gain antennas. You can choose from omni-directional or directional models, here are a some examples.

Hawking [HAI7SIP] Hi-Gain 7dBi Omni-Directional Antenna

Hawking [HAI15SC] Hi-Gain 15dBi Corner Antenna

[HAO14SD] Outdoor Hi-Gain 14dBi Directional Antenna Kit

For 802.11n applications, this ZyXEL ANT1106 6db omni-directional antenna can be used.

For really long range outdoor applications, this 24dB parabolic WiFi Antenna may be a good choice.

If you have a wireless adapter that doesn't have provisions for an external antenna, one adapter that I've had good luck with is a Rosewill RNX-G1 USB Wireless Adapter. It's feature is that is has a removable antenna and will accommodate replacement antennas.

This is just a sample of available products, many people have hi-gain antennas with similar specifications, but I haven't seen any other suppliers of signal boosters.
 

boatyben

Thread Starter
Joined
Jun 4, 2004
Messages
30
Dear Etaf, Frank4D and JohnWill,

Thank you very much for your help!

1) I now know that I can’t connect two routers to one phone line. (If you have time, I’d be very interested to know why this does not work)

2) If I understand correctly, I have four options available to me
i) Run an ethernet cable directly from the first router to my third pc
+ Good performance​
- Difficult job over a long distance/ several walls​

ii) Buy a more powerful antenna for both my router and pc
+ Relatively cheap​
- Might not work if walls are thick​

iii) Buy a signal booster (which attaches to router?)
+ Better than just getting new antennae?​
- Not many available in UK?​

iv) Buy powerline adapters to indirectly connect my first router and third pc
+ Easy to install​
- Worse performance than a direct Ethernet cable?​

3) I’m going to go with iv) to start, and am buying:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B001AIKBB4/ref=ord_cart_shr?ie=UTF8&m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE
I’ll mark the case as solved if they work :)

Many thanks guys,

Ben
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
I'd read the reviews first, 10% of them died on the spot.
 

etaf

Wayne
Moderator
Joined
Oct 2, 2003
Messages
65,484
I agree with Johnwill, have a good look through the reviews, i also like to see what others have purchased, found a few good items that way - amazon does solicit feedback on orders , but also take into consideration, people do like to write if negative, and usually cant be bothered if everything went OK - i often look to see if DoA, came ontime , quality of after service etc
 
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